Photoshop Basics

Photoshop Basics

In June 2016 I taught a class for New Orleans Video Access Center in Baton Rouge and New Orleans, LA, to film makers who wanted to learn professional skills. Following an introduction to design principles, the class completed an exercise using some of the basic tools and workflows in Photoshop, before going on to create and design their own original movie poster design.

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Glynnis Ritchie

June 24, 2016
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Transcript

  1. June 25-26, 2016, 9AM-3PM Photoshop Basics Glynnis Ritchie Designer, Web

    Developer New Orleans
  2. Introductions

  3. Syllabus & Schedule

  4. An introduction to design principles and how to apply them.

    Design 101
  5. Alignment

  6. Alignment creates order. Aligning elements allows them to create a

    visual connection with each other, and makes it easier for the eye to know where to look next.
  7. http://www.thinkingwithtype.com/contents/grid/

  8. http://www.thinkingwithtype.com/contents/grid/

  9. http://www.thinkingwithtype.com/contents/grid/

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  12. http://www.thinkingwithtype.com/contents/grid/

  13. http://www.thinkingwithtype.com/contents/grid/

  14. Hierarchy

  15. “A typographic hierarchy expresses the organization of content, emphasizing some

    elements and subordinating others. A visual hierarchy helps readers scan a text, knowing where to enter and exit and how to pick and choose among its offerings.” –Ellen Lupton, Thinking With Type
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  18. http://www.thinkingwithtype.com/contents/text/#Line_Spacing/

  19. http://www.thinkingwithtype.com/contents/text/#Line_Spacing/

  20. Contrast

  21. Contrast can help direct attention, call out differences in meaning

    or information, or make a design more interesting.
  22. http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/5-basic-principles-graphic-design-take-granted-everyday/

  23. http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/5-basic-principles-graphic-design-take-granted-everyday/

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  25. “Combining typefaces is like making a salad. Start with a

    small number of elements representing different colors, tastes, and textures. Strive for contrast rather than harmony, looking for emphatic differences rather than mushy transitions. Give each ingredient a role to play: sweet tomatoes, crunchy cucumbers, and the pungent shock of an occasional anchovy.” –Ellen Lupton, Thinking With Type
  26. http://www.thinkingwithtype.com/contents/letter/#Mixing_Typefaces

  27. http://creativepro.com/dot-font-seven-principles-of-typographic-contrast/

  28. http://www.thedieline.com/blog/2015/12/29/qfat4hhynqitxyroo84h9l9jk1o8xo

  29. Repetition

  30. The principle of repetition simply means the reusing of the

    same or similar elements throughout your design. Repetition of elements in a design will bring a clear sense of unity, consistency, and cohesiveness. https://visscom.wordpress.com/2013/04/16/principle-of-repetition-pattern/
  31. http://maddisondesigns.com/2009/03/the-5-basic-principles-of-design/

  32. M. C. Escher Goose Tessellation

  33. Andy Warhol’s Marilyns

  34. http://www.edgee.net/the-principles-of-graphic-design-how-to-use-repetition-effectively/

  35. http://www.edgee.net/the-principles-of-graphic-design-how-to-use-repetition-effectively/

  36. Proximity

  37. Objects or shapes that are close to one another appear

    to form groups. Even if the shapes, sizes, and objects are radically different, they will appear as a group if they are close together. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principles_of_grouping
  38. The law of proximity states that humans perceive stimuli that

    are close to each other by grouping them and recognizing them as part of the same object. Meanwhile, stimuli that stand far from one another are parts of two or more different objects. https://visscom.wordpress.com/2013/04/16/principle-of-repetition-pattern/ –Gestalt Principle of Proximity
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  42. Putting it all together

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  49. Looking at Movie Posters Applying design principles, content and metaphor,

    and breaking things down.
  50. Movie Posters: Design Principles

  51. Saul Bass

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  58. Joel Amat Güell

  59. Movie Posters: Content & Metaphor

  60. A movie poster (like its opening credits) can tell you

    something about a film’s content.
  61. What does a movie poster design reveal about the film’s

    overall themes?
  62. • Memorable scenes • Overall theme • Plot clues •

    Celebrities
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  76. Fan Poster: Joel Amat Güell

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  81. Exercise: Fake Movie Poster

  82. Looking at Movie Posters Part II: Breaking Things Down

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  108. http://jeffvictor.blogspot.com/2015/06/jurassic-world-movie-poster-redesign.html

  109. Joel Amat Güell

  110. Design prep for your masterpiece File management, brainstorming, gathering inspiration

    and assets, sketching, and finding tutorials.
  111. File Management & Image Resolution

  112. • Raster images (don’t scale well) • Good for photo

    composites, including photographic elements • Harder to recycle work in the future because it doesn’t scale infinitely Common file outputs: .psd, .jpg, .png
  113. • Vector images (infinite scaling of mathematical points) • Great

    for illustration • Easy to recycle or resize work in the future because it scales infinitely Common file outputs: .ai, .svg, .pdf, .eps
  114. • Type-centric, perfect for multi-page documents • Easy to deal

    with “masters” or repeating elements and change lots of styles at once • Great for print projects with lots of text Common file outputs: .indd, .pdf
  115. • Keep your drafts/revisions as separate files. • Making a

    duplicate or doing “Save As” every few hours to make a new file may be helpful in case you want to go back to an earlier version. Photoshop only preserves so much history. • Keep all assets or images you’re incorporating into your design. • Keep original design files (i.e. the “.psd”, not just the output “.jpg”). You may want to modify it or create a new version for another design like a postcard or DVD cover.
  116. • Create a folder structure that helps you find old

    things (I start file names with dates) • Don’t be afraid to recycle work or elements • Be aware of software versions or file types depending on who you’re sharing with
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  119. PPI, or pixels per inch, is a measure of the

    sharpness on a display screen. When printing, instead of pixels there are dots of color, or DPI, dots per inch. Both PPI and DPI can also be referred to as the resolution of an image.
  120. 72-150ppi is a common image resolution for the web, but

