Becoming a Better UX Facilitator

Becoming a Better UX Facilitator

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Bermon Painter

March 13, 2017
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  1. @BERMONPAINTER BECOMING A BETTER UX FACILITATOR

  2. 1 2 3 4 5 AGENDA BUILDING FACILITATION SKILLS MAKING

    A TOOLKIT WORKING SESSIONS > MEETINGS FAVORITE FACILITATED EXERCISES QUESTIONS BECOMING A BETTER UX FACILITATOR
  3. BUILDING FACILITATION SKILLS

  4. IDEAS

  5. RISK

  6. RISK DEVELOPMENT (WEB, MOBILE, DATA, PRODUCTIVITY)

  7. RISK DEVELOPMENT (WEB, MOBILE, DATA, PRODUCTIVITY) PROJECT SERVICES (BUSINESS ANALYSIS,

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT)
  8. RISK DEVELOPMENT (WEB, MOBILE, DATA, PRODUCTIVITY) PROJECT SERVICES (BUSINESS ANALYSIS,

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT) CLIENTS (PRODUCT OWNERS, STAKEHOLDERS)
  9. RISK DEVELOPMENT (WEB, MOBILE, DATA, PRODUCTIVITY) PROJECT SERVICES (BUSINESS ANALYSIS,

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT) CLIENTS (PRODUCT OWNERS, STAKEHOLDERS) USER EXPERIENCE (RESEARCH, USABILITY, INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE INTERACTION DESIGN, VISUAL DESIGN)
  10. RISK DEVELOPMENT (WEB, MOBILE, DATA, PRODUCTIVITY) PROJECT SERVICES (BUSINESS ANALYSIS,

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT) CLIENTS (PRODUCT OWNERS, STAKEHOLDERS) USER EXPERIENCE (RESEARCH, USABILITY, INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE INTERACTION DESIGN, VISUAL DESIGN) DESIGN (INTERACTION DESIGN, VISUAL DESIGN, MOTION DESIGN)
  11. RISK DEVELOPMENT (WEB, MOBILE, DATA, PRODUCTIVITY) PROJECT SERVICES (BUSINESS ANALYSIS,

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT) CLIENTS (PRODUCT OWNERS, STAKEHOLDERS) USER EXPERIENCE (RESEARCH, USABILITY, INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE INTERACTION DESIGN, VISUAL DESIGN) DOUBT CERTANTITY DESIGN (INTERACTION DESIGN, VISUAL DESIGN, MOTION DESIGN)
  12. NEEDED SKILLS ACTIVE LISTENING Founded on empathy Use reflective responses

    1 PLANNING Start with outcomes Consider biases Dominant participants 2 PARTICIPANT EXPERIENCE Monitor tempo Track individual involvement Look for engagement 3
  13. NEEDED SKILLS ACTIVE LISTENING Founded on empathy Use reflective responses

    1 PLANNING Start with outcomes Consider biases Dominant participants 2 PARTICIPANT EXPERIENCE Monitor tempo Track individual involvement Look for engagement 3
  14. NEEDED SKILLS ACTIVE LISTENING Founded on empathy Use reflective responses

    1 PLANNING Start with outcomes Consider biases Dominant participants 2 PARTICIPANT EXPERIENCE Monitor tempo Track individual involvement Look for engagement 3
  15. WORKING SESSIONS ARE GREATER THAN MEETINGS

  16. WORKING SESSIONS KICKOFFS 1 RESEARCH 3 DISCOVERY 5 STRATEGY 2

    IA 4 WIREFRAMING 6
  17. WORKING SESSIONS KICKOFFS 1 RESEARCH 3 DISCOVERY 5 STRATEGY 2

    IA 4 WIREFRAMING 6
  18. WORKING SESSIONS KICKOFFS 1 RESEARCH 3 DISCOVERY 5 STRATEGY 2

    IA 4 WIREFRAMING 6
  19. WORKING SESSIONS KICKOFFS 1 RESEARCH 3 DISCOVERY 5 STRATEGY 2

    IA 4 WIREFRAMING 6
  20. WORKING SESSIONS KICKOFFS 1 RESEARCH 3 DISCOVERY 5 STRATEGY 2

    IA 4 WIREFRAMING 6
  21. WORKING SESSIONS KICKOFFS 1 RESEARCH 3 DISCOVERY 5 STRATEGY 2

    IA 4 WIREFRAMING 6
  22. MAKING A TOOLKIT

  23. BUILDING A FACILITATION TOOLKIT OPEN Free flowing discussions to raise

    concerns and create shared understanding. 1 SEMI-STRUCTURED Provides some structure and prevents participants from veering too far off topic. 2 STRUCTURED Highly structured discussion divided up into hands-on, individual and group sessions. 3
  24. BUILDING A FACILITATION TOOLKIT OPEN Free flowing discussions to raise

    concerns and create shared understanding. 1 SEMI-STRUCTURED Provides some structure and prevents participants from veering too far off topic. 2 STRUCTURED Highly structured discussion divided up into hands-on, individual and group sessions. 3
  25. BUILDING A FACILITATION TOOLKIT OPEN Free flowing discussions to raise

    concerns and create shared understanding. 1 SEMI-STRUCTURED Provides some structure and prevents participants from veering too far off topic. 2 STRUCTURED Highly structured discussion divided up into hands-on, individual and group sessions. 3
  26. None
  27. FAVORITE FACILITATED EXERCISES

