Scholarly communication and Zotero

Scholarly communication and Zotero

For the iSchool Bootcamp, August 2020

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Dorothea Salo

August 05, 2020
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Transcript

  1. Scholarly communication, and wrangling it with Zotero iSchool Bootcamp Dorothea

    Salo
  2. Photo: Stiller Beobachter, “tombstone,” https://www.flickr.com/photos/a-herzog/ 24747507548/ CC-BY

  3. Photo: mine, reuse it if you want!

  4. Corollary: you will not learn everything you ever need to

    know here! Not everything you will need to know is presently known! And things change!
  5. Corollary to the corollary: while you’re here you need to

    learn how to “keep current” and “remember useful stuff.”
  6. Corollary to the corollary to the corollary: your own head

    is not big enough to contain all the useful stuff you’ll need to remember.
  7. So start picking out some memory-aid tools now! Zotero is

    one! There are others! (Pinboard 4 lyfe!)
  8. pinboard.in/u:dsalo

  9. pinboard.in/u:dsalo

  10. pinboard.in/u:dsalo/t:601

  11. Citation: what it’s for • Courtesy to those who came

    before you • We all stand on the shoulders of giants! • Convenience for those who come after you! • Credit (especially relevant in workplace assessment) • I’m academic staff, not faculty, so I am not assessed on how often my publications are cited. (I am assessed on whether I produce publications!) • iSchool faculty are assessed on this in tenure and promotion processes. (Not all by itself, of course! But still.) So is the iSchool as a whole. • If you end up working in a tenure environment, future academic librarians or full-time iSchool instructors/faculty… you could be too! • Conversation, like @-ing somebody on social media. “Hi, I’m quoting/commenting on this thing you wrote.”
  12. Citation styles • if you’re thinking “ugh, can’t I just

    link?” I’m with you… but no. • In scholarly and professional writing, citation is a highly rule-driven activity. • Irritatingly, there are lots of different sets of rules citation styles! • When my current research group (datadoubles.org) discusses where we want to publish our results, “what’s that journal’s citation style?” is actually one of the questions we ask! • Don’t try to cite by hand. You will hate yourself. And us! And scholarly communication! • Use Zotero. USE ZOTERO. USE ZOTERO!!!!!
  13. Step 1: Have Zotero open • You can’t use the

    in-browser Zotero Connector button to save stuff to Zotero unless Zotero is running. • You also can’t put citations in a document unless Zotero is running. • So when you’re working on an iSchool assignment involving citations, get in the habit of starting Zotero first! • Honestly… I have it in my Mac’s “Login Items” preferences, so it starts up whenever I reboot. • I am a GIANT NERD, however. You don’t absolutely have to do this.
  14. Step 2: Click the button! (yes, I have a lot

    of stuff in my browser toolbar)
  15. Step 2a: Decide on a folder • I have per-project

    folders and a catchall folder in my Zotero. • You… don’t necessarily need to do this. • I don’t love how Zotero moves/copies citations — I commonly end up with a lot of duplicated ones, some of which are slightly wrong. • So if you want to leave all your citations in one giant pile, I won’t argue! This can work fine! • If you do, though, select the correct folder before you start using Zotero Connector.
  16. Step 3: Check Zotero’s work • Sometimes it’s beautiful. Sometimes

    it’s wretched. • (This isn’t Zotero’s fault — it’s a question of how nicely the website plays with Zotero, really.) • ALWAYS check news stories and blog/social media posts you put into Zotero. • Books and journal articles usually work better. Not always, but usually. • Zotero calls a lot of things a “Web Page” that are actually reports, news stories, journal articles… • It matters because citation styles treat these differently! • Always fix this mistake when you see it! • Check capitalization in titles. This is style-dependent! Some styles want Title Case For Everything. Others don’t.
  17. Yes!

  18. Here’s a news story…

  19. … which Zotero mangled. nope! news story! sorry, what?! oof,

    need this date!
  20. Better! ISO 8601! YYYY-MM-DD the one true and honest date

    format! use it always!
  21. Yay, citations! Now what? • Now you actually put them

    in what you’re writing. • YOU NEED TO KNOW WHICH CITATION STYLE YOU’RE USING FIRST. • LIS is a hybrid discipline! We have humanists, social scientists, and “hard” scientists. This means we use a lot of different citation styles! I’m sorry! • If you ever have me as an instructor: I DON’T CARE, pick your favorite. But other iSchool instructors care a lot, so if we don’t specify, ASK. • (In my publishing life, I’ve mostly had to use APA, but Chicago and MLA have also come up. I mostly publish social-science-y stuff, a little humanities.)
  22. In Word…

  23. Click “Document Preferences.”

  24. In Google Docs…

  25. Adding a citation • (sorry, screenshotting this is really annoying

    to do) • Put your cursor where you want the footnote/endnote callout or in-text citation. • This, too, varies by citation style! • From the Zotero menu, pick “Add/Edit Citation.” • You will (… eventually; this can be slow) get a red-bordered search box. Search in it for what you want to cite. • Title, author, whatever — Zotero looks in everything it’s got. • Zotero should show you a list of possible citations. • Select the one you want. Wait for Zotero to insert it. Done!
  26. … wait, I did get a screenshot!

  27. Questions?