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5-Star User Experience: What Going Out To Eat Teaches Us About UX Design

C4a7461b517faa96d1aaa4679cb89645?s=47 Jimmy Chandler
November 18, 2015

5-Star User Experience: What Going Out To Eat Teaches Us About UX Design

Presented at edUI November 10, 2015 and New York Code + Design Academy November 18, 2015.

Are you hungry for a fresh perspective on UX design? In this fun and interactive presentation, we will step outside the confines of our digital devices and explore how great restaurants meet their customers’ needs (and how other restaurants fail to do so). Looking at the principles of restaurant hospitality, we’ll discover how these principles apply to building better websites and mobile apps. We’ll discuss what great restauranteurs and great designers have in common, and we’ll generate some user experience best practices that participants can apply to existing and future designs. We’ll connect these ideas to what we know about how the human brain works and how our emotions impact our decision-making, and how we can go beyond meeting basic needs to delighting our audiences.

What You'll Learn:

- The importance of empathy and insight in design
- How to think about experiences as a series of events that can be stressful or pleasurable
- Ways to delight your users

C4a7461b517faa96d1aaa4679cb89645?s=128

Jimmy Chandler

November 18, 2015
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Transcript

  1. Jimmy Chandler @uxprinciples about.me/jimmychandler www.uxprinciples.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/jimmychandler jimmy@uxprinciples.com 5-Star User Experience:

    What Going Out To Eat Teaches Us About UX Design Presented at: 
 The New York Code + Design Academy November 18, 2015 #5StarUX
  2. PERSONA Jimmy Chandler LOCATION COMPANY ROLE Brooklyn, NY UX Principles

    UX Architect Jimmy is an independent UX Architect who works with his clients to solve complex problems by designing user-friendly and effective websites and mobile apps. His clients have included Fortune 500 companies, startups, government agencies, and non-profits. Jimmy is a frequent organizer, volunteer, coach, and speaker for UX Camp, IXDA, UXPA, Startup Weekend, and other organizations and events. Leader in the UX Community Engagement Channels Frustrations Poor design upsets me. I get frustrated with technology easily, as I know many people do. So I can empathize with their plight, and I try to help my clients delightfully engage their customers rather than make them angry. iPhone 6 MacBook Pro 15” iPad 3, Kindle Podcasts, Spotify, Youtube TV (Roku, Broadcast, no Cable) What Matters Most Least Most Design Least Most People’s Needs Least Most Technology Platform B.A. in Government College of William and Mary 18 yrs Industry Experience Jimmy Chandler | UX Principles
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  6. Image Courtesy of Shutterstock

  7. Photo courtesy Maya Jackson

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  10. Crunchy Lobster, Spicy Tuna, and Yellowtail and Scallion Rolls, Ichiban

    Sushi, McLean, VA
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  13. Most Important To You

  14. Lobster Ravioli, Fiola, Washington, DC Food

  15. Service

  16. People

  17. Most Important • Food quality (tasty) • Smell and cleanliness

    • Cost (value) • Respect our requests • Atmosphere/Noise Level • Easy to get to (parking, transit) • Accessible
  18. Managing Expectations Photo courtesy Julie Riederer Nine Types of Lasagna

    at Tommy Lasagna
  19. First Rule of UX You cannot not communicate. Every behavior

    is a kind of communication. Paul Watzlawick’s First Axiom of Communication
 Source: http://52weeksofux.com/tagged/week_1
  20. • Decide on a restaurant (research) • Make a reservation

    (phone, Opentable) • Arrive, ask for a table • Wait in the bar • Seating • Greeting, drinks? • Read menu, listen to specials • Order • Drink, eat, converse • (text/email) • Wait staff asks if everything’s ok • Restroom, smoke, phone call • Refills • Talk to Manager • Clear plates • Dessert • Request check • Decide on tip, pay • Call cab • Get coats • Exit
  21. Stress Pleasure

