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Early Renaissance Italy

3700411ae81a5ba151f9946dcb59c386?s=47 nichsara
January 26, 2012

Early Renaissance Italy

Lecture given Thursday January 26, 2012

3700411ae81a5ba151f9946dcb59c386?s=128

nichsara

January 26, 2012
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  1. Early  Renaissance  Italy   Reading   Stokstad,  592-­‐629.    

    Range   c.  1400-­‐1500   Early  Italian  Renaissance     Terms/Concepts   humanism,  guild,  lost  wax   casAng,  linear  perspecAve,  holy   trinity,  aedicula,  orthoganal,   tempera,  fresco,  allegory,  heroic   (classical)  nudity,  contrapposto   Monument  List     Filippo  Brunelleschi,  Dome  of   Santa  Maria  del  Fiore   (Florence  Cathedral) 1420-­‐1436  (dome  completed   under  Brunelleschi)      Donatello,  David,  1446-­‐1460.     Masaccio,  Trinity  with  the   Virgin,  St.  John  the  Evangelist,   and  Donors,  1425-­‐1427/1428.     Sandro  BoQcelli,  Primavera,   1482.     Fra  Angelico,  AnnunciaFon,   1438-­‐1445.  
  2. None
  3. Nanni  di  Banco,  Four   Saints,  Orsanmichele,   Florence,  1410-­‐1416.

      A  guild  sculptor’s  workshop  
  4. Filippo  Brunelleschi,  Sacrifice  of   Isaac,  compeAAon  entry  for  the

      BapAstery  Doors  of  Florence   Cathedral,  1401-­‐1402.   Lorenzo  GhiberA,  Sacrifice  of  Isaac,   compeAAon  entry  for  the  BapAstery   Doors  of  Florence  Cathedral,   1401-­‐1402.  
  5. “God’s  Bankers”  

  6. "I  think  it  casts  a  brilliant  light  on  our  estate

     [pubic   reputaAon]  and  it  seems  to  me  that  the  monies  were  well   spent  and  I  am  very  pleased  with  this.”  ~Lorenzo  “il   MagnificenA”  de’  Medici   The  City  of  Florence.  
  7. Filippo  Brunelleschi,  Dome  of  Santa  Maria  del  Fiore  (Florence  

    Cathedral),  1367  (cathedral  begun  under  another  architect)  1420-­‐1436   (dome  completed  under  Brunelleschi),  1471  (lantern  added).  
  8. Filippo  Brunelleschi,  Dome  of  Santa  Maria  del  Fiore  (Florence  

    Cathedral),  1367  (cathedral  begun  under  another  architect)  1420-­‐1436   (dome  completed  under  Brunelleschi),  1471  (lantern  added).  
  9. Pantheon,  Rome,  Built  under  Hadrian,  125-­‐128  CE.  

  10. Pantheon,  Rome,  Built  under  Hadrian,  125-­‐128  CE.  

  11. Filippo  Brunelleschi,  Dome  of  Santa  Maria  del  Fiore  (Florence  

    Cathedral),  1367  (cathedral  begun  under  another  architect)  1420-­‐1436   (dome  completed  under  Brunelleschi),  1471  (lantern  added).  
  12. “Double  Dome”  Plan   Filippo  Brunelleschi,  Dome  of  Santa  Maria

     del  Fiore  (Florence   Cathedral),  1367  (cathedral  begun  under  another  architect)  1420-­‐1436   (dome  completed  under  Brunelleschi),  1471  (lantern  added).   Brunelleschi’s  Reverse  Gear  
  13. Donatello,  David,  1446-­‐1460   Goliath  =  Milan   David  =

     Florence   The  victor  is  whoever  defends  the  fatherland.   All-­‐powerful  God  crushes  the  angry  enemy.   Behold,  a  boy  overcomes  the  great  tyrant.   Conquer,  O  ciAzens!  
  14. Donatello,  David,  1446-­‐1460   Laurel  Wreath  =  Victory  

  15. Donatello,  David,  1446-­‐1460  

  16. Donatello,  David,  1446-­‐1460   “Riace  Warrior,”  Greece,  5th  Century  

    BCE   “Heroic”  Nudity   Lost-­‐Wax  CasAng  
  17. Donatello,  David,  1446-­‐1460  

