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Everything You Wanted to Know About Wikipedia But Were Too Embarrassed to Ask

Everything You Wanted to Know About Wikipedia But Were Too Embarrassed to Ask

Here’s a paradox: Everyone wants a Wikipedia page for themselves, their C.E.O., or their organization, yet few people know what it takes to create one.

In this workshop, I’ll explain how to bridge that gap. Specifically, we’ll run down the six rules of Wikipedia sourcing.

Jonathan Rick
PRO

October 11, 2022
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Transcript

  1. EVERYTHING YOU WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT WIKIPEDIA BUT WERE TOO

    EMBARRASSED TO ASK
  2. MY CREDENTIALS

  3. The Continental Pool Lounge Arlington, Virginia 2007

  4. 15 That’s how many years I’ve been helping clients navigate

    Wikipedia.
  5. 5 That’s how many services I offer. 1. Create 2.

    Edit 3. Consult 4. Monitor 5. Train
  6. WHY WIKIPEDIA MATTERS

  7. Reason #1

  8. Reason #1

  9. Reason #2

  10. Reason #3

  11. The Bottom Line

  12. WHAT DO YOU WANT TO DO?

  13. Are you “notable”? CREATE EDIT Are your sources “reliable”?

  14. THE 6 RULES OF SOURCING

  15. MEDIA COVERAGE

  16. CRITERION #1 The Coverage Must Come From a Media Outlet

  17. Press Release Your Website Your Bio on a Speaker’s Bureau

    Nope
  18. Newspapers Magazines Wire Services Yep

  19. Television Radio Podcasts Nope

  20. Does this mean that all broadcast hits are banned? No.

    WAIT!
  21. Television

  22. Podcasts

  23. Blogs Newsletters Nope

  24. Letters From an American HEATHER COX RICHARDSON TK News MATT

    TAIBBI Common Sense BARIWEISS Noahpinion NOAH SMITH Substack
  25. None
  26. CRITERION #2 Both the Outlet and the Content Must Be

    Independent From You
  27. Kindle Direct Publishing The American Marketing Association FreeEnterprise.com O utlets

  28. Content

  29. Forbes

  30. Q&As Content

  31. Is a blanket ban on interviews fair? WAIT!

  32. Q &As

  33. CRITERION #3 The Media Outlet Must Be Notable

  34. ARLnow.com Patch Local Pubs

  35. The Executive Communication Report The Washington Business Journal P.R. Daily

    Nextgov Trade Pubs
  36. The Mainstream Media

  37. An outlet should have a reputation for fact-checking and accuracy.

    In general, the more people engaged in the following three activities, the more reliable the publication: Ø checking facts Ø analyzing legal issues Ø scrutinizing the writing “Reliable Sources” (1)
  38. To be part of the mainstream media, an outlet needs

    to do three things: 1. employ editors 2. disclose conflicts of interest 3. issue corrections when it makes a mistake “Reliable Sources” (2)
  39. CRITERION #4 The Coverage Must Focus on You

  40. What about an article that quotes you — even extensively

    — or cites your work? WAIT!
  41. CRITERION #5 The Coverage Must Be Available Online

  42. Once you identify coverage that meets the foregoing criteria, then

    you need to track down the original link. “No Original Research”
  43. CRITERION #6 The Coverage Must Be Sustained

  44. You need to demonstrate that your media coverage isn’t only

    significant; it’s also sustained. “Recentism”
  45. The same principle applies if your clips overwhelm- ingly come

    from your association with one external event — even if that event spans multiple years. “Notable For Only One Event”
  46. “Wikipedia’s stated goal is to be an encyclopedia, not a

    newspaper, which generally means the project should focus on the information that will be historically significant for the long term.” —STEPHEN HARRISON “Wikipedia Is Not a Newspaper”
  47. APPENDIX A Cheat Sheet

  48. Source Significant? Independent? Reliable? Pass /Fail? Is the coverage of

    you in the given article significant? Being cited or even quoted a few times in an article is not particularly helpful. Being quoted extensively is better, but still not a deal maker. What you’re looking for are full-fledged profiles where you’re the focus. Is the publication completely independent from you? This rules out news releases, sponsored content, and Q&As. Does the publication have a reputation for fact- checking and accuracy? Does it employ editors, disclose conflicts of interest, and issue corrections when it makes a mistake?
  49. Source Significant? Independent? Reliable? Pass /Fail? Is the coverage of

    you in the given article significant? Being cited or even quoted a few times in an article is not particularly helpful. Being quoted extensively is better, but still not a deal maker. What you’re looking for are full-fledged profiles where you’re the focus. Is the publication completely independent from you? This rules out news releases, sponsored content, and Q&As. Does the publication have a reputation for fact- checking and accuracy? Does it employ editors, disclose conflicts of interest, and issue corrections when it makes a mistake? Michael M. Grynbau, “Justin and Ben Smith Pick a Name For Their Media Start-Up,” New York Times, March 22, 2022. Yes Yes Yes Pass
  50. QUESTIONS YOU DIDN’T KNOW WERE QUESTIONS

  51. QUESTION #1 Isn’t Media Coverage a Flawed Gold Standard?

  52. QUESTION #2 Can’t I Just Do This Myself?

  53. QUESTION #3 How Does the Submission Process Work?

  54. QUESTION #4 Why Does the Page for X Do Something

    That Violates Wikipedia’s Rules?
  55. Should We Chat? hi@jonathanrick.com