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Solving an Impossible First/Last Mile Problem: Mountain View's North Bayshore by Jeffrey Tumlin

Solving an Impossible First/Last Mile Problem: Mountain View's North Bayshore by Jeffrey Tumlin

Presentation by Jeffrey Tumlin, Nelson\Nygaard Consulting Associates, to Moving on Mobility: Last Mile Transportation Solutions
at Stanford University on May 2, 2016. Organized by the Bill Lane Center for the American West, Stanford Public Policy , the Precourt Institute for Energy and Joint Venture Silicon Valley.

Transcript

  1. Solving an Impossible First/Last Mile Problem: Mountain View’s North Bayshore

    Jeffrey Tumlin @jeffreytumlin
  2. Mountain View

  3. 1.  Require real TDM 2.  Parking is your primary traffic

    management tool 3.  Stop using FAR and density control as traffic management proxy. 4.  Create business case for TDM. 5.  Manage streets for person throughput 6.  Design streets for walking and biking
  4. Mode Share Targets Goal:  Achieve  the  mode  share  targets  established

      in  the  Shoreline  Transporta8on  Study   ¤ Create  a  comprehensive  bicycle  network   ¤ Make  walking  pleasant  and  convenient   ¤ Provide  a  range  of  transporta8on  op8ons   ¤ Establish  a  strong  TMA  and  implement  TDM  programs  
  5. TDM Approach 1) Require all employers or property owners seeking

    development entitlements to: –  Implement a TDM program designed to achieve a 45% SOV mode share –  Join the TMA –  Establish a property/employer specific vehicle trip cap based on a 45% SOV mode share –  Monitor and report annually vehicle trips generated to ensure they are below their trip cap 2) Institute a district wide vehicle trip cap: –  Based on the vehicle capacity of the 3 entry points to North Bayshore during the peak period –  Monitor vehicle trips at entry points biannually to determine when vehicle trips may be nearing the cap 3) Implement congestion pricing if goal not met
  6. Complete Street Network

  7. North Bayshore Precise Plan • Regulate building character: – Height, setback, stepback

    – Materials and design – Form Based Code • Manage traffic directly: – Cap vehicle trips – Require TDM – Limit parking • Monetize Trip Reduction • Design for pedestrians and transit first • Change performance metrics and analysis guidelines
  8. Parking Approach • No minimums • 2.7 spaces per 1,000 maximum for

    office/R&D • No reserved parking • Specific requirements for carshare, carpool, and clean vehicles • Parking supply must match trip reduction commitment
  9. Residential Infill • No minimums for residential • Required unbundling • Debate about

    maximums Future Proofing: • Retrofitable: Floor-to-ceiling, level floors, removable ramps • No requirement for parking areas to accommodate humans
  10. Residential Mews 10

  11. Mixed Residential Street 11

  12. Residential Street 12

  13. Mixed Street 13

  14. Shoreline Corridor Plan • Focus on Shoreline Blvd. – Across U.S. 101

    to North Bayshore – Along Shoreline Blvd. and Stierlin Rd. – Downtown and Transit Center • Support Precise Plan mode shift targets • Connections to larger bike/ ped/transit network
  15. Summary of Recommended Improvements •  US Route 101 Crossing – Median,

    reversible transit lane – New pedestrian/bike bridge – Narrower travel lanes – Realigned on-ramps – Bike lane enhancements •  Shoreline Boulevard – Median, reversible transit lane – 1-way protected bike lanes – Protected intersections – Enhanced pedestrian space
  16. Summary of Recommended Improvements •  Stierlin Road – Class II bike

    lanes – Traffic calming •  Central / Moffett / Castro – Reconfigure Castro St. – Additional crossing time – High-visibility crosswalks – Bicycle crossing provisions •  Transit Center – Shuttle loading and operational improvements
  17. Pedestrian/Bike Bridge Flickr - Riex www.cyclelicio.us/

  18. Protected Bike Lane Rosemead Blvd. - Temple City, CA Joe

    Linton/Streetsblog LA Joe Linton/Streetsblog LA
  19. Shoreline at Pear Avenue A

  20. Transit Center (Short-Term)

  21. Transit Center (Long-Term) • Substantial increase in rail service (Caltrain, light

    rail, and High Speed Rail) over next 7 to 15 years • Transit riders already exceed planned Transit Center capacity and expected to more than double •  More capacity is needed for bikes and transit shuttles •  Grade-separated crossing would benefit vehicles, transit riders, bikes, and pedestrians •  Recommendation: Develop master plan for Transit Center in cooperation with VTA and Caltrain
  22. 1.  Require real TDM 2.  Parking is your primary traffic

    management tool 3.  Stop using FAR and density control as traffic management proxy. 4.  Create business case for TDM. 5.  Manage streets for person throughput 6.  Design streets for walking and biking
  23. For More Information Jeffrey Tumlin Mobility Accessibility Sustainability 116 New

    Montgomery St, Ste 500 San Francisco, CA 94103 USA Tel: +1 415-284-1544 jtumlin@nelsonnygaard.com www.nelsonnygaard.com
  24. None