UX London 2017: Leading Service Design workshop with Kate Tarling

196a4242eecbd120dcb4cd9a80899e34?s=47 Ben Holliday
July 07, 2017

UX London 2017: Leading Service Design workshop with Kate Tarling

196a4242eecbd120dcb4cd9a80899e34?s=128

Ben Holliday

July 07, 2017
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Transcript

  1. 2.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Hello! Kate Tarling

    Home Office (immigration, passports, borders) Ben Holliday Department for Work and Pensions (DWP)
  2. 3.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London What we’re going

    to talk about Service design? Starting with users Framing the problem Orienting around services Setting long term goals and vision for services Communicating service design Getting senior level buy in
  3. 11.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London This is the

    real challenge: An organisation that delivers services, organising itself around the needs of its users
  4. 12.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Always look at

    outputs before job titles http://bit.ly/ux-and-service-design
  5. 13.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London …understanding user needs

    as part of the full end to end service experienced by an end-user. This means working across multiple channels, not excluding administrative or ‘back end’ systems and processes
  6. 14.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London What service designers

    do Design services Choreograph work across teams Stop bad projects, shape good ones Facilitate shared understanding Help others make good decisions
  7. 16.
  8. 17.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Hmm, but what

    about... Internal systems and applications? Internal services like data analytics? Being arrested - surely that’s not a service?
  9. 20.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London They want to

    do something where an organisation has a goal, intent, or something of value to offer
  10. 21.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London The best service

    is one where no one has to do anything
  11. 22.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Verbs not nouns

    Good Get something Check something Stay somewhere Bad e-form digital portal quote builder
  12. 23.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Lets people check

    what their State Pension could be worth when they reach retirement age so that they can plan for their retirement
  13. 24.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Lets people get

    a new passport so that they can travel to other countries and in and out of the UK
  14. 25.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Most services provided

    by large organisations were made before the internet even existed
  15. 28.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Making things digital

    Employing the culture, mindset, practices, processes, skills and technologies of the internet era
  16. 30.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London So what does

    good look like for services made in the internet era?
  17. 31.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Westpac Get a

    new credit card 5 days 5 minutes Example via Sense & Respond by Jeff Gothelf & Josh Seiden
  18. 33.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Problem solved in

    7 days Example via Sense & Respond by Jeff Gothelf & Josh Seiden
  19. 34.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Amazon The process

    becomes the proxy for the result you want. You stop looking at outcomes and just make sure you’re doing the process right. Jeff Bezoz in annual letter to shareholders (2017)
  20. 35.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London What we can

    learn Have a useful and usable vision Ambition to re-think fundamentally Focus on outcomes & learn what works Make it faster to change in future
  21. 37.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Handling challenges like:

    “They don’t have to like it. They just have to do it”
  22. 39.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London What people need

    to do at a fundamental level is less likely to change than organisation design, technology, policy or process. It’s more future proof.
  23. 40.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London The difference between

    what we want people to do and what they actually do is where services become inefficient. Failure demand: avoidable contact, time spent on incomplete or unlikely things, fixing problems, manual processing, guiding people through complexity, hours wasted, opportunity cost.
  24. 41.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Users Citizens Customers

    Front line staff Back office users Service providers Friends and family of users Stakeholders Policy SMEs Other service teams
  25. 42.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London We distinguish between:

    • the end user trying to do something • people delivering a service • what it’s like to use an internal system • what actually needs to happen
  26. 43.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London And we talk

    about: • user needs • the intent of policy, law or regulation • the goals of an organisation • desired outcomes
  27. 44.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Use the wrong

    words and you focus on the wrong problems at the wrong level
  28. 46.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Functional need The

    practical things people need to do Emotional need Feeling stressed or anxious, needing peace of mind or to feel confident about something
  29. 47.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Finding a job

    is practical, the fear of getting sick and losing your job is emotional
  30. 48.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London User needs are

    about understanding the problem space not the solution space
  31. 49.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Research to understand

    real life stages and context, not user needs that IT projects create
  32. 50.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Adapted from @naintaraland

