Setting Fire to Silos: How to Bridge the Divide Between Development and Design

Setting Fire to Silos: How to Bridge the Divide Between Development and Design

The divide between design and development can be vast. Designers lob something over the wall for development without knowledge or perspective of technical limitations, and developers are left to sort out requirements and edge cases. No one is satisfied when designers' visions aren't implemented or developers are expected to explain why something can't be built. It doesn't have to be this way. This talk will introduce solutions you can implement on your team to bridge the divide and do your best work. We'll cover why upfront planning, identifying the problem before agreeing on a solution, and cross-disciplinary collaboration are crucial to successful projects.

This version of the talk was presented at Jazz Con in New Orleans, March 2018.

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Glynnis Ritchie

March 22, 2018
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Transcript

  1. How to Bridge the Divide Between Development and Design Setting

    Fire to Silos @glynnisritchie
  2. Glynnis Ritchie Creative Director, Designer Clio + Calliope @glynnisritchie

  3. How to Bridge the Divide Between Development and Design Setting

    Fire to Silos @glynnisritchie @glynnisritchie
  4. @glynnisritchie

  5. @glynnisritchie

  6. Our current implementation of the phone system needs to be

    significantly improved through integration with our multiple customer relationship management systems. We also need improved search capabilities so that people answering the phones can more quickly assist customers. @glynnisritchie “
  7. Our current implementation of the phone system needs to be

    significantly improved through integration with our multiple customer relationship management systems. We also need improved search capabilities so that people answering the phones can more quickly assist customers. @glynnisritchie “
  8. Building Search (It’s easy, right?) @glynnisritchie

  9. Zero to production in 4 months. @glynnisritchie

  10. But what’s the secret? Yeah, yeah. That’s cool and all.

    @glynnisritchie
  11. Let’s Talk about Silos @glynnisritchie

  12. @glynnisritchie

  13. @glynnisritchie

  14. @glynnisritchie

  15. @glynnisritchie

  16. @glynnisritchie

  17. When designers don't see their designs implemented the way they

    envisioned and developers must explain why it can’t be built, no one is happy. @glynnisritchie
  18. No one enjoys working this way. @glynnisritchie

  19. None
  20. None
  21. None
  22. Without requirements or design, programming is the art of adding

    bugs to an empty text file. –Louis Srygley @glynnisritchie “
  23. @glynnisritchie @glynnisritchie

  24. BRIDGING THE DIVIDE @glynnisritchie Polish those soft skills!

  25. Life outside the silo is scary. @glynnisritchie

  26. Yes, and… @glynnisritchie “

  27. Establish a safe space. @glynnisritchie

  28. unicorn @glynnisritchie

  29. Interdisciplinarity: the combining of two or more disciplines into one

    activity; creating something new by crossing boundaries as new needs emerge. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interdisciplinarity @glynnisritchie
  30. I have experienced first-hand what happens to a project when

    there is a front-end dev with a strong design sensibility and when there is one without it. In terms of the final design, the difference is as stark as night and day. Agile UX in the Enterprise, UX Pin @glynnisritchie “
  31. Interdisciplinary skills and team members are key.

  32. Don’t be afraid to ask the obvious questions.

  33. Repeat things back to your team mates.

  34. DEFINE the problem @glynnisritchie before you argue about the solution.

  35. Our current implementation of the phone system needs to be

    significantly improved through integration with our multiple customer relationship management systems. We also need improved search capabilities so that people answering the phones can more quickly assist customers. @glynnisritchie “
  36. Our current implementation of the phone system needs to be

    significantly improved through integration with our multiple customer relationship management systems. We also need improved search capabilities so that people answering the phones can more quickly assist customers. @glynnisritchie “
  37. collaboration FIRST @glynnisritchie Don’t let hand offs be the only

    time you talk to each other.
  38. @glynnisritchie

  39. @glynnisritchie

  40. None
  41. Share meetings. @glynnisritchie

  42. @glynnisritchie wocintechchat.com

  43. @glynnisritchie DESIGN DEVELOPMENT PLANNING 1 month 3 months 2 weeks

    Unsuccessful Project Timeline: Design as a Band-aid
  44. @glynnisritchie FIXING DESIGN/UX ISSUES DEVELOPMENT DESIGN 2 months 3 months

