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Jon Kolko - The Next Step for Design: Social Entrepreneurship

Jon Kolko - The Next Step for Design: Social Entrepreneurship

As designers are increasingly recognised as both thought leaders and the drivers of large-scale change, it's become evident that we've outgrown the traditional contexts of our work - as stewards of organisational change in large corporations, and as hired guns at consultancies.

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UX London

May 01, 2012
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  1. The Next Step for Design: Social Entrepreneurship Jon Kolko Director,

    Austin Center for Design
  2. 1/ We’ve Arrived!

  3. 3 | 4/22/2012 We’re in the middle of an enormous

    professional shift.
  4. 4 | 4/22/2012 For years, design was about form giving.

  5. 5 | 4/22/2012

  6. 6 | 4/22/2012

  7. 7 | 4/22/2012 During this period, design was a big

    deal – to designers.
  8. 8 | 4/22/2012 Then, design was at the heart of

    the “experience” and “innovation” conversations.
  9. 9 | 4/22/2012

  10. 10 | 4/22/2012 That gave us a “seat at the

    table.”
  11. 11 | 4/22/2012 Now, it’s beginning to gain recognition as

    a prime mover for the next century.
  12. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDZFcDGpL4U

  13. 13 | 4/22/2012

  14. 14 | 4/22/2012 “To win the future, we must out-innovate,

    out-educate, and out-build the rest of the world.” “To win the future, we must out-innovate, out-educate, and out-build the rest of the world.”
  15. 15 | 4/22/2012

  16. 16 | 4/22/2012 “The new breed of ‘user experience’ designers

    – part sketch artist, part programmer, with a dash of behavioural scientist thrown in – are some of the most sought-after employees in technology.” “The new breed of ‘user experience’ designers – part sketch artist, part programmer, with a dash of behavioural scientist thrown in – are some of the most sought-after employees in technology.”
  17. 2/ Don’t Look Behind The Curtain.

  18. 18 | 4/22/2012

  19. None
  20. 20 | 4/22/2012 IDSA2011 Best In Show! IDSA2011 Best In

    Show!
  21. 21 | 4/22/2012 “The leading social network for people with

    wavy, curly, and kinky hair…” “The leading social network for people with wavy, curly, and kinky hair…”
  22. 22 | 4/22/2012 “Kohort allows for hierarchical groups, so groups

    can have as many subgroups as a user would like." “Kohort allows for hierarchical groups, so groups can have as many subgroups as a user would like."
  23. 23 | 4/22/2012 “Broadcast live from your phone to Facebook.”

    “Broadcast live from your phone to Facebook.”
  24. 24 | 4/22/2012 We’re really good at designing stuff. We’re

    really bad at picking what to design.
  25. 25 | 4/22/2012

  26. 26 | 4/22/2012

  27. 27 | 4/22/2012 Our “selection” problems may not be our

    fault.
  28. 28 | 4/22/2012 Even if we don’t want to design

    the bathroom finder…
  29. 29 | 4/22/2012 We still run headfirst into organizational roadblocks…

  30. 30 | 4/22/2012 we still find ourselves embedded in a

    culture of consensus…
  31. 31 | 4/22/2012 we’re still contained by billability, utilization, and

    quarterly dividends.
  32. 32 | 4/22/2012 “It is the customer who determines what

    a business is … what the business thinks it produces is not of first importance.” Peter Drucker
  33. 33 | 4/22/2012 “Power and machinery, money and goods, are

    useful only as they set us free to live.” Henry Ford
  34. 34 | 4/22/2012 Our organizational structures should exist only to

    enable powerful and positive change.
  35. 35 | 4/22/2012 Right now, our organizational structures are disabling

    us.
  36. 36 | 4/22/2012 We need to get out of the

    organizational machine in order to work on problems worth solving.
  37. 3/ A Way Forward

  38. 38 | 4/22/2012 1982

  39. 39 | 4/22/2012 1991, Nikon / Kodak DCS420 $28,000 2011,

    Serial CMOS Camera $22
  40. 40 | 4/22/2012 1983, Motorola DynaTAC 8000X $3995 2010, Huawei

