How to Write a Talking Point

How to Write a Talking Point

Of all the documents in the realm of business writing, this one is the most ambiguous.

1ce0eb06fd6a9e9566a0cb310cfee635?s=128

Jonathan Rick

April 14, 2020
Tweet

Transcript

  1. 2.

    “When somebody asks for key messages, there’s a whole range

    of things he might have in mind. Some people want a half-dozen words scribbled on page, others want key phrases and messaging, and a few imagine talking points to be about two adjectives short of a full speech. Of all the documents in the realm of business writing, this one is the most ambiguous.” —Mike Long
  2. 4.

    Also known as a “key message” or “takeaway.” Identifies a

    “leitmotif,” or a “recurring theme.” Must be essential.
  3. 6.

    not this way Email Coach. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet,

    an evertitur rationibus his, ut vix veri facer, at has scaevola hendrerit. Pri et euripidis temporibus, ut eum verear phaedrum. Vis erant dolore mnesarchum ea.
  4. 7.

    not this way Email Coach. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet,

    an evertitur rationibus his, ut vix veri facer, at has scaevola hendrerit. Pri et euripidis temporibus, ut eum verear phaedrum. Vis erant dolore mnesarchum ea. this way Think of SEND As Your Email Coach. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, an evertitur rationibus his, ut vix veri facer, at has scaevola hendrerit. Pri et euripidis temporibus, ut eum verear phaedrum. Vis erant dolore mnesarchum ea.
  5. 9.

    a point about the book This Is an Important Book.

    You should read it because its subject — email — is something you likely do dozens of times every day.
  6. 10.

    a point from the book Email Etiquette Is More Important

    Than You Think. If you’re like most people, you likely send and receive dozens of emails every day. Yet rarely do we pause to consider our tone and style — or etiquette — in these messages. SEND will help you to grasp and master these seemingly small nuances, which can make you look like a pro or a fool. a point about the book This Is an Important Book. You should read it because its subject — email — is something you likely do dozens of times every day.
  7. 12.

    multiple messages Email Lacks Tone; You Must Create It. With

    email, there’s no universal default tone; if you don’t consciously create tone, the reader will project his own prejudices and anxieties onto your message. How do you create tone? The exclamation point may be lazy, but it’s effective. Indeed, because of email’s inherent affectlessness, a little flattery never hurts, and it’s sometimes necessary to be extravagantly polite.
  8. 13.

    multiple messages Email Lacks Tone; You Must Create It. With

    email, there’s no universal default tone; if you don’t consciously create tone, the reader will project his own prejudices and anxieties onto your message. How do you create tone? The exclamation point may be lazy, but it’s effective. Indeed, because of email’s inherent affectlessness, a little flattery never hurts, and it’s sometimes necessary to be extravagantly polite. one message Email Lacks Tone; You Must Create It. If you want an email to be read a certain way, it’s your job to make sure this happens. Never assume a recipient will interpret your message the way it sounded in your head. Instead, strip your tone of all ambiguity.
  9. 15.

    general + specific A Good Subject Line Can Make or

    Break an Email. Most people waste their subject lines, by treating them as an afterthought. If, instead, you treat them as an opportunity, your emails will draw more responses, faster. The best subject lines are like ESP: They’re engaging, specific, and personal. Strive for at least two of these qualities every time you click “Send.”
  10. 16.

    general + specific A Good Subject Line Can Make or

    Break an Email. Most people waste their subject lines, by treating them as an afterthought. If, instead, you treat them as an opportunity, your emails will draw more responses, faster. The best subject lines are like ESP: They’re engaging, specific, and personal. Strive for at least two of these qualities every time you click “Send.” specific Make Your Subject Line “ESP.” Do you want your emails to be over- looked? Then use generic subject lines such as “Meeting.” Want your messages to get read? Then write something like this: “We’re meeting today at 4 PM.” The difference? The latter follows the “ESP” trick: It’s engaging, it’s specific, and it’s personal.