    and sketch by @ayeshamoarif Research here... doesn’t help us to understand this
  33. 51.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Life stages and

    context (planned and unplanned events) eg. retiring, or bereavement Things people have to do eg. check or get their State Pension
  34. 52.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Help people prepare

    for retirement vs Get your State Pension
  35. 53.
  36. 54.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London It’s easy to

    conflate needs with design decisions. These are things we make people do, not what people need: - prove your address - verify who you are - apply for a credit card
  37. 55.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London The test of

    a good user need: If you showed it to a user, would they recognise it as their need? Is it written with words real users use? Does it describe the problem rather than a solution? Will it stay the same regardless of changes to technology, policy, and existing services? Does it help you organise and prioritise work? By @leisa
  38. 56.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Good needs Bad

    needs Need to know if I can or can’t go to the UK Need to know exactly what I can and can’t do while here, so I’m not thrown out of the country Need to complete an application and send documentary evidence of my eligibility Need to read latest guidance on policy changes
  39. 58.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London We should be

    able to trace anything we do to a clear user need, policy or organisational objective. We must be able to measure progress when working towards these goals.
  40. 59.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Framing the problem

    1. Why are we doing this work? 2. Who are our users? 3. What outcome will users get from this service? 4. What outcome are we looking for? 5. What are our key metrics? http://bit.ly/frame-the-problem
  41. 60.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London 1. Why are

    we doing this work? What is our motivation for building this product or service?
  42. 61.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London 2. Who are

    our users? Who do we think would need to use this product or service?
  43. 62.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London 3. What outcome

    will users get from this service? What problem will it solve for people?
  44. 63.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London 4. What outcome

    are we looking for? What problem will it solve for our organisation?
  45. 64.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London The problem in

    both hands User Get something done Faster decision Not waste time Faster payment Clear content and signposting Public sector Reduced costs Increased automation Increased effectiveness Increased efficiency Reduce error and support required
  46. 65.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Simpler, clearer, and

    faster services so good people prefer to use them
  47. 66.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London 5. What are

    our key metrics? What do we need to measure against these outcomes?
  48. 67.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Find the right

    level of focus for a team to organise their work around the needs of users, understanding constraints and key measures
  49. 68.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London ‘We need a

    digital form so that applicants can self serve more’
  50. 69.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London ‘We need a

    digital form so that applicants can self serve more’ Who is ‘we’? What are users really trying to do? Why this? How else? Why now? Or else? What does this data tell us? What does this allow us to do? How would this be different? See more at http://bit.ly/2mRZkj8
  51. 70.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Decide solution Question

    everything ‘We need a mobile app’ ‘Why do people even need to study…’
  52. 71.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Decide solution Question

    everything ‘We need a mobile app’ ‘Why do people even need to learn…’ Agree outcomes Know... Decide... Record… Take action… Feel confident… Do the right thing...
  53. 73.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London How we introduce

    end to end service design in large organisations that understand and structure work in different ways eg IT portfolios, technology programmes, projects, enterprise architecture
  54. 74.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Write or rewrite

    all project descriptions using simple and clear language, so that everyone understands what it is doing and where money is going
  55. 75.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Un-pick solutions Check

    suitability Check eligibility Check identity Make a decision ‘Case work system’
  56. 76.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Describing a service

    • start with a verb • describe the activity the service lets the user do and reflect the policy intent • be made of words the people using the service use • be the only way the service is referred to http://bit.ly/helping-teams-define-their-focus
  57. 77.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London ‘Electronic aviation reporting

    transformation project’ Fly a small aeroplane to the UK Check if someone is allowed to land
  58. 78.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Frame the work

    in terms of the end to end service, to help you see where there is cohesion, and to align teams
  59. 79.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Common types of

    services Start Stop Check or share Register/provide info Get or apply Claim Move Become Learn
  60. 80.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Having a way

    to understand services helps align different groups by using the same language for all the different parts
  61. 81.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Get or apply

    for something e.g. passport, driving licence, permission to study in the UK
  62. 83.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London A service Sub-services

