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Help! I need to give a workshop!

Help! I need to give a workshop!

Workshop on how to give workshops for GitHub Education Field Day.

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@mozzadrella

October 13, 2017
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Transcript

  1. 1 Instructional Design 101 How to ship workshops that work.

    photo credits Mozilla Foundation
  2. 2 Hi, I’m Vanessa/ @mozzadrella. A.k.a “Joe Nash” but for

    teachers.
  3. 3 Anyone have this problem?

  4. 4 Or this problem?

  5. 5 Let’s fix that… Which skill should folks master? Develop

    learning objectives Choose a project (a “performance of understanding”) that shows they’ve mastered that objective. Design an assessment Content, exercises, support that will help them reach the assessment. Select relevant activities
  6. 6 Design for Understanding: a framework for teaching things to

    humans Which skill should folks master? Develop learning objectives Choose a project that shows they’ve mastered that objective, set criteria for success. Design an assessment Content, exercises, support that will help them reach the assessment. Select relevant activities
  7. 7 Why? Vanessa, that seems like a lot of work.

    Here’s what saves you time and effort: Starting with the performance of understanding builds a project-based experience. APPLICATION, NOT RECALL START WITH LEARNER NEEDS FOCUS YOUR ACTIVITIES Students want to learn a discrete thing. Value to learner in this framework is clear. Easily determine which new content and exercises are in bounds and out.. 1 2 3
  8. 8 Students will understand that..." and list essential questions that

    will guide the learner to understanding. - Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins, Understanding by Design (1998) Learning objectives: what will they master?
  9. Learning objectives ! Install and maintain a Stellar validator !

    Master direct database connections with Stellar ! Sync with the network ! Maintain a quorum set
  10. None
  11. 11 Your learning objective Produce an origami sculpture. Use the

    appropriate vocabulary to describe the origami sculpture. Solve related math problems. http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/3841 Example: Geometry acute angles.
  12. 12 What will they make to show they’ve met the

    learning objective? What are the criteria for a successful project? How will they articulate what they’ve learned? Assessment: how will they show they are masters?
  13. 13 What is a good project?

  14. 14 What are the criteria for mastery?

  15. 15 Produce an origami sculpture. Use the appropriate vocabulary to

    describe the origami sculpture. Solve related math problems. Example: Geometry acute angles. Creation of an origami sculpture scored by the rubric. Students explain the sequence of folding the sculpture. Correct solution(s) of the follow- up math questions. Example: Criteria for successful sculpture Your assessment
  16. 16 Activities: the right stuff for the goal.

  17. 17 Spectrogram 1. Ask a controversial question related to your

    learning goal. 2. Humans move along the continuum to signal their point of view. 3. Share out to hear different options on the matter.
  18. 18 Spectrogram

  19. 19 Speedgeeking 1. Speedgeeking is a way to collaboratively set

    a vision for the workshop day. 2. Line participants up in two lines, have them face each other. 3. Introduce yourself to the person in front of you, share what you want to get out of the day. 4. The line on the right advances one person forward every 30 seconds.
  20. 20 Think, pair, share 1. People are shy. Break the

    ice by asking your workshop questions for people to think about privately first. 2. Then, they turn to their neighbor to discuss. 3. Then they can optionally share out with the larger group.
  21. 21 Make the quilt This is a great way to

    get everyone to build criteria for what makes a successful project. 1. Ask people to find an excellent example of a successful project. 2. Ask them to document what makes it good. 3. Build a collaborative rubric together to assess future projects.
  22. 22 Build as you go “Build as you go” is

    a great technique for iterating on a project over the course of the workshop. 1. Ask learners about a project idea they want to work on. 2. Introduce new perspectives, or increased complexity over each phase. 3. Ask learners to revisit or revise their idea in light of the new concept. 4. FYI the worksheet for this workshop is “Build as you go.”
  23. 23 Produce an origami sculpture. Use the appropriate vocabulary to

    describe the origami sculpture. Solve related math problems. Example: Geometry acute angles. Creation of an origami sculpture scored by the rubric. Students explain the sequence of folding the sculpture. Correct solution(s) of the follow- up math questions. Example: Criteria for successful sculpture Your activity Have students describe the folding process using geometric terms, e.g., faces, symmetry, edges, rectangle, triangle, etc. as they apply to your chosen Origami. Example: Think, pair share for the creation process.
  24. 24 Ask @mozzadrella @mozzadrella mozzadrella@github.com

  25. Design your workshop ACTIVITY GOAL Which skill should folks master?

    Make it crispy and concrete. ASSESSMENT How will you know they’ve mastered it? What will they be able to make? Choose an activity that will kickstart their understanding. SPECTOGRAM THINK * PAIR * SHARE MAKE THE QUILT BUILD AS YOU GO @MOZZADRELLA
  26. Tips, tricks and hacks. MAKE A WORKSHEET PERSONAL SEATING CHART

    1. When people go around and introduce themselves, draw a sketch of the table and write their names around it. 2. That way you’ll have a cheat sheet of their names, and they will feel included. 1. Print the darn thing out and bring copies with you. 2. Include your name and contact info on the sheet. 3. Working on pen and paper keeps people focused, and they have a concrete takeaway to reference later. BE THE WELCOME WAGON 1. Stand by the door and say hi to people as they come in. Ask why they came. 2. Reference those particular pain points or examples in your workshop. @MOZZADRELLA