  22. Pleasure Stress

  23. • Decide on a restaurant (research) • Make a reservation

    (phone, Opentable) • Arrive, ask for a table • Wait in the bar • Seating • Greeting, drinks? • Read menu, listen to specials • Order • Drink, eat, converse • (text/email) • Wait staff asks if everything’s ok • Restroom, smoke, phone call • Refills • Talk to Manager • Clear plates • Dessert • Request check • Decide on tip, pay • Call cab • Get coats • Exit
  24. • Decide on a restaurant (research) • Make a reservation

    (phone, Opentable) • Arrive, ask for a table • Wait in the bar • Seating • Greeting, drinks? • Read menu, listen to specials • Order • Drink, eat, converse • (text/email) • Wait staff asks if everything’s ok • Restroom, smoke, phone call • Refills • Talk to Manager • Clear plates • Dessert • Request check • Decide on tip, pay • Call cab • Get coats • Exit
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  26. • Find the Seemless website • Type in URL, bookmark,

    search • Log in or sign up • Pick from My Order History • Or bookmarks, favorites or search • If searching, pick correct address • Delivery or Pickup? • Filter • Name, price, rating, delivery estimate • Or sort to narrow down search • Read reviews to help decision • Ask spouse what they want • Select restaurant • Select items • Tip amount • Checkout • Review order • Submit • Get confirmation email • Get food Seamless
  27. • Find the Seemless website • Type in URL, bookmark,

    search • Log in or sign up • Pick from My Order History • Or bookmarks, favorites or search • If searching, pick correct address • Delivery or Pickup? • Filter • Name, price, rating, delivery estimate • Or sort to narrow down search • Read reviews to help decision • Ask spouse what they want • Select restaurant • Select items • Tip amount • Checkout • Review order • Submit • Get confirmation email • Get food Seamless
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  33. Pan-roasted duck breast on French toast with vincotto, Blowfish Sushi,

    San Francisco Service
  34. Technical delivery of a product Pan-roasted duck breast on French

    toast with vincotto, Blowfish Sushi, San Francisco
  35. Service = usable, useful, and reliable Pan-roasted duck breast on

    French toast with vincotto, Blowfish Sushi, San Francisco
  36. Photo courtesy kowarski http://goo.gl/YoQAvC Salt Selection, Per Se, New York

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  38. Eye contact Smile Hug Food Say Hi to Baby Max!

  39. “To be on a guest’s side requires listening to that

    person with every sense, and following up with a thoughtful, gracious, appropriate response.” Dany Meyer, Setting the Table Photo Courtesy Julie Riederer, Popcorn Soup at wd~50 Hospitality
  40. How the delivery of a product makes its recipients feel.

    Photo Courtesy Julie Riederer, Popcorn Soup at wd~50
  41. Photo Courtesy Julie Riederer, Popcorn Soup at wd~50 Hospitality =

    delightful and engaging
  42. What Do UX Designers Do?

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  46. Photo Courtesy Julie Riederer, Popcorn Soup at wd~50 Hospitality =

    delightful and engaging
  47. Photo Courtesy Julie Riederer, Popcorn Soup at wd~50 “To be

    on a guest’s side requires listening to that person with every sense, and following up with a thoughtful, gracious, appropriate response.” Dany Meyer, Setting the Table
  48. Empathy The ability to understand and share the feelings of

    another. aka Emotional Empathy — Indi Young, author of Practical Empathy
  49. Cognitive Empathy An intent to understand another person: how they

    think, what their guiding principles are, what their reactions are…and how those reactions are different from your own — Indi Young, author of Practical Empathy
  50. Insight The capacity to gain an accurate and deep intuitive

    understanding of a person or thing.
  51. Mental Models “an explanation of someone's thought process about how

    something works” Source: Wikipedia
 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mental_model
  52. Stress Pleasure

