UXINDIA18 - “Users” are people, too: 3 approaches design teams can use to enhance awareness of users as humans

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October 04, 2018

UXINDIA18 - “Users” are people, too: 3 approaches design teams can use to enhance awareness of users as humans

Keynote by Steve - Day 1

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uxindia

October 04, 2018
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Transcript

  1. None
  2. “Users” are people, too 3 approaches design teams can use

    to enhance awareness of users as humans
  3. Steve Fadden, Ph.D. UX Research Manager, Google Lecturer, UC Berkeley

    School of Information
  4. Question: How do you feel? 1 - 2 - 3

    - 4 - 5
  5. Users?

  6. Who are we designing for?

  7. None
  8. None
  9. “Only two industries refer to their customers as 'users': computer

    design and drug dealing." Edward Tufte, information visualization pioneer
  10. We’re all “users”

  11. 1. Understand the drivers

  12. Needs

  13. “If I had asked people what they wanted, they would

    have said faster horses." Author unknown
  14. “If there is any one secret of success, it lies

    in the ability to get the other person’s point of view and see things from that person’s angle as well as from your own." Henry Ford, automotive industry pioneer
  15. Critical Incident • Description • Actions taken • Feelings •

    Outcome • Future actions/responses desired
  16. Kano Model • Satisfaction if feature present • Satisfaction if

    feature absent • Overall importance Absence Absence Presence Presence
  17. Which?

  18. Hierarchy of UX needs Meaningful Pleasurable Convenient Usable Reliable Functional

    (useful) Significant Memorable, worth sharing Super easy, works as expected Used without difficulty Available, accurate Works as programmed Anderson, S. P. (2011). Seductive interaction design: Creating playful, fun, and effective user experiences. Berkeley, CA: New Riders
  19. None
  20. Values

  21. Laddering Get at the core reasons • “Why is that

    important?” • “Can you clarify why?” • “Why do you need to do that?” • “Explain why that is?”
  22. Listening Understand what drives people • Reasoning • Reactions •

    Principles • Values
  23. Question: How do you feel? 1 - 2 - 3

    - 4 - 5
  24. Emotions

  25. Survey Self-report emotional state • Valence ◦ Angry ◦ Confused

    ◦ Interested ◦ Delighted • Intensity ◦ Weak → Strong
  26. Biometrics Emotional state from behavior and measurements • Facial feature

    tracking • Pupil diameter • Galvanic Skin Response • Blood pressure • Heart Rate Variability • Brain activity
  27. 2. Capture the context

  28. None
  29. Show the journey Depict experience across phases • Before, during,

    after • Actions • Thoughts • Emotions • Opportunities
  30. Depict emotion Illustrate emotional change along the journey • Feelings

    • Thoughts • Associations • Opportunities
  31. Promote empathy Capture what users • Say • Think •

    Feel • Do
  32. Question: How do you feel? 1 - 2 - 3

    - 4 - 5
  33. 3. Maintain awareness across stakeholders

  34. None
  35. Track achievement How we are doing • Goals • Usage

    • Engagement • Adoption • Satisfaction
  36. Key moments Critical points of the experience • Beginning •

    End • Peaks • Delight • Pain points
  37. Socialize Always make the experience top of mind • Review

    key moment metrics • Use journey as centerpiece • Share stories and themes • Engage all stakeholders
  38. Take action

  39. What next? Start/continue the process • Critical user profile •

    Context of use • User values, needs, emotions • Journey (before, during, after) • Key moments • Continuous monitoring • Socialization
  40. “Want your users to fall in love with your designs?

    Fall in love with your users." Dana Chisnell, usability research expert
  41. Further reading Anderson, S. P. (2011). Seductive interaction design: Creating

    playful, fun, and effective user experiences. Berkeley, CA: New Riders. Jordan, P. W. (2000). Designing pleasurable products: An introduction to the new human factors. London: Taylor & Francis. Norman, D. A. (2004). Emotional design: Why we love (or hate) everyday things. New York: Basic Books. Walter, A. (2011). Designing for emotion. New York, N.Y: A Book Apart/Jeffrey Zeldman.
  42. Thank you! Twitter: @sfadden Slideshare: www.slideshare.net/SteveFadden1 Linkedin: www.linkedin.com/in/stevefadden (please remind

    me how we met!)