Decentralization & Blockchain: Possibilities & Problematizations for Libraries

Decentralization & Blockchain: Possibilities & Problematizations for Libraries

GLORIANA ST. CLAIR DISTINGUISHED LECTURE IN 21ST CENTURY LIBRARIANSHIP - Carnegie Mellon University - Qatar

The hype cycle for the technology known as Blockchain has reached a fever pitch, but it remains misunderstood by many. What is blockchain? What value could it bring to information management and library services? And, why should information professionals be interested? Jason Griffey will discuss the potentials and pitfalls of blockchain, focusing on its ability to decentralize and upend a number of assumptions about the way digital goods and services are implemented. He will also look at the problems of blockchain technologies; give some guidelines on separating hype from reality; and talk through what libraries should be watching for – and helping to build – over the next several years.

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Jason Griffey

March 21, 2018
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Transcript

  1. Decentralization & Blockchain Possibilities & Problematizations for Libraries Jason Griffey

    Affiliate Fellow Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society Harvard University Gloriana St. Clair Distinguished Lecture in 21st Century Librarianship
  2. Bitcoin Photo by btckeychain - http://flic.kr/p/pRNcBV

  3. None
  4. Blockchain

  5. None
  6. None
  7. None
  8. None
  9. Decentralization

  10. ledger Date - Time - Identity - Transaction Details

  11. Block 44

  12. Block 43 Block 44

  13. Block 43 Block 44 Hash

  14. Block 43 Block 44 Hash Block 45

  15. Block 43 Block 44 Hash Block 45 Hash

  16. Block 43 Block 44 Hash Block 45 Hash

  17. Public Verifiability Integrity Transparency Decentralized Robust Resistance To Manipulation Many

    Authors Block 43 Block 44 Hash Block 45 Hash
  18. Consensus Algorithms

  19. Incentives

  20. Proof of Work

  21. Proof of Stake

  22. Proof of Authority

  23. Proof of Weight

  24. Byzantine Fault Tolerance

  25. Directed Acyclic Graph

  26. ledger Date - Time - Identity - Transaction Details

  27. ledger Database Date Time Identity Transaction

  28. None
  29. Photo by btckeychain - http://flic.kr/p/NT6bxT

  30. smart

  31. None
  32. None
  33. Plantoid

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  43. BaaS

  44. None
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  47. Possibilities Photo by marsupium photography - http://flic.kr/p/kmLrrp

  48. Provenance Metadata that reflects the chain of ownership/possession of a

    physical object.
  49. Digital Provenance

  50. Bibliographic Metadata Decentralized OCLC

  51. Book
 Metadata

  52. Book
 Metadata Book
 Metadata

  53. Book
 Metadata Book
 Metadata Metadata
 Update

  54. Book
 Metadata Book
 Metadata Metadata
 Update Book
 Metadata

  55. Book
 Metadata Book
 Metadata Metadata
 Update Book
 Metadata M

  56. First Sale

  57. Digital First Sale

  58. Distributed Verifiable Credentialing

  59. Expanded University

  60. Distributed Verifiable Sovereign Identity

  61. Universal Library Card

  62. Problems

  63. Centralization

  64. None
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  69. Conclusion Photo by benjaflynn - http://flic.kr/p/FAJjc7

  70. https://ischoolblogs.sjsu.edu/blockchains/

  71. https://eprint.iacr.org/2017/375.pdf http://doyouneedablockchain.com/

  72. –Roy Amara “We tend to overestimate the effect of a

    technology in the short run and underestimate the effect in the long run.” Amara’s Law
  73. –Roy Amara “We tend to overestimate the effect of a

    technology in the short run and underestimate the effect in the long run.” Amara’s Law
  74. “We have just started to make a technological society. The

    technological changes in the next 20 years will dwarf those of the last 20 years. It will almost be like nothing at all has happened yet.” — Kevin Kelly
  75. Douglas Adams said...

  76. Douglas Adams said... 1. Anything that is in the world

    when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works.
  77. Douglas Adams said... 1. Anything that is in the world

    when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works. 2. Anything that’s invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty-five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it.
  78. Douglas Adams said... 1. Anything that is in the world

    when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works. 2. Anything that’s invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty-five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it. 3. Anything invented after you’re thirty- five is against the natural order of things.
  79. Remove the Centers Democratize the Decisions Reduce the Friction

  80. P H O TO C R E D I T:

    C I N D I B LY B E R G M E A S U R E T H E F U T U R E H T T P : / / M E A S U R E T H E F U T U R E . N E T A F F I L I AT E F E L L O W B E R K M A N K L E I N C E N T E R F O R I N T E R N E T & S O C I E T Y H A RVA R D U N I V E R S I T Y J G R I F F E Y @ C Y B E R . H A RVA R D . E D U H T T P : / / J A S O N G R I F F E Y. N E T T H E L I B R A RY B O X P R O J E C T H T T P : / / L I B R A RY B O X . U S J A S O N G R I F F E Y F O U N D E R / P R I N C I PA L C O N S U LTA N T E V E N LY D I S T R I B U T E D L L C H T T P : / / E V E N LY D I S T R I B U T E D . N E T