Sunday Morning Keynote (Karen Brennan)

Sunday Morning Keynote (Karen Brennan)

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PyCon Canada

August 13, 2013
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Transcript

  1. Computational Creativity: 
 What Kids Learn as 
 Designers of

    
 Interactive Media Karen Brennan Harvard University PyCon Canada 2013
  2. What do people do
 with computers?

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  6. consumers,
 not creators

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  8. Everyday life is increasingly regulated by complex technologies that most

    people neither understand nor believe they can do much to influence. Bandura, 2001
  9. code

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  12. We cannot afford to ignore code or allow it to

    remain the exclusive concern of computer programmers and engineers. Hayles, 2005
  13. Programming is the sweet spot, the high leverage point in

    a digital society. If we don’t learn to program, we risk being programmed ourselves. Rushkoff, 2010
  14. The 4th R … provides an alternative to fact-based mastery

    and proposes, instead, iterative, process-oriented, constructive, innovative thinking. Davidson, 2012
  15. not just for some kids

  16. ALL kids

  17. Everyone should learn how to read and write our computational

    world.
  18. But how can we support kids’ participation as computational creators?

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  26. Female 37% Male 63%

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  28. What are kids
 learning?

  29. Learning concepts
 Learning practices
 Learning perspectives

  30. Learning concepts

  31. sequences, loops, parallelism, events, functions, variables, conditionals, etc.

  32. Low Floor High Ceiling

  33. Low Floor High Ceiling Wide Walls

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  35. 3.3 million projects shared since May 2007!

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  41. They say that teaching is the highest form of learning

    or understanding. I think that making math projects has actually helped me understand math concepts better than learning in school. “ ”! Sonia, 16 years old
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  48. Learning practices

  49. Many children are held back in their learning because they

    have a model of learning in which you have either “got it” or “got it wrong.” But when you learn to program a computer you almost never get it right the first time. The question to ask about the program is not whether it is right or wrong, but if it is fixable. Papert, 1980
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  52. What’s your process
 for fixing your programs?

  53. 1.  Read through your code. 2.  3. Reorganize your code.

    4. Try writing your code again. 5. Tell/ask someone about the problem. 6. Look for examples that work. 7. Take a break.
  54. 1. Read through your code. 2. Experiment with your code.

    4. Try writing your code again. 5. Tell/ask someone about the problem. 6. Look for examples that work. 7. Take a break.
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  56. It’s like Bananagrams – you get so far into the

    program, or into the game, and then you realize, “I’ve got these other letters, how do I get them in?” You have to be able to take apart parts of your project and remix it up and put it back in. Jenson, 11 years old!
  57. 1. Read through your code. 2. Experiment with your code.

    3. Reorganize or rewrite your code. 5. Tell/ask someone about the problem. 6. Look for examples that work. 7. Take a break.
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  60. 1. Read through your code. 2. Experiment with your code.

    3. Reorganize or rewrite your code. 4. Tell/ask someone about the problem. 6. Look for examples that work. 7. Take a break.
  61. projects

  62. comments projects

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  67. 1. Read through your code. 2. Experiment with your code.

    3. Reorganize or rewrite your code. 4. Tell/ask someone about the problem. 5. Look for examples that work. 7. Take a break.
  68. projects remixes

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  72. 1. Read through your code. 2. Experiment with your code.

    3. Reorganize or rewrite your code. 4. Tell/ask someone about the problem. 5. Look for examples that work. 7. Take a break.
  73. 1. Read through your code. 2. Experiment with your code.

    3. Reorganize or rewrite your code. 4. Tell/ask someone about the problem. 5. Look for examples that work. 6. Take a break.
  74. Sometimes, I get myself so dug in a hole that

    I have to just get myself out of Scratch for the day and then start it up another time because after a lot of programming, your head hurts. It’s not easy to program with a hurting head! “ ”! Jenson, 11 years old
  75. Learning perspectives

  76. It is creative apperception more than anything else that makes

    the individual feel that life is worth living. Winnicott, 1971
  77. It’s really great to express yourself creatively. You could do

    anything with Scratch. You can make video games, music, art, anything. The possibilities are endless, no limitations, really. “ ”! Lindsey, 12 years old
  78. I loved the challenge. I was persistent. I had grit.

  79. It gives you that sense of accomplishment when you finally

    finish your project. It boosts your confidence when you finish something that you never thought was possible. “ ”! Bradley, 12 years old
  80. Now I have what I call a ‘programmer’s mind’. That

    is where I think about how anything is programmed. This has gone from toasters, car electrical systems, and soooo much more. “ ”!
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  82. What are kids
 learning?

  83. Learning concepts
 Learning practices
 Learning perspectives

  84. Learning learning

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  87. Scratch lets you explore your imagination. You design your own

    stuff, and once you start, you just don’t want to stop. Because as you learn more, you can see there are more possibilities, and the more possibilities there are, the more you want to expand on what you just learned. “ ”! Bradley, 12 years old
  88. karen_brennan@gse.harvard.edu http://scratch.mit.edu/ http://scratch-ed.org/