LEETS Keynote - Good for Whom?

LEETS Keynote - Good for Whom?

As libraries evolve, technological solutions for many of the problems librarians face on a daily basis become more and more enticing. While many of the technological wonders do make our work lives better, they often affect our members in ways that are not well understood. How do we find solutions to our problems that are good for everyone? This is not a new question. Libraries can learn from how others have balanced the effects technologies have on people throughout times of great change.

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Matthew Reidsma

August 01, 2013
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Transcript

  1. GOOD FOR WHOM? MATTHEW REIDSMA GRAND VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY

  2. These wonderfully intricate things we build have become part of

    people’s lives, things they use every day. “ Trent Walton “Tongue-Tied,” The Manual, Vol. 2, 2011. p.70
  3. http://sitorsquat.com

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  13. “ Indifference towards people and the reality in which they

    live is the one and only cardinal sin in design. Dieter Rams
  14. https://twitter.com/#!/ebellempire/status/172355190232592384

  15. “ Kendra Shimmell People may think that design is about

    screens, objects, or logos, but it’s actually about people. https://twitter.com/MrAlanCooper/status/263730888678993921
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  20. http://iwataasks.nintendo.com/interviews/#/wii/nsmb/0/3 It’s designed so that whatever you do, you’ll get

    the mushroom. “ Shigeru Miyamoto
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  23. In an email to me, March 21, 2013. So how

    do you fix this if your tool is, indeed, just a label-maker? “ William Keillor, Bethel University
  24. GET HERE? HOW DID WE

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  26. Design for the person at the next bench. “ Hewle

    -Packard
  27. Welcome to OPAC Catalog of Your Local Library You may

    search for: A > AUTHOR T > TITLE J > JOURNAL B > AUTHOR/TITLE SEARCH S > SUBJECT W > KeyWORD C > LC CALL NO P > Repeat PREVIOUS Search R > RESERVE Lists I > Library INFORMATION O > OTHER Libraries F > Campus/Faculty Information database V > VIEW your circulation record D > DISCONNECT Choose one (A,T,J,B,S,W,C,P,R,I,O,F,V,D)
  28. WE HOW DO DO THIS?

  29. THEY HOW DO DO THIS?

  30. WE HOW DO DO THIS?

  31. MY LIBRARY

  32. SIGN MY LIBRARY

  33. SIGN AESTHETICS MY LIBRARY

  34. CARD CATALOG & CIRCULATION SIGN AESTHETICS

  35. CARD CATALOG & CIRCULATION RESOURCES RESOURCES RESOURCES SIGN AESTHETICS

  36. CARD CATALOG & CIRCULATION RESOURCES RESOURCES RESOURCES SIGN WAYFINDING AESTHETICS

  37. REFERENCE DESK CARD CATALOG & CIRCULATION RESOURCES RESOURCES RESOURCES SIGN

    WAYFINDING AESTHETICS
  38. REFERENCE DESK CARD CATALOG & CIRCULATION EXHIBIT EXHIBIT NEW BOOK

    DISPLAY BULLETIN BOARD: EVENTS, NEWS, ETC. RESOURCES RESOURCES RESOURCES SIGN WAYFINDING AESTHETICS
  39. REFERENCE DESK CARD CATALOG & CIRCULATION EXHIBIT EXHIBIT NEW BOOK

    DISPLAY BULLETIN BOARD: EVENTS, NEWS, ETC. RESOURCES RESOURCES RESOURCES SIGN HOURS MAPS HELP WAYFINDING AESTHETICS
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  41. WE HOW DO DO THIS?

  42. THEY HOW DO DO THIS?

  43. TENSION THERE IS A HERE

  44. MAGICAL ESCALATOR OF AQUIRED KNOWLEDGE http://www.uie.com/articles/magic_escalator/

  45. MAGICAL ESCALATOR OF AQUIRED KNOWLEDGE http://www.uie.com/articles/magic_escalator/ NO KNOWLEDGE

  46. MAGICAL ESCALATOR OF AQUIRED KNOWLEDGE http://www.uie.com/articles/magic_escalator/ NO KNOWLEDGE ALL KNOWLEDGE

  47. MAGICAL ESCALATOR OF AQUIRED KNOWLEDGE http://www.uie.com/articles/magic_escalator/

  48. MAGICAL ESCALATOR OF AQUIRED KNOWLEDGE http://www.uie.com/articles/magic_escalator/ CURRENT KNOWLEDGE

  49. MAGICAL ESCALATOR OF AQUIRED KNOWLEDGE http://www.uie.com/articles/magic_escalator/ CURRENT KNOWLEDGE TARGET KNOWLEDGE

  50. MAGICAL ESCALATOR OF AQUIRED KNOWLEDGE http://www.uie.com/articles/magic_escalator/ CURRENT KNOWLEDGE TARGET KNOWLEDGE

    } KNOWLEDGE GAP
  51. CURRENT KNOWLEDGE MAGICAL ESCALATOR OF AQUIRED KNOWLEDGE http://www.uie.com/articles/magic_escalator/ TARGET KNOWLEDGE

  52. CURRENT KNOWLEDGE MAGICAL ESCALATOR OF AQUIRED KNOWLEDGE http://www.uie.com/articles/magic_escalator/ TRAIN IN

    G
  53. MAGICAL ESCALATOR OF AQUIRED KNOWLEDGE http://www.uie.com/articles/magic_escalator/ CURRENT KNOWLEDGE TARGET KNOWLEDGE

  54. MAGICAL ESCALATOR OF AQUIRED KNOWLEDGE http://www.uie.com/articles/magic_escalator/ CURRENT KNOWLEDGE SIM PLIFYIN

    G
  55. http://www.uie.com/articles/magic_escalator/ TRAIN IN G

  56. WE HOW DO DO THIS?

  57. http://www.uie.com/articles/magic_escalator/ SIM PLIFYIN G

  58. THEY HOW DO DO THIS?

  59. The Inmates are Running the Asylum There is li le

    difference technically between a complicated, confusing program and a simple, fun, and powerful product. “ Alan Cooper
  60. The Inmates are Running the Asylum The difference is one

    of culture, training, and a tude of the people who make them. “ Alan Cooper
  61. CHOOSE HOW WE OUR TOOLS

  62. FUNCTIONAL 1 WHAT CAN THIS DO FOR US? Powers, William.

    Hamlet’s Blackberry: Building a Good Life in the Digital Age. New York: Harper Perennial, 2010. p.160.
  63. WHAT TO DO

  64. BEHAVIORAL 2 HOW DO BEHAVIORS CHANGE? Powers, William. Hamlet’s Blackberry:

    Building a Good Life in the Digital Age. New York: Harper Perennial, 2010. p.160.
  65. HOW TO DO IT

  66. 2 1 INTERNAL QUESTIONS

  67. WE HOW DO DO THIS?

  68. “ The library world has been far too gullible, far

    too willing to regard any technical advance as a service advance. Jonathan D. Lauer & Steve McKinzie Lauer, J. & McKinzie, S. (2002/2003). Bad moon rising: a candid examination of digital reference and what it means to the profession. The Reference Librarian, 79/80, 46..
  69. Your members don’t come to the library to find books,

    or magazines, journals, films or musical recordings. “ Hugh Rundle http://hughrundle.net/2012/04/04/libraries-as-software-dematerialising-platforms-and-returning-to-first-principles/
  70. They come to hide from reality or understand its true

    nature. They come to find solace or excitement, companionship or solitude. “ Hugh Rundle http://hughrundle.net/2012/04/04/libraries-as-software-dematerialising-platforms-and-returning-to-first-principles/
  71. HUMAN 3 HOW DOES THIS AFFECT HUMAN EXPERIENCE? Powers, William.

    Hamlet’s Blackberry: Building a Good Life in the Digital Age. New York: Harper Perennial, 2010. p.160.
  72. FEEL HOW DO PEOPLE

  73. The Timeless Way of Building, p. 65 The life of

    a house, or of a town, is not given to it, directly, by the shape of its buildings, or by the ornament and plan— “ Christopher Alexander
  74. The Timeless Way of Building, p. 65 it is given

    to them by the quality of the events and situa ons we encounter there. “ Christopher Alexander
  75. Aarron Walter, Designing for Emotion THEM

  76. Aarron Walter, Designing for Emotion THEM

  77. Designing for Emotion Designing an interface to be usable is

    like a chef crea ng edible food. “ Aarron Walter
  78. 3 EXTERNAL QUESTION

  79. THEY HOW DO DO THIS?

  80. http://whitneyhess.com/blog/2012/02/27/don-draper-is-the-antithesis-of-user-experience/ User experience isn’t about expert intui on, it’s about

    expert listening. “ Whitney Hess
  81. FUNCTIONAL 1

  82. FUNCTIONAL 1 BEHAVIORAL 2

  83. FUNCTIONAL 1 BEHAVIORAL 2 HUMAN 3

  84. FORWARD A WAY (OR, DITCH THE LABEL MAKER)

  85. USERS PRIORITIZE YES! OVER PROCESSES

  86. People will forget what you said, and what you did,

    “ Maya Angelou
  87. but they will never forget how you made them feel.

    “ Maya Angelou
  88. HUMAN 1 FUNCTIONAL 2 BEHAVIORAL 3

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  90. http://usablelibrary.com

  91. http://usablelibrary.com

  92. http://nytimes.com/2013/06/09/opinion/sunday/how-not-to-be-alone.html?_r=o Technology celebrates connectedness, but encourages retreat. “ Jonathan Safran

    Foer
  93. http://nytimes.com/2013/06/09/opinion/sunday/how-not-to-be-alone.html?_r=o Each step “forward” has made it easier, just a

    li le, to avoid the emo onal work of being present, to convey informa on rather than humanity. “ Jonathan Safran Foer
  94. I-IT Martin Buber. I and Thou. trans. Gregor Smith. Edinburgh:

    Clark, 1937
  95. I-THOU Martin Buber. I and Thou. trans. Gregor Smith. Edinburgh:

    Clark, 1937
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  97. “The Space Between You and Me,” The Manual, Issue #1,

    2012. The web is not an interlinking of servers and scripts. Each node is a person. “ Frank Chimero
  98. Designing for Emotion “ Aarron Walter We [should] stop thinking

    of the interfaces we design as dumb control panels, and think of them as the people our target audience wants to interact with.
  99. PEOPLE YOUR LIBRARY IS

  100. Junod, Tom. “Can You Say...Hero?” Esquire. November, 1998. We make

    so many connec ons here on earth. Look at us—I’ve just met you, but I’m inves ng in who you are, and who you will be, and I can’t help it. “ Fred Rogers
  101. THANKYOU

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  104. weaveux.org