  28. QUICK CONSENSUS 1. DETERMINE A FOCUS QUESTION Only work on

    one focus question at a time. Pick the most important one first. • Who are our users? • What features do our users need? • What goals do users have when they use our application? • What is the biggest obstacle preventing our products from selling?
  29. QUICK CONSENSUS 2. PUT OPINIONS OR DATA ON STICKY NOTES

    Only put one opinion or piece of data per sticky. These will be done individually. Opinion Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Data Data Opinion Data Opinion Data Data Data Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Data Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Data Data Opinion Data Opinion Data
  30. QUICK CONSENSUS 3. GROUP SIMILAR IDEAS The facilitator has the

    group to start grouping like items together. Opinion Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Data Data Opinion Data Opinion Data Data Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Data Data Opinion Data Data Opinion
  31. QUICK CONSENSUS 4. LABEL EACH GROUP Assign a name to

    each group. Use a noun, don’t write sentences. Opinion Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Data Data Opinion Data Opinion Data Data Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Data Data Opinion Data Data Opinion Group Group Group Group Group Group
  32. QUICK CONSENSUS 5. VOTE ON THE IMPORTANT GROUPS INDIVIDUALLY Have

    participants repeat the question from the beginning & write down their top 3 groups. Opinion Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Data Data Opinion Data Opinion Data Data Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Data Data Opinion Data Data Opinion Group Group Group Group Group Group
  33. QUICK CONSENSUS 6. RECORD VOTES AS A GROUP Give each

    participant 6 dots and have them place them on their top 3 choices. Opinion Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Data Data Opinion Data Opinion Data Data Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Opinion Data Opinion Opinion Data Data Opinion Data Data Opinion Group Group Group Group Group Group
  34. QUICK CONSENSUS 7. RANK THE MOST IMPORTANT GROUPS Have participants

    repeat the question from the beginning & write down their top 3 groups. Group Group Group Group Group Group
  35. Group Group QUICK CONSENSUS 7. RANK THE MOST IMPORTANT GROUPS

    Have participants repeat the question from the beginning & write down their top 3 groups. Group Group Group Group
  36. Generate as many ideas as possible. 8 minutes. 8 sketches.

    CRAZY 8’s
  37. Generate as many ideas as possible. 8 minutes. 8 sketches.

    CRAZY 8’s
  38. Generate as many ideas as possible. 8 minutes. 8 sketches.

    CRAZY 8’s
  39. Strategy implies the need for change, a desire to move

    from point A to point B. Focus on customers and users, but you may also have internal challenges you want to list here too. CHALLENGES POTENTIAL QUESTIONS • What problems are you trying to solve? • What obstacles must you overcome? • What opposing forces need to be overcome to reach your desired outcome? EXAMPLES • Lack of consistency • Migration of customers • Internal constraints • Lack of consistent standards • Little or no governance
  40. Go beyond the generic goals like “be consistent.” Instead, strive

    for something more aspirational. Consider how you will impact your customers’ work and daily lives. ASPIRATIONS POTENTIAL QUESTIONS • What are the ideal desired outcomes? • What do you want to achieve? • What experience do you want to deliver? • How does your solutions transform what they’re capable of doing? EXAMPLES • Unification of experiences • Accelerated adoption • Market recognition • Transformational impact on users
  41. Strategy is about trade-offs. Indicating your focus areas helps concentrate

    effort on the things that matter most. Note this doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll be ignoring everything else not listed, just that the elements listed here are of higher priority FOCUS AREAS POTENTIAL QUESTIONS • What is the scope of the strategy? • Who will use your solution? • What will you focus on for the most impact? • What products, services, platforms, and technologies are included in the strategy? • What are some key scenarios of use? EXAMPLES • A specific service or subset of a service • Use cases and scenarios • Learnability • Discoverability
  42. This is perhaps the trickiest but most important part. The

    guiding principle indicates how you’ll win against competitors. The guiding principles are the approaches you’ll take to overcome the challenges and solve the problems you’re facing GUIDING PRINCIPLES POTENTIAL QUESTIONS • How will you overcome the challenges? • What specific mantras will guide teams to consistently execute towards the same goal? • How will you get everybody moving the same direction? EXAMPLES • Particular Sequence of activities • Approach to persuasion • Coordination of touch points • Differentiation play
  43. This section shouldn’t read like project plan, rather it’s an

    inventory of the types of activities required to reach your aspirations. Keep in mind you may need new capabilities to execute your strategy. ACTIVITIES POTENTIAL QUESTIONS • What types of activities solve the problems? • What capabilities achieve your aspirations? EXAMPLES • Research methods • Design activities • Prototyping and testing • Skill development
  44. Ultimately, your measurements should support the business goals. Try to

    find metrics that show the positive impact the effort has on business. Be specific with goals. MEASUREMENT POTENTIAL QUESTIONS • How can you show progress and success? • What types of measurements will you employ? • What metrics will be used to gauge success? EXAMPLES • Increase in user satisfaction • Decrease time to market • Improve maintainability • Better task completion • Higher frequency of use • Increased self-support
  45. Strategy emerges from experimentation towards a goal to prove value.

