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Humans are terrible compilers: A User's Guide

Humans are terrible compilers: A User's Guide

Humans are well known for their ability to be adaptable, flexible, and improvise as needed. However, they are often used as very oddly behaved compilers of written documents - run books for services, legal agreements, and pull requests / code reviews are a few examples.

This talk covered several known issues with the current release of the Human 1.0 compiler, practical workarounds for these issues than anyone can use, and ways to debug when everything goes wrong.

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Eric Sigler

October 31, 2016
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Transcript

  1. @esigler Eric Sigler, Head of DevOps, PagerDuty Humans are terrible

    compilers: A User’s Guide
  2. @esigler

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  6. @esigler Runbooks

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  9. Your compiler has bugs. @esigler

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  13. Workarounds for confirmaAon bias @esigler

  14. “Illusion of validity” @esigler

  15. Workarounds for “Illusion of validity” @esigler

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  17. @esigler Workarounds for overconfidence bias

  18. @esigler

  19. @esigler Theory Of Mind

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  22. @esigler Frameworks, yo.

  23. @esigler Nonviolent Communication

  24. @esigler Observations
 Feelings
 Needs
 Requests

  25. @esigler We’re all a little too awesome at pattern matching


    Be aware that you have bias
 Consider when to use Theory of Mind and when not to
 Communication tooling is crucial
  26. @esigler Wikipedia: List of Cognitive Biases Theory of Mind Nonviolent

    Communication Books: Thinking, Fast and Slow
  27. @esigler “Since learning about confirmation bias, I keep seeing it

    everywhere!” Buster Benson (@buster)
  28. @esigler Thank you! Questions?