    IDEOS $100
  41. 41 | 4/22/2012 1983, Motorola DynaTAC 8000X $3995 2010, Huawei

    IDEOS $100 2.8-inch (240x320) touch display, 528MHz processor, 3.2-megapixel camera, 16Gig memory with a microSD slot, HSDPA, Wi-Fi (802.11n), GPS, Bluetooth, 3G Mobile Hotspot support for up to 8 devices…
  42. 42 | 4/22/2012 In your lifetime, the cost of producing

    a high-tech product – and launching it to a mass audience – has gone from exorbitantly expensive, to… 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 25 0 2011 1985
  43. 43 | 4/22/2012 $0. 24 23 22 21 20 19

    18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 25 0 2011 1985
  44. 44 | 4/22/2012

  45. 45 | 4/22/2012 Maybe you don’t need the organizational machine

    after all.
  46. 46 | 4/22/2012 “What about my mortgage?”

  47. 47 | 4/22/2012

  48. “$2 Billion in Resources to Support Job-Creating Startups” “$2 Billion

    in Resources to Support Job-Creating Startups”
  49. 49 | 4/22/2012 “Wait..”

  50. 50 | 4/22/2012 “You want me to challenge all existing

    norms by quitting my well-paying job,
  51. 51 | 4/22/2012 “You want me to challenge all existing

    norms by quitting my well-paying job, cutting my salary in half,
  52. 52 | 4/22/2012 “You want me to challenge all existing

    norms by quitting my well-paying job, cutting my salary in half, working long hours,
  53. 53 | 4/22/2012 “You want me to challenge all existing

    norms by quitting my well-paying job, cutting my salary in half, working long hours, and trying to take on the institutionalized organizations of the global 2000 by starting my own company?”
  54. 54 | 4/22/2012

  55. None
  56. None
  57. None
  58. None
  59. 59 | 4/22/2012

  60. 60 | 4/22/2012 “In seven decades, there appears to be

    little more technological improvement to the flagship Honeywell thermostat than the replacement of a mechanical display with an LCD.” Tony Fadell, Nest CEO http://www.theverge.com/2012/4/12/2942861/nest-answers-patent-lawsuit-honeywell-troll
  61. 61 | 4/22/2012 A tiny company, has a giant company,

    that made 2 billion in profit, running scared.
  62. 62 | 4/22/2012 And it’s just a thermostat.

  63. None
  64. 64 | 4/22/2012

  65. 65 | 4/22/2012 They have 12 employees.

  66. 66 | 4/22/2012 Maybe you don’t need the organizational machine

    after all.
  67. 67 | 4/22/2012 But if you are going to challenge

    all existing norms by quitting your well-paying job, cutting your salary in half, working long hours, and taking on the institutionalized organizations of the global 2000 by starting your own company,
  68. 68 | 4/22/2012 there’s one additional norm to question, too.

  69. 69 | 4/22/2012 We all believe it’s acceptable to judge

    the quality of a design.
  70. 70 | 4/22/2012 What if we start judging the content

    of the design, too?
  71. 4/ Problems Worth Solving

  72. 72 | 4/22/2012 Meet Alex Pappas and Ruby Ku, two

    of my students. They conducted months of immersive, ethnographic research with the homeless in Austin.
  73. 73 | 4/22/2012

  74. 74 | 4/22/2012

  75. 75 | 4/22/2012

  76. 76 | 4/22/2012 “We feel that self actualization is at

    the core of what makes us human, and we observed people’s enhanced self-esteem when they share their knowledge. For homeless people to feel empowered to change their situation, we began to look at what they could teach.” Alex Pappas & Ruby Ku 2011
  77. 77 | 4/22/2012

  78. 78 | 4/22/2012 HourSchool makes money by taking a small

    percentage of class fees. They drive impact and change by empowering everyone to become teachers, irrespective of socioeconomic background.
  79. 79 | 4/22/2012 Meet Chap Ambrose and Scott Magee, two

    of my students. They also conducted months of immersive, ethnographic research with the homeless in Austin.
  80. 80 | 4/22/2012

  81. 81 | 4/22/2012 “Organized chaos”

  82. 82 | 4/22/2012 “We believe that by connecting people in

    need to the larger community, cultural change can happen. We’re building a platform that directly connects the community to those in need.” Chap Ambrose & Scott Magee 2011
  83. 83 | 4/22/2012

