Social Design

Social Design

I conduct a workshop on Social Design & Design for Social Impact at Design and Business Schools. This one was conducted at the India campus of Lécole de design Nantes Atlantique, in Bangalore, with the students of the Transcultural Design class.

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Kshitiz Anand

May 21, 2013
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Transcript

  1. SOCIAL DESIGN Design for the other 90% Lecture delivered during

    the ‘Social Design Workshop’ held on MAY 21, 2013 Transcultural Design class, Lécole de design Nantes Atlantique (India Campus) Bangalore @kshitiz, Kshitiz@happyhorizons.in
  2. SOCIAL DESIGN Kshitiz ANAND @kshitiz Design for the other 90%

  3. 90% of a designer’s time is spent on the richest

    10% - Paul Polak
  4. CAN DESIGNERS CHANGE (IMPROVE) THE WORLD?

  5. Y ! D f r !

  6. Design has become the most powerful tool with which man

    shapes his tools and environments (and, by extension, society and himself) - Victor J Papanek, Design for the Real world
  7. WHAT IS COMMON?

  8. WHAT IS SOCIAL DESIGN

  9. The foremost intent of social design is the satisfaction of

    human needs. The broad objective of social design is to improve ‘social quality’.
  10. DESIGN for WANT DESIGN for NEED

  11. THE NEED?

  12. UN Millennium DEVELOPMENT GOALS h"p://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/  

  13. WHAT AM I TALKING ABOUT ? 2.2 million people globally

    each year die due to _______?
  14. WHAT AM I TALKING ABOUT ? 2.2 million people globally

    each year die due to Diarrhoea h"p://www.who.int/water_sanita6on_health/diseases/diarrhoea/en/  
  15. h"p://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/  

  16. EVIDENCES? There  are  a  lot  of  individuals,  companies  working  on

     this  now  and  they  span  across  sectors    
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  32. h"p://www.slideshare.net/kshi6z/design-­‐u-­‐turn-­‐from-­‐want-­‐to-­‐need  

  33. Human centered design IS AT THE HEART OF SOCIAL DESIGN

  34. ARGUE Have ‘Design Thinking’ and ‘Social Innovation’ become permanently intertwined?

  35. UNDERSTAND LIFEWORLDS - Edmund Husserl introduced the concept of the

    lifeworld in his ’Crisis of European Sciences’ (1936)
  36. Lifeworld: (German Lebenswelt) h"p://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lifeworld   A state of affairs in

    which the world is experienced, the world is lived. A universe of what is self-evident or given. Cannot be understood in a purely static manner as all things appear as themselves and meaningful.
  37. This collective inter-subjective pool of perceiving, is both universally present

    and, for humanity's purposes, capable of arriving at 'objective truth,' or at least as close to objectivity as possible. Lifeworld: (German Lebenswelt)
  38. Research perspectives

  39. 1.  Phenomenological 2.  Epistemological 3.  Sociological

  40. Phenomenological (- Husserl & Schütz) - see the lifeworld to

    be the study of the structures of subjective experience and consciousness -  to understand that we each individualistic, “I-the-man” and all of us together, belong to the world as living with one another in the world - the world is our world, valid for our consciousness as existing precisely through this 'living together.’
  41. Phenomenological (- Husserl & Schütz) - One has to place

    oneself in a context comprised of the various others and the collective shared experience of individuals and objects. - It is therefore not about the individual ego of the designer; rather we, in living together, that we understand the world. WHAT IT MEANS
  42. Individual (subjective) understanding of the lifeworld   Lifeworld  

  43. Sociological (- Habermas) -  Viewpoint of an objective reality of

    the society, taking account the social and material environmental conditions and their relevance -The view of the lifeworld is more or less the "background" environment of competences, practices, and attitudes representable in terms of one's cognitive horizon -lifeworld as consisting of socially and culturally sedimented linguistic meanings
  44. Sociological (- Habermas) WHAT IT MEANS - the focus here

    thus is not on the consciousness of the individual, but to understand the practical rationality that is being governed by the rules of that system - Social coordination and systemic regulation occur by means of shared practices, beliefs, values, superstitions, alternate and parallel governing bodies and structures
  45. Individual (subjective) understanding of the lifeworld   Rules of governing

