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ONOS Summit: Open Source Governance models

ONOS Project
December 12, 2014

ONOS Summit: Open Source Governance models

ONOS Summit: Open Source Governance models
Presented by: Mark Radcliffe, DLAPiper
https://www.dlapiper.com/en/us/people/r/radcliffe-mark-f/

ONOS Project

December 12, 2014
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  1. Mark Radcliffe, Partner, DLA Piper, Silicon Valley OSS Project Governance

    Open Networking Laboratory *This presentation is offered for informational purposes only, and the content should not be construed as legal advice on any matter.
  2. Global platform 2 §  Largest law firm in the world

    with 4,200 lawyers in 31 countries and 77 offices throughout the Americas, Asia Pacific, Europe and the Middle East §  More than 145 DLA Piper lawyers in IP transactions §  Global Open Source Practice §  More than 550 DLA Piper lawyers ranked as leaders in their fields
  3. OSS Practice §  Worldwide OSS practice group §  US Practice

    led by two partners: Mark Radcliffe & Victoria Lee §  Experience § Open sourcing Solaris operating system § FOSS foundations: §  OpenStack Foundation §  PrPL Foundation §  Pivotal Foundation §  OpenSocial §  Open Source Initiative § GPLv3 Drafting Committee Chair § Drafting Project Harmony agreements 3
  4. “Software is eating the world” Marc Andreessen - 2012 4

  5. The OSS Universe is Ever Expanding 2,300+ licenses 4B+ files/1,000,000

    + unique projects >7,500+ sites 10+ Million staff years 5
  6. OSS critical to commercial companies §  IBM announces $1B support

    for Linux §  Intel/Google investment in SkySQL to develop MariaDB §  Netflix § OSS Cloud Prize § Open Sourcing Infrastructure Software: Chaos Monkey §  Cloud Foundry § VMware spins out Cloud Foundry and other software to Pivotal § GE invests $105M in Pivotal §  New collaborative projects § Open Daylight § Allseen Alliance 6
  7. Open source adoption is rising 7 2007 2012 2018 5%

    30% XX% ??? Source: IDC Survey of G2000 Source: Black Duck audit results
  8. Financial Services Mobile Aerospace Polarsys Healthcare Community and co-opetition 8

    The Foundation The Apache Foundation Infrastructure Automotive
  9. Many companies are Contributing: Linux & Openstack Jon Corbet’s 2013

    Linux Weather Forecast §  800 companies have contributed over time §  Past year- 3200 developers, 370 companies §  80% Kernel developers are paid §  Red Hat, Intel, Linaro, Texas Instruments, IBM, Samsung, Google and many others Monty Taylor, Open Stack •  2000 committers •  360 companies. •  6500 patches in months 9
  10. Understanding your Strategy §  Business goals § Critical §  Insight/ability to

    influence functionality of “approved release” §  Significant financial/dev resources available § Important §  Knowledge of (but not input into) roadmap §  Modest financial/dev resources available § User §  Low engagement §  Occasional dev resources 10
  11. Defining Characteristics of a Community §  Community history §  Developer

    initiated: Apache and Linux §  Corporate initiated: OpenStack/OpenDaylight §  Community culture (corporate vs. hacker) §  Legal culture §  Copyleft: GPL-2.0 / GPL-3.0 §  Permissive: Apache-2.0 §  Funding §  Single corporate sponsor §  Multiple corporate financial backers §  Contributions in kind §  Governance §  Funding §  Branding §  Strategic direction §  Technical direction 11
  12. Membership Levels and Roles §  Funding members § Premium (frequently has

    a board seat) § Variable based on revenue (right to vote for a limited set of Board members) § Fixed (right to vote for a limited set of Board members) §  Community members § Academics § Nonprofits §  Individuals 12
  13. Contribution Policies and IP Commitments §  Critical issue: outbound license

    § Copyleft §  GPL-2.0 §  GPL-3.0 §  Eclipse (EPL-1.0) §  Mozilla (MPL-2.0) § Permissive §  Apache-2.0 §  ISC §  Defining Community §  Enabling Upstream Contributions §  Anticipating Downstream Use Cases 13
  14. Contribution Policies and IP Commitments §  Contribution Processes § Separate Contribution

    Agreement §  Contribution Agreement with IP Assignment (rare) §  Contribution License Agreement § Inbound equals Outbound License § Binding Members to IP Policy for Alliance § Developer Certificate of Origin (DCO) §  Issues § Copyright/patent § Contributor base §  Individual §  Corporate (corporate authority) § Technical requirements §  Tying contribution to contributor §  Automating self-executing process 14
  15. Role of Board of Directors §  Sets direction §  Oversee

    use of funds §  Conferences § Commercial § Community § Foundation §  Branding § Certified or Compliant Implementation § Testing §  Changes or Exceptions to License §  Relationship to Other Projects § Host Combined Implementation § Pointer 15
  16. Developer Community Engagement §  Technical Organization § Preservation of open meritocracy

    § Enforces broad participation §  Technical Steering Committee §  Project Leads §  Maintainers §  Committers §  Contributors § Manages release process §  Alternative management proposals for technical community § Technical Steering Committee elected by developers § Technical committee/leads appointed by Board of Directors § Technical leads appointed by Executive Director 16
  17. Intersection of board and Developer Community §  Alternative management proposals

    for technical community § Technical Steering Committee elected by developers § Technical committee/leads appointed by Board of Directors § Technical leads appointed by Executive Director §  Oversight versus control over decision making 17
  18. Summary §  Understand your strategy §  Understand the resources that

    you can commit §  Community origin and history is critical §  Culture is very important §  Input into functionality of approved release §  Role of technical community vs. financial supporters 18