  84. 84 | 4/22/2012 Pocket Hotline makes money by charging for

    talk-time minutes on each hotline. They drive impact and change by providing a human voice during an emotionally difficult situation.
  85. 85 | 4/22/2012 “We feel that self actualization is at

    the core of what makes us human, and we observed people’s enhanced self- esteem when they share their knowledge. For homeless people to feel empowered to change their situation, we began to look at what they could teach.” Alex Pappas & Ruby Ku 2011 “We believe that by connecting people in need to the larger community, cultural change can happen. We’re building a platform that directly connects the community to those in need.” Chap Ambrose & Scott Magee 2011
  86. 86 | 4/22/2012 “We believe that by connecting people in

    need to the larger community, cultural change can happen. We’re building a platform that directly connects the community to those in need.” Chap Ambrose & Scott Magee 2011 “We feel that self actualization is at the core of what makes us human, and we observed people’s enhanced self- esteem when they share their knowledge. For homeless people to feel empowered to change their situation, we began to look at what they could teach.” Alex Pappas & Ruby Ku 2011
  87. 87 | 4/22/2012 Ruby, Alex, Chap and Scott leveraged insights

    in order to address symptoms of a wicked problem.
  88. 88 | 4/22/2012 Ruby, Alex, Chap and Scott leveraged insights

    in order to address symptoms of a wicked problem.
  89. “The abductive suggestion comes to us like a flash. It

    is an act of insight, although extremely fallible insight... it is the idea of putting together what we had never before dreamed of putting together which flashes the new suggestion before our contemplation.” Charles Peirce 1903
  90. The insight isn’t “in the data” – it comes from

    inside of you. That means you need to have a point of view.
  91. 91 | 4/22/2012 Ruby, Alex, Chap and Scott leveraged insights

    in order to address symptoms of a wicked problem.
  92. Well- Structured Problems Ill- Structured Problems Wicked Problems

  93. Well- Structured Problems Ill- Structured Problems Wicked Problems In a

    well structured problem, all of these are true: We can test our solution. We can identify problem, goal, and interim states. We can identify solution steps. We can identify domain knowledge. We can solve the problem while obeying the laws of nature. We can solve the problem using only practical levels of effort. Herb Simon, 1973
  94. 94 | 4/22/2012

  95. Well- Structured Problems Ill- Structured Problems Wicked Problems In an

    ill-structured problem, some of these are true: We cannot test our solution, or cannot test it easily. We cannot easily identify problem, goal, or interim states. We cannot identify all of the solution steps. We cannot identify domain knowledge (it may be tacit). We may be constrained by the laws of nature. Solutioning may outweigh practical efforts. Herb Simon, 1973
  96. None
  97. Well- Structured Problems Ill- Structured Problems Wicked Problems In a

    wicked problem, the following are true: Wicked problems have no definitive formulation. Wicked problems have no criteria upon which to determine “solving”. Solutions to wicked problems can only be good or bad. There are no complete list of applicable "moves" for a solution. There are always more than one explanation for a wicked problem. Every wicked problem is a symptom of another problem. No solution of a wicked problem has a definitive, scientific test. Every wicked problem is unique. Horst Rittel, 1973
  98. 98 | 4/22/2012 Kibera – Nairobi, Kenya Photo by Michael

    Cetaruk
  99. Well- Structured Problems Ill- Structured Problems Wicked Problems

  100. 100 | 4/22/2012 What if we start judging the content

    of the design, too?
  101. 101 | 4/22/2012

  102. 102 | 4/22/2012 These problems are not equally worth your

    time.
  103. 5/ Social Entrepreneurship

  104. 104 | 4/22/2012 Corporate, or consultancy?

  105. 105 | 4/22/2012 Corporate, or consultancy? What if you started

    your own company?
  106. 106 | 4/22/2012 Corporate, or consultancy? What if you started

    your own company? And what if you used inexpensive technology to provide a service?
  107. 107 | 4/22/2012 Corporate, or consultancy? What if you started

    your own company? And what if you used inexpensive technology to provide a service? And what if you did it in the context of social and humanitarian problems?
  108. 108 | 4/22/2012 “That sounds hard. How do I start?”

