Prince County Internet Primer

E2ed169f43b7aae4f46de5fa9ef837e9?s=47 Peter Rukavina
September 25, 2016

Prince County Internet Primer

A presentation to constituents of Robert Morrissey, MP at a Town Hall on Rural Internet Access, September 23, 2016 at St. Louis Community Centre, Prince Edward Island.

E2ed169f43b7aae4f46de5fa9ef837e9?s=128

Peter Rukavina

September 25, 2016
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Transcript

  1. Bandwidth, Usage & Bundles A Prince County Internet Primer A

    Presentation by Peter Rukavina to the Town Hall Meeting on Rural Internet Service St. Louis Community Centre, September 23, 2016
  2. JULY 18, 1993 CRAFTS SUPPLIES INFORMATION AVAILABLE Craftspersons looking for

    information on sources of supplies, materials, or equipment can now send electronic mail to address: info@crafts-council.pe.ca Please put "WANTED:" at the beginning of your subject line. The "PEI Crafts Information Service" is service of the non-profit PEI Crafts Council in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada. We have an ever-growing database of suppliers, covering all of the various crafts media; while we are still in the midst of information gathering and data entry, there is much useful information available now and we will respond to inquires as best we can. The bulk of our suppliers-on-file are located in North America, roughly half in Canada and half in the U.S.A. We can answer questions like "give me a list of the ceramics suppliers east of the Mississippi," "where can I get a rug hooking kit," or "who sells ConeArt kilns?" We can provide address, telephone, fax, WATS number, a list of products sold and, where we have a catalogue on file, more detailed information about specific products. We also track consumer experiences with suppliers when we receive it. Actual contact with suppliers for information and ordering is left to craftspersons themselves; we'll just help find them.
  3. Who am I? reinvented

  4. Who am I?

  5. Who am I?

  6. The Unfulfilled Promise March 26, 1997 For immediate release PEI

    Transformation From Canada's Smallest Province To Canada's Smartest Province Premier Pat Binns today announced a bold initiative designed to catapult Prince Edward Island (PEI) into the forefront of the Information Age, recasting it from Canada's smallest province to the country's smartest province. The project is meant to create a massive increase in technology use in PEI, and revolutionize the way the world views the province. PEI, in cooperation with Island Tel Advanced Solutions, Newbridge Networks and Sun Microsystems of Canada Inc., has begun building one of the most pervasive broadband communications networks in the world. Stretching from one end of PEI to the other, and joined by fibre optics to the mainland, the PEI Broadband Network will offer citizens, students, educators, business and government networked applications at some of the lowest costs available anywhere.
  7. A successful, modern economy and a successful modern education system

    are based on the universal, equitable availability of affordable Internet service.
  8. Bandwidth “How Fast?”

  9. Bandwidth • The size of the “pipe” connecting you to

    the Internet. • Measure in “Megabits per second” – Mbