Keeping your content alive from cradle to grave

5d79f73bf83f3675bbc6dbbcb3b1ba81?s=47 Donna Spencer
October 14, 2010

Keeping your content alive from cradle to grave

By now we all know that the web is not a publication — that it’s a living, evolving thing. But a lot of content I see still appears to be ‘published’ once and then left alone.

This talk is about what happens after content is published. We’ll talk about how to:

- decide what to create in the first place (and what the best format is)
- identify which content types need to be left alone, and which need to be looked after
- revive existing content and give it a second wind
- check your content is still working for its readers
- put it to sleep when it is time
- put a process in place so you can do this yourself and with distributed content creators

We’ll also discuss how this varies depending on your industry, size of site and type of content.

5d79f73bf83f3675bbc6dbbcb3b1ba81?s=128

Donna Spencer

October 14, 2010
Tweet

Transcript

  1. Keeping your content alive: From cradle to grave

  2. About me • User experience freelancer – information architecture, interaction

    design, content strategy  Far too long (10+ years) • Run UX Australia (Sydney, late August 2011) • @maadonna Card sorting How to write great copy for the web A practical guide to information architecture
  3. What still happens

  4. Content strategy “Content strategy plans for the creation, publication and

    governance of useful, usable content” Kristina Halvorson – The discipline of content strategy http://www.alistapart.com/articles/thedisciplineofcontentstrategy/ “It plots an achievable roadmap for individuals and organizations to create and maintain content that audiences will actually care about.” Kristina Halvorson – Content strategy for the web (New Riders)
  5. Does it matter? • Why isn’t it OK to write

    a site, launch and leave it?
  6. The world changes

  7. People’s expectations change

  8. None
  9. None
  10. None
  11. Your content changes • Rules, policies, procedures, principles, ideas –

    they all just change
  12. What we’re going to talk about • Deciding what to

    publish in the first place • Identifying content types that can be left alone and which need to be looked after • Reviving existing content • Checking the content is still working • Retiring content when it is time • Processes for distributed content authors
  13. What we’re not going to talk about • Not e‐commerce/product

    sites • Not user‐generated content sites • Relates to content‐heavy sites • Not just words. All content – words, audio, video, diagrams etc
  14. What to publish • How do you figure out what

    to publish? • My list  Stuff you know that people need to know  Upcoming issues and topics  Cyclical content  Feedback from people  Questions from people  Things you learn from actual user research  Search terms
  15. Identifying content to leave alone/manage One‐off Needs checking and updating

    Grows over time
  16. Identifying content to leave alone/manage One‐off Needs checking and updating

    Grows over time • News • Articles • Summaries of something that happened (event) • Instructions • Processes, guidelines & policies • Data (graphs etc) • Conference talks (e.g. UX Australia) • Event details
  17. None
  18. Reviving • Why restart when you can re‐use

  19. None
  20. None
  21. None
  22. None
  23. None
  24. None
  25. None
  26. Reviving • Why restart when you can re‐use • Rotate

    articles to home page • Restart a discussion • Related and interesting articles
  27. Is your content still working? • Walk through key scenarios

    as if you were new to it
  28. None
  29. None
  30. None
  31. None
  32. None
  33. None
  34. None
  35. None
  36. Is your content still working? • Walk through key scenarios

    as if you were new to it • Pay attention to feedback and questions  “How much does the conference cost?”  “Do workshops cost extra?”  “How do I pay you?”  “What time does the conference finish?” • Use remote tools to see what’s happening on your site
  37. None
  38. None
  39. None
  40. None
  41. http://www.flickr.com/photos/24139340@N02/4931570875/

  42. Is your content still working? • Walk through key scenarios

    as if you were new to it • Pay attention to feedback and questions  “How much does the conference cost?”  “Do workshops cost extra?”  “How do I pay you?”  “What time does the conference finish?” • Use remote tools to see what’s happening on your site • Undertake usability testing
  43. None
  44. Retiring content • What do you do when content is

    ready to retire?
  45. None
  46. None
  47. None
  48. None
  49. None
  50. None
  51. None
  52. None
  53. Retiring content • What do you do when content is

    ready to retire? • My list  Delete it (& redirect links)  Mark it as out of date  Wrap it up into past tense (UX Australia)  Archive it
  54. And distributed authorship… • Run content like a project •

    Set milestones/deadlines/tasks • If you’ve identified what you need & what its lifecycle is, this is easy
  55. Wrap up • Look after content for its entire lifecycle

    by:  Deciding what to publish in the first place  Identifying content types that can be left alone and which need to be looked after  Reviving existing content  Checking the content is still working  Retiring content when it is time  Putting in place processes for distributed content authors
  56. Questions & thanks • http://maadmob.com.au/ • +61 409‐778‐693 • donna@maadmob.net

    • Twitter etc: maadonna