  109. 109 | 4/22/2012 You already know how.

  110. 110 | 4/22/2012 Ethnography Synthesis Prototyping

  111. 111 | 4/22/2012 Ethnography Synthesis Prototyping We usually focus our

    efforts here.
  112. 112 | 4/22/2012 Ethnography Synthesis Prototyping When you are engaged

    with wicked problems, these are more important.
  113. 113 | 4/22/2012 Ethnography requires leaving the safety of the

    studio and going out into “real life”; it’s about observing “real people” – and designing with them! Ethnography Synthesis Prototyping
  114. 114 | 4/22/2012 The goal of ethnography is to gain

    empathy and identify an opportunity space. Ethnography Synthesis Prototyping
  115. Left: Patricia Moore, ~1984 Above: Patricia Moore, ~2000

  116. 116 | 4/22/2012 Synthesis is the process of making meaning

    through inference and sensemaking. Ethnography Synthesis Prototyping
  117. 117 | 4/22/2012 Synthesis is the process of making meaning

    through inference and sensemaking. Ethnography Synthesis Prototyping
  118. abductive deductive inductive

  119. abductive deductive inductive The output is guaranteed to be true,

    if the premise is true. Jon is a Designer. All Designers are Arrogant Bastards. Therefore, Jon is an Arrogant Bastard.
  120. abductive deductive inductive The output is guaranteed to be true,

    if the premise is true. Jon is a Designer. All Designers are Arrogant Bastards. Therefore, Jon is an Arrogant Bastard. Gives good evidence that a conclusion is true. All of the designers I’ve ever seen wear black t-shirts. Therefore, the next designer I will see will be wearing a black t-shirt.
  121. abductive deductive inductive The output is guaranteed to be true,

    if the premise is true. Jon is a Designer. All Designers are Arrogant Bastards. Therefore, Jon is an Arrogant Bastard. Gives good evidence that a conclusion is true. All of the designers I’ve ever seen wear black t-shirts. Therefore, the next designer I will see will be wearing a black t-shirt. The argument from best explanation, depending on circumstances and experience: an inference. When a designer works on a project, they often draw diagrams of things. It seems to help them learn about a new topic. I’ve seen grade school students struggle to learn complex topics of math or science. I can abduct that students might be able to learn better by drawing diagrams in a classroom setting.
  122. 122 | 4/22/2012 Synthesis is the process of making meaning

    through inference and sensemaking. Ethnography Synthesis Prototyping
  123. 123 | 4/22/2012 Synthesis is the process of making meaning

    through inference and sensemaking. Ethnography Synthesis Prototyping
  124. “By sensemaking, modern researchers seem to mean something different from

    creativity, comprehension, curiosity, mental modeling, explanation, or situational awareness... Sensemaking is a motivated, continuous effort to understand connections (which can be among people, places, and events) in order to anticipate their trajectories and act effectively.” Robert Hoffman
  125. 125 | 4/22/2012 Synthesis is the process of making meaning

    through abductive sensemaking and reframing. Ethnography Synthesis Prototyping
  126. 126 | 4/22/2012 This is a process for humanizing technology.

    Ethnography Synthesis Prototyping
  127. 127 | 4/22/2012 This is a process for humanizing technology.

    Ethnography Synthesis Prototyping It’s the process of social entrepreneurship.
  128. 128 | 4/22/2012 This is a process for humanizing technology.

    Ethnography Synthesis Prototyping You already know how to do it, because it’s also the process of design.
  129. 129 | 4/22/2012 This is a process for humanizing technology.

    Ethnography Synthesis Prototyping And if you start with meaningful insights into social problems, your solution can likely be of use to everyone.
  130. 130 | 4/22/2012

  131. 131 | 4/22/2012

  132. 132 | 4/22/2012 Leave the organizational machine behind.

  133. 133 | 4/22/2012 Realize the disruptive power of design.

  134. 134 | 4/22/2012 Give yourself permission to start your own

    thing, and tackle problems worth solving.
  135. Jon Kolko Director, Austin Center for Design jkolko@ac4d.com Download our

    free book, Wicked Problems: Problems Worth Solving, at http://www.wickedproblems.com