    Activities Capabilities Technology Data What someone is trying to do e.g. work in the UK Key stages e.g. applying The things that need to happen e.g. finding out how or verifying something The ability or capacity to do these things Systems and tools that support this service The actual data e.g. name, address
  63. 84.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Finding out Routing

    & action Make a decision Meeting rules Enforcing rules
  64. 85.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Patterns and standards

    help us scale better service design across a large organisation
  65. 89.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Identify desired service

    outcomes to help guide all the work across a large service
  66. 90.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Theme 1: Finding

    out Theme 2: Routing & action Theme 3: Make a decision Theme 4: Meeting rules Theme 5: Enforcing rules
  67. 91.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Theme 1: Finding

    out about something Outcome People know the right thing to do and what to do next. Or they know they don’t have to do anything. Measure - Comprehension - Likelihood of doing the right thing - Proportion of people who need help
  68. 92.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Theme 3: Make

    a decision Outcome Organisation has the data it needs to make a decision to grant something Measure - Ratio of positive to negative decisions - Ratio of those refused who are subsequently accepted - Time someone is waiting from start to end
  69. 93.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London What people are

    trying to do usually doesn’t neatly align with one team or one organisation, it cuts across them. It changes how we need to work together.
  70. 94.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London ‘Get permission to

    do something’ service overall service owner Finding out sub service owner Routing & action sub service owner Make a decision sub service owner Meeting the rules sub service owner
  71. 96.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London A mission statement

    is an ideal future state or vision for the service that we’re working to deliver. It describes what we’re trying to achieve
  72. 97.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London The challenge is

    to imagine something that asks the right questions
  73. 98.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Emotional: Is there

    a compelling emotional component? Tangible: Is there a clear enough picture to work towards? Open: Is this vision of the future adaptable to change?
  74. 99.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Good example (Co-op

    Funeral Service): Give time back to Funeral Directors to spend with clients digital.blogs.coop/helping-funeralcare-rethink-how-we-deliver-our-at-need-funeral-service/
  75. 100.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Good example (government):

    A way for people to share medical information with government that’s instant, transparent and trusted
  76. 101.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Good example (government):

    Same day decisions for permission for people applying to do something
  77. 102.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Good example (local

    authority): Give time back to carers travelling to visit people in their homes
  78. 103.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Bad example: A

    fully digitised customer experience by 2020
  79. 104.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Bad example: Customers

    fully self serve which cuts support costs
  80. 105.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Bad example: More

    intelligent and smarter use of data across the end to end service
  81. 106.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Bad example: Leverage

    cutting edge technology like blockchain, AI and VR to deliver modern services
  82. 107.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London A good mission

    statement should: • be a single sentence • start with a verb • focus on a real problem people have • not refer to a solution • be possible to measure • be big enough to aim for • be adaptable to change
  83. 111.
  84. 112.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Picture of whole

    service* Reality. Spot gaps and opportunities to align *Don’t start here
  85. 113.
  86. 115.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London When might each

    part happen But work to reduce dependencies between teams
  87. 116.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Roadmap of problems

    to solve Not solutions to be delivered
  88. 117.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Test and learn

    about riskiest assumptions, not ‘minimal viable products (MVPs)’
  89. 118.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London What is our

    riskiest assumption? How can we test it?
  90. 119.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Prototypes for how

    might we check if someone can do something? eg. drive, work, care for children List of prototypes Create a check code Send link in an email Show digital proof Request proof from someone
  91. 120.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Prototype (fake) the

    end to end service, not just the digital interface part of it
  92. 121.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London Summary of things

    we typically use: Scenarios User journeys Picture of a whole service Choreographing the work of other teams Prototype parts of a service or patterns Prototype the whole service (fake it)
  93. 123.

    Kate Tarling and Ben Holliday UX London 1. Get top

    cover support 2. JFDI: Make good examples and publicise 3. BE the top cover support 4. Reality distortion 5. How to win friends and influence people 6. Allies and alliances 7. Embed with decision makers and budget holders 8. Be willing to see this change over 2 - 5 years 9. Keep going