GoogleSky

534b787c49e2b4a9a49fd7c5cf404f1a?s=47 Alberto Conti
October 28, 2011

 GoogleSky

Presented at the Cosmo Club meeting of the Philosophy Society of Washington

534b787c49e2b4a9a49fd7c5cf404f1a?s=128

Alberto Conti

October 28, 2011
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  1. GoogleSky Alberto Conti Space Telescope Science Institute

  2. None
  3. Established in 1997 as NASA’s Optical and Ultraviolet Data Archive

    Supports Active missions: HST, GALEX, Kepler,... Legacy missions: IUE, FUSE, EUVE,... Optical & UV Data Archive
  4. The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) High Energy Astrophysics Science

    Archive Research Center (HEASARC) Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) & IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) Archive Centers Publications X-ray and Gamma Ray Infrared
  5. World-wide technical and scientific leadership in archive system design Secure

    storage and reliable retrieval services for data from HST and all MAST-supported missions User-friendly and scientifically useful search and cross-correlation tools Development and support for inter-archive communication and data transfer standards MAST
  6. None
  7. Challenges for the Future Space is big! For one picture

    you need a 2 Trillion pixels camera! Monochrome : 4 Terabytes or 6% of the Library of Congress Color: 100 Terabytes or the 40% more than the entire Library of Congress Time: 10 Petabytes or 150 times the entire Library of Congress New analysis & visualization tools are required
  8. Massive amounts of information Computer Science Biology Economics Medicine Government

    Astronomy
  9. CREDIT: M. TWOMBLY/SCIENCE; SOURCE: SCIENCE ONLINE SURVEY

  10. Astronomy is changing Growth over 25 years is a factor

    of 30 in glass, 3000 in pixels Detectors follow Moore’s Law Total data doubles every year
  11. 0 50 100 150 200 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

    2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Gbytes/Day Year Archive Use Ingest Rate: 15 TB/yr Retrieval Rate: 85 TB/yr Distributed Volume ~ 6X Ingest SM3B ACS, NCS ACS Failure SM4 WF3, COS, ACS, STIS
  12. Astronomy is special! No commercial value Ideal testbed for complex

    algorithms Interesting problems Plenty of data, plenty of dimensions!
  13. Adapt or Perish Google Earth, Microsoft Virtual Earth have revolutionized

    the way we look at our planet. We proposed a new synergistic approach to the challenge of bringing the universe to our desktops: GoogleSky
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  18. August 22nd, 2007

  19. 0 Light Distance Earth

  20. Satellites Earth

  21. 1.3 Light Seconds Moon

  22. 8.3 Light Minutes Mars

  23. 44.5 Light Minutes Jupiter

  24. 83.5 Light Minutes Saturn

  25. 2.7 Light Hours Uranus

  26. 4.0 Light Hours Neptune

  27. 4.2 Light Hours Pluto

  28. Voyager 1 16.5 Light Hours

  29. 4.2 Light Years Proxima Centauri

  30. 440 Light Years Pleiades

  31. 690 Light Years Helix Nebula

  32. 1.5 thousand Light Years Orion Nebula

  33. 1.5 thousand Light Years Orion Nebula

  34. 2 thousand Light Years Ring Nebula M57

  35. 6.5 thousand Light Years Eagle Nebula M16

  36. 7.5 thousand Light Years Eta Carinae

  37. 20 thousand Light Years V838 Monocerotis

  38. 25 thousand Light Years Center of Our Galaxy

  39. 160 thousand Light Years NGC 1850 in the LMC

  40. 170 thousand Light Years Supernova Remnant

  41. 2.5 million Light Years Andromeda Galaxy

  42. 11 million Light Years Centaurus A

  43. 28 million Light Years Sombrero M104

  44. 37 million Light Years Whirlpool Galaxy NGC 5194

  45. 50 million Light Years M87 NGC 4486

  46. 63 million Light Years Antennae Galaxies

  47. 300 million Light Years The Mice

  48. 420 million Light Years The Tadpole

  49. Gravitational Lenses Mass bends Space

  50. 2.2 billion Light Years Abell 1689

  51. Galaxies in Time

  52. 13 billion Light Years Hubble Ultra Deep Field

  53. www.albertoconti.com @albertoconti

  54. Dr Alberto Conti alberto.conti@gmail.com Dr Carol Christian carolc@stsci.edu Collaborator With

    thanks to Josh Perlow Tony Rogers Chris Hanley Ken Anderson Brian McLean