    VISION CANVAS 1. VISION Ultimate view of where the business line is going. Think long term. In will be . TIME FRAME COMPANY VISION STATEMENT 2. CHALLENGE The first business goal that must be achieved to accomplish the vision. Focus on ideal states, objectives, and KPIs. In order to reach our vision, we must by . MEASUREABLE OBJECTIVE TIME FRAME 3. TARGET CONDITION The first, smaller, measurable objective to explore now. In order to reach our Challenge, first we must MEASUREABLE OBJECTIVE 4. CURRENT STATE The reality compared to the Target Condition. After measuring, we know our current state is MEASUREABLE STATE
  46. Who is going to use this product? PERSONAS

  47. Who is going to use this product? PERSONAS DRAW A

    FACE GIVE A NAME BEHAVIORS NEEDS/GOALS HOW WILL WE SERVE? ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES
  48. Who is going to use this product? PERSONAS DRAW A

    FACE GIVE A NAME BEHAVIORS NEEDS/GOALS HOW WILL WE SERVE? ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES
  49. Who is going to use this product? PERSONAS DRAW A

    FACE GIVE A NAME BEHAVIORS NEEDS/GOALS HOW WILL WE SERVE? ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES
  50. Who is going to use this product? PERSONAS DRAW A

    FACE GIVE A NAME BEHAVIORS NEEDS/GOALS HOW WILL WE SERVE? ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES
  51. Who is going to use this product? PERSONAS DRAW A

    FACE GIVE A NAME BEHAVIORS NEEDS/GOALS HOW WILL WE SERVE? ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES
  52. FRAMEWORK FOR BRAINSTORMING PRODUCTS USER STORY MAPPING 1. TELL A

    STORY The story is simply a list of steps or actions that the hypothetical user you’re designing for makes during a specific timeframe. ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION
  53. FRAMEWORK FOR BRAINSTORMING PRODUCTS USER STORY MAPPING 2. GROUP THE

    ACTIONS Actions should be grouped to help us understand which parts of the story we’re discussing. ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION GROUP NAME GROUP NAME GROUP NAME
  54. PERSONA PERSONA PERSONA FRAMEWORK FOR BRAINSTORMING PRODUCTS USER STORY MAPPING

    3. ASSIGN PERSONAS Assign the appropriate personas that would interact with various pieces of the story. You will have duplicates. ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION GROUP ACTION GROUP ACTION GROUP ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTI ACTION GROUP PERSONA PERSONA PERSONA PERSONA
  55. PERSONA PERSONA PERSONA FRAMEWORK FOR BRAINSTORMING PRODUCTS USER STORY MAPPING

    4. BRAINSTORM IDEAS Break the story down into tasks and user interface details. Don’t be afraid to split ideas, rewrite, and reorganize. ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION GROUP ACTION GROUP ACTION GROUP ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTI ACTION GROUP PERSONA PERSONA PERSONA PERSONA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDE IDE
  56. PERSONA PERSONA PERSONA FRAMEWORK FOR BRAINSTORMING PRODUCTS USER STORY MAPPING

    5. PRIORITIZE IDEAS Break the story down into tasks and user interface details. Don’t be afraid to split ideas, rewrite, and reorganize. ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION GROUP ACTION GROUP ACTION GROUP ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTION ACTI ACTION GROUP PERSONA PERSONA PERSONA PERSONA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDE IDE
  57. OPTIONAL PRIORITIZATION EXERCISE WHEN NEEDED VALUE/EFFORT PRIORITIZATION VALUE EFFORT LOW

    HIGH LOW HIGH
  58. OPTIONAL PRIORITIZATION EXERCISE WHEN NEEDED VALUE/EFFORT PRIORITIZATION VALUE EFFORT LOW

    HIGH LOW HIGH IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA
  59. OPTIONAL PRIORITIZATION EXERCISE WHEN NEEDED VALUE/EFFORT PRIORITIZATION VALUE EFFORT LOW

    HIGH LOW HIGH IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA DANGER ZONE IGNORE THESE
  60. OPTIONAL PRIORITIZATION EXERCISE WHEN NEEDED VALUE/EFFORT PRIORITIZATION VALUE EFFORT LOW

    HIGH LOW HIGH IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA LOW HANGING
  61. OPTIONAL PRIORITIZATION EXERCISE WHEN NEEDED VALUE/EFFORT PRIORITIZATION VALUE EFFORT LOW

    HIGH LOW HIGH IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA DANGER ZONE BREAK THESE DOWN
  62. OPTIONAL PRIORITIZATION EXERCISE WHEN NEEDED VALUE/EFFORT PRIORITIZATION VALUE EFFORT LOW

    HIGH LOW HIGH IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA FOCUS HERE
  63. QUESTIONS