    300ppi or higher is needed for printed work to look sharp.
  121. Example Process

  122. 1. Understand requirements, size, budget, materials, etc. 2. Look at

    similar work, find inspiration 3. Decide what’s been overdone (exercise taste) 4. Gather inspiration in one place (Pinterest or mood board) 5. Artfully steal (colors, themes, typeface combos, materials) 6. Sketch ideas, thumbnails, make notes 7. Refine sketches and ideas 8. Photograph sketches or find assets 9. Create original work 10. Print prototype for approval/proofing
  123. Good questions to ask yourself or others: • What info

    needs to be included? • What info is the most important? • Can I cut anything? • What mood do I want to set? • Color? Black and white? • Format/deliverable? • How much time to work on this? (build in time for revisions) • What other formats of this work might be needed?
  124. Inspiration

  125. Ouija invites: overdone

  126. Artful Stealing: Theirs

  127. Featuring Michael Cunningham, Michael Lewis, Dave Eggers, George Saunders &

    more Artful Stealing: Mine
  128. Artful Stealing: Theirs

  129. Artful Stealing: Mine

  130. A spirited evening of cocktails & ghost stories benefitting Big

    Class’s free writing programs for New Orleans youth ages 6-18. Big Class is a nonprofit organization dedicated to cultivating and supporting the voices of New Orleans’ writers ages 6-18 through creative collaborations with schools and communities. Learn more at bigclass.org. 532 Louisa St., New Orleans, LA 70117 504.308.1423 Jeremy Blum Mary Carlton Alvin David Jayeesha Dutta Natalie Girard Sarah Grainer José Guadarrama Kelly Harris-Deberry Nicole Hershey Jez Luckett Nora McConnell-Johnson Kurston Melton Heather Muntzer Sam Randolph Glynnis Ritchie Josie Scanlan Emma Schain Cherie Teamer Kathleen Whalen Emily Wilkerson Hosts & Ghostwriters Hosted by Wayne Amedee and Julie & Ted George Special thanks to our media sponsor The New Orleans Advocate and a A spirited evening of cocktails & ghost stories benefitting Big Class’s free writing programs for New Orleans youth ages 6-18. Big Class is a nonprofit organization dedicated to cultivating and supporting the voices of New Orleans’ writers ages 6-18 through creative collaborations with schools and communities. Learn more at bigclass.org. 532 Louisa St., New Orleans, LA 70117 504.308.1423 Jeremy Blum Mary Carlton Alvin David Jayeesha Dutta Natalie Girard Sarah Grainer José Guadarrama Kelly Harris-DeBerry Nicole Hershey Jez Luckett Nora McConnell-Johnson Kurston Melton Heather Muntzer Sam Randolph Glynnis Ritchie Josie Scanlan Emma Schain Cherie Teamer Kathleen Whalen Emily Wilkerson Hosts & Ghostwriters Hosted by Wayne Amedee and Julie & Ted George Special thanks to our media sponsor The New Orleans Advocate and a Revisions
  131. Preparing to Design Your Poster

  132. Explore theme, metaphor, and plot. What can you communicate about

    your film to draw people in?
  133. Make a list of major ideas, themes, and think about

    how you might represent them visually.
  134. For Gattaca: • Dystopia, drained colors • Genetics, double helix

    • The sea • Concealed identity • Cheating the system • Rocket ships • Space • Hope/dreams (clouds?) • Science, equations • Exceeding expectations • Imposter syndrome • Stolen identity • Purity/perfection vs. imperfection • Natural vs. designed • Climbing the social ladder, ascent • Education and social status • Class system based on genetics • Lack of opportunity • Predetermination • Controlled society
  135. Sketch some rough thumbnails to experiment quickly and explore big

    ideas about composition, and test alternative approaches.
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  137. What are some effects or layers that you think you

    will need based on your design? Begin browsing tutorials for techniques you want to learn or include.
  138. Fan Poster: Joel Amat Güell

  139. Collect assets or source images for your design. Look for

    large images that all have the same PPI—300ppi or higher.
  140. Adjust PPI using Image > Image Size… Change the resolution

    number. Remember: you can’t add information where it doesn’t already exist.
  141. Resources

  142. skillshare.com Video Tutorials and Classes Referral link: http://skl.sh/1S0kyTQ colourlovers.com Color

    palettes
  143. skillshare.com Video Tutorials and Classes Referral link: http://skl.sh/1S0kyTQ color.adobe.com Color

    picker and palettes
  144. creativemarket.com Pre-fab design assets

  145. skillshare.com Video Tutorials and Classes Referral link: http://skl.sh/1S0kyTQ

  146. lynda.com Video Tutorials and Classes

  147. youtube.com Video Tutorials

  148. dribbble.com Searchable design inspiration

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