  53. Pleasure Stress

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  56. "I'm not here to enter into a relationship. I just

    want to buy something." User interview
  57. http://www.uie.com/articles/three_hund_million_button/

  58. Why do we care?

  59. Emotions Help Us Make Decisions

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  65. Facebook reduced deactivation rate by 7% by changing the deactivation

    screen to note how your friends will no longer be able to keep in touch with you (with photos of selected friends) Source: Stephen P. Anderson, Seductive Interaction Design
  66. http://www.eater.com/2015/8/17/9164479/eater-upsell-bill-addison

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  68. "The product is beautiful! And fun. As a result, when

    people have difficulties, they blame themselves. Good for Apple. Bad for the customer." https://www.fastcodesign.com/3053406/how-apple-is-giving-design-a-bad-name
  69. Addressing Mistakes • Awareness • Acknowledgement • Apology • Action

    • Additional generosity Photo Courtesy Nicolette Chandler, Casa Luca, Washington, DC
  70. Best Case: Prevent Errors

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  75. If errors happen…

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  84. Review

  85. Your product is a series of interactions that cause stress

    or pleasure
  86. Good service in a restaurant = a usable, useful, and

    reliable product
  87. Restaurant hospitality = a delightful design

  88. Delightful design fulfills people’s 
 emotional needs

  89. To accomplish this requires empathy 
 and insight

  90. Insight requires data from listening and observing, not inferences

  91. Thank You! Jimmy Chandler @uxprinciples about.me/jimmychandler www.uxprinciples.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/jimmychandler jimmy@uxprinciples.com Photo

    courtesy Maya Jackson
  92. Related Reading • Aarron Walter, Designing for Emotion • Whitney

    Hess, So you wanna be a user experience designer — Step 2: Guiding Principles, http://whitneyhess.com/blog/ 2009/11/23/so-you-wanna-be-a-user- experience-designer-step-2-guiding-principles/ • Indi Young • Book: Practical Empathy • Video: https://vimeo.com/98714873 • Article:
 http://rosenfeldmedia.com/blogs/mental- models/how-to-wield-empathy/ • Don Norman, Emotional Design • Stephen P. Anderson, Seductive Interaction Design • Dana Chisnell • Beyond Frustration: Three levels of happy design http://uxmag.com/articles/beyond- frustration-three-levels-of-happy-design • Deconstructing Delight: Pleasure, Flow,& Meaning http://www.slideshare.net/ danachisnell/deconstructing-delight • Jared Spool, The $300 Million Button
 http://www.uie.com/articles/ three_hund_million_button/
  93. Recommended UX Books • Abby Covert, How To Make Sense

    Of Any Mess: Information Architecture For Everybody • Don Norman, Design of Everyday Things • Steve Krug, Don’t Make Me Think (3rd Edition) and Rocket Surgery Made Easy • Alan Cooper, About Face 4 • Russ Unger and Carolyn Chandler, A Project Guide to UX Design (2nd Edition) • Peter Morville and Louis Rosenfeld, Information Architecture For the Web and Beyond (4th Edition) • Jeff Raskin, The Humane Interface • Dan Brown, Communicating Design • Dan Saffer, Microinteractions • Jennifer Tidwell, Designing Interfaces • Lidwell, Holden & Butler, Universal Principles of Design • Quesenbery & Brooks, Storytelling for User Experience • Goodman, Kuniavsky & Moed, Observing the User Experience • Halvorson & Rach, Content Strategy for the Web, 2nd Edition • Horton & Quesenbery, A Web For Everyone
  94. Recommended UX Websites • http://52weeksofux.com • http://uxmyths.com/ • http://www.lukew.com/ff/ •

    http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/ • http://aycl.uie.com
 A library of 230 seminars by experts in all things UX design. $23 per/month • http://alistapart.com/ • http://uxmag.com/ • http://www.uxbooth.com/ • http://boxesandarrows.com • http://www.subtraction.com