    2 months…??? Unsuccessful Project Timeline: Silos & Rework
  45. @glynnisritchie Too little collaboration means information lost, and designs lack

    direction. Too much ‘heads-down time’ and the designers find themselves siloed from the rest of the process, handing off their work rather than building something better together. https://www.invisionapp.com/blog/tuning-design-process/ –Mel DeStefano “
  46. @glynnisritchie ITERATIVE DEVELOPMENT & DESIGN COLLABORATIVE VISION 2 weeks 3

    months Successful Project Timeline: Agile Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration DESIGN DEV DESIGN DEV DESIGN DEV
  47. @glynnisritchie DESIGN DEVELOPMENT estimates of effort technical feasibility performance considerations

    high-level vision user flows visual check of requirements
  48. @glynnisritchie DESIGN DEVELOPMENT user testing to validate revisions for scope

    review implementation of design recommended alternatives review of feasibility
  49. @glynnisritchie http://www.gv.com/sprint/ “The sprint gives you a superpower: You can

    fast- forward into the future to see your finished product and customer reactions, before making any expensive commitments.”
  50. @glynnisritchie ITERATIVE DEVELOPMENT & DESIGN COLLABORATIVE VISION via KICK-OFF SPRINT

    DESIGN DEV DESIGN DEV DESIGN DEV The whole team! Successful Project Timeline: Agile Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration
  51. @glynnisritchie wocintechchat.com

  52. DESIGN FOR THE IDEAL STATE @glynnisritchie then scale back to

    define iterative releases.
  53. None
  54. The team and your company’s perception of them benefit from

    a common, visible goal. @glynnisritchie
  55. @glynnisritchie

  56. What does that actuallY look like? @glynnisritchie

  57. Start with research. @glynnisritchie

  58. User research concerns the whole team, not just designers. @glynnisritchie

  59. Help developers help the user. @glynnisritchie

  60. If everyone starts with the same information, they can make

    better decisions on behalf of the team. @glynnisritchie
  61. Developers should vet designs early and be involved in design

    review. @glynnisritchie
  62. @glynnisritchie

  63. Do you have all the information you need to implement

    this today? @glynnisritchie
  64. Vetting technical feasibility helps identify problems sooner. @glynnisritchie

  65. @glynnisritchie

  66. @glynnisritchie

  67. Designers should be involved in pull request review. @glynnisritchie

  68. @glynnisritchie

  69. Screen share, pair, or walk through something together in person.

    @glynnisritchie
  70. @glynnisritchie ITERATIVE DEVELOPMENT & DESIGN COLLABORATIVE VISION via KICK-OFF SPRINT

    DESIGN DEV DESIGN DEV DESIGN DEV The whole team! Successful Project Timeline: Agile Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration Design at least one sprint ahead so there’s time for feedback before development on a feature begins.
  71. @glynnisritchie SPRINT 1 Ideal Agile Workflow Design task defined &

    prioritized 2 week sprint begins Designer collaborates with dev to determine appropriate deliverable and technical feasibility Designer consults with project manager as necessary if priority may be affected Designer completes deliverable by end of sprint SPRINT 2 Requirements and design reviewed by dev for clarity 2 week sprint begins Developer builds feature based on design deliverable Dev demos with designer for accuracy and/or designer engages in PR review Designer approves PR and feature moves to QA
  72. Once all parties have reviewed and approved, only then is

    the PR merged. @glynnisritchie
  73. @glynnisritchie SPRINT 1 Ideal Agile Workflow with User Testing Design

    task defined & prioritized 2 week sprint begins Designer collaborates with dev to determine appropriate deliverable and technical feasibility Designer consults with project manager as necessary if priority may be affected Designer completes deliverable by end of sprint SPRINT 3 Requirements and design reviewed by dev for clarity 2 week sprint begins Developer builds feature based on design deliverable Dev demos with designer for accuracy and/or designer engages in PR review Designer approves PR and feature moves to QA SPRINT 1 SPRINT 2 Tightly scoped user testing to verify assumptions and answer design questions before development begins. Designs revised as necessary. Sometimes questions still exist at this stage and need research or user testing to confirm assumptions.
  74. We all need somebody to lean on @glynnisritchie

  75. Developers would much rather leave design decisions to designers. They

    may not even know when they’re making a design decision. @glynnisritchie
  76. Developers can’t involve you as a designer if you aren’t

    there. @glynnisritchie
  77. Designers should review the implementation of their work before it

    gets merged. @glynnisritchie
  78. As a product manager, being involved in design and development

    can help you keep your team focused. @glynnisritchie
  79. You can’t accomplish any of this (especially shipping an ambitious

    project quickly) if you aren’t in the room. @glynnisritchie
  80. @glynnisritchie clioandcalliope.com • @glynnisritchie