    Practices Beliefs Superstitions Agreements Lifeworld   View from the rules of the system Towards an objective reality Of that what is agreed upon and governed by and followed
  46. Epistemological - touches upon the notion of ‘life conditions’ as

    a further reference point to understanding the social space. - life conditions include material and immaterial living circumstances as for example employment situation, availability of material resources, housing conditions, social environment (friends, foes, relatives, etc.) as well as the persons physical condition.
  47. WHAT IT MEANS - It is entrusted on top of

    the lifeworld and the Social and material environment conditions. Epistemological
  48. Individual (subjective) understanding of the lifeworld   Understanding the life

    conditions that are a result of the rules and the individual’s positioning in the lifeworld Viewing within and Of Life Conditions   Rules of governing Practices Beliefs Superstitions Agreements Life conditions  
  49. BELIEVE IN WHAT YOU SEE IN WHAT YOU HEAR IN

    WHAT YOU FEEL IN WHAT YOU EXPERIENCE
  50. INSPIRE IDEATE IMPLEMENT

  51. WICKED PROBLEMS - Rittel & Webber [ 1973] With social

    design you would run into Wicked Problems
  52. “Some problems are so complex that you have to be

    highly intelligent and well informed just to be undecided about them.” - Laurence J. Peter
  53. It is a class of social system problems, which are

    •  ill-formulated, •  the information is confusing, •  there are many clients and decision makers with conflicting values, •  the ramifications of the whole system are thoroughly confusing, •  it is messy, circular, and aggressive, extraordinarily difficult to categorize or define. CHARACTERISTICS
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  55. DEFINING WICKED PROBLEMS IS IN ITSELF A WICKED PROBLEM

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  61. ALL PROBLEMS ARE OPPORTUNITIES IN DISGUISE

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  64. Multiple starting points and often no clear end mark the

    characteristics of wicked problems as the solution are intermingled with another problem within the same social space and share a causal relation to each other Anand  K,  Haag  J;  “A  framework  for  teaching  Design  for  Social  Impact  ,  Feb  2013    
  65. COMMUNICATE COLLABORATE CREATE

  66. RESEARCH AGENDA

  67. CONTEXT •  Understand context properly •  Talk to and study

    different stakeholders
  68. IDENTIFY •  Large problem space •  Small problems in large

    problem space and how they connect with each other
  69. USER GROUPS •  Identify different user groups •  Differentiate between

    target group and affected group
  70. Empathize •  Remember cultural rules •  Do not hurt sentiments

  71. ANALYSIS

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  73. CREATE SOLUTIONS Do not make just some noise

  74. CREATE SOLUTIONS Break patterns & set norms Change systems

  75. INCLUSION Design with (not for) to create change

  76. INCLUSION Design with input and involvement of beneficiaries

  77. QUESTION How can things be better?

  78. MEASURE The outcomes of the work done and not just

    rely on Outputs
  79. h"p://www.slideshare.net/CharlesGYF/six-­‐habits-­‐of-­‐social-­‐entrepreneurs  

  80. h"p://www.slideshare.net/CharlesGYF/six-­‐habits-­‐of-­‐social-­‐entrepreneurs  

  81. IDEATION

  82. Product

  83. Product in system Anand  K,  Haag  J;  “A  framework  for

     teaching  Design  for  Social  Impact  ,  Feb  2013    
  84. DCI: Divergence – Convergence - Integration   Anand  K,  Haag

     J;  “A  framework  for  teaching  Design  for  Social  Impact  ,  Feb  2013    
  85. System-Product Harmonization   Anand  K,  Haag  J;  “A  framework  for

     teaching  Design  for  Social  Impact  ,  Feb  2013    
  86. Social Design process   Anand  K,  Haag  J;  “A  framework

     for  teaching  Design  for  Social  Impact  ,  Feb  2013    
  87. MEASURING IMPACT

  88. a) Short term b) Long term

  89. a) Tangible b) Intangible

  90. THANK YOU Email: kshitiz@happyhorizons.in Twitter: @kshitiz