  18. Donatello,  David,  1446-­‐1460  

  19. Donatello,  David,  1446-­‐1460  

  20. Donatello,  David,  1446-­‐1460  

  21. Donatello,  David,  1446-­‐1460  

  22. Donatello,  David,  1446-­‐1460  

  23. Donatello,  David,  1446-­‐1460   Feather  

  24. Donatello,   David,   1446-­‐1460.   Andrea  del   Verrocchio,

      David,  1465.  
  25. Cubiculum  M,  Boscoreale,  Italy,  40  BCE   Masaccio,  Trinity  with

     the  Virgin,  St.  John   the  Evangelist,  and  Donors,   1425-­‐1427/1428.  
  26. Coffers   Corinthian  Capital   Ionic  Capital   Key  Meander

      Architrave  with  denAl  or  tooth  moAf   Masaccio,  Trinity  with  the  Virgin,  St.  John  the  Evangelist,  and  Donors,   1425-­‐1427/1428.  
  27. Masaccio,  Trinity  with  the  Virgin,  St.  John  the  Evangelist,  and

     Donors,   1425-­‐1427/1428.  
  28. Masaccio,  Trinity  with  the  Virgin,  St.  John  the  Evangelist,  and

     Donors,   1425-­‐1427/1428.  
  29. Masaccio,  Trinity  with  the  Virgin,  St.  John  the  Evangelist,  and

     Donors,   1425-­‐1427/1428.  
  30. “I  was  once  what  you  are,  what  I  am  you

     also  will  be.”   Masaccio,  Trinity  with  the  Virgin,  St.  John  the  Evangelist,  and  Donors,   1425-­‐1427/1428.  
  31. “God’s  Bankers”  

  32. Sandro  BoQcelli,  Primavera,  1482.   Mercury   Three  Graces  

    Venus   Mercury  +  Venus  =  Cupid   Flora   Zephyrus   Chloris  
  33. Sandro  BoQcelli,  Primavera,  1482.   Lorenzo  di  Pierfranceso  de  Medici

      Semiramide  Appiani  
  34. Sandro  BoQcelli,  Primavera,  1482.  

  35. Sandro  BoQcelli,  Primavera,  1482.   Mercury   Three  Graces  

    Venus   Mercury  +  Venus  =  Cupid   Flora   Zephyrus   Chloris  
  36. Sandro  BoQcelli,  Primavera,  1482.   “Zephyrus  caught  sight  of  

    me,  I  avoided  him,  he   followed,  I  took  flight;  he  was   stronger…”  –Flora  in  Ovid’s   FasF   “I  enjoy  eternal  spring,  a   radient  season..At  the   heart  of  the  land  my  dowry   lies  a  ferAle  garden  in  the   mildest  of  climates…My   noble  husband  filled  it  with   flowers,  saying:  ‘You,  o   goddess,  shall  rule  over  the   flowers!’”    –Flora  in  Ovid’s  FasF  
  37. Sandro  BoQcelli,  Primavera,  1482.   Mercury   Three  Graces  

    Venus   Mercury  +  Venus  =  Cupid   Flora   Zephyrus   Chloris  
  38. A  PainAng  from  Pompeii,  1st  Century  CE   Sandro  BoQcelli,

     Primavera,  1482.  
  39. Sandro  BoQcelli,  Primavera,  1482.   Mercury   Three  Graces  

    Venus   Mercury  +  Venus  =  Cupid   Flora   Zephyrus   Chloris  
  40. Sandro  BoQcelli,  Primavera,  1482.  

  41. Sandro  BoQcelli,  Primavera,  1482.  

  42. Sandro  BoQcelli,  Primavera,  1482.  

  43. The  Medici  Crest  Contained  at  least  four   oranges  

    Sandro  BoQcelli,  Primavera,  1482.  
  44. Fra  Giracomo  Savonarola  

  45. CriAcal  Thinking  QuesAons   1.  Who  were  the  Medicis?  

     What  role  did  they  play   in  the  development  of  15th  century  Italian  art?   2.  What  are  some  key  similariAes  and  differences   between  the  Northern  and  Italian  Renaissances.   3.  What  is  the  significance  to  the  use  of  classical   themes  in  the  context  of  15th  century  Italy.   4.  How  are  classical  modes  of  depicAon  present  in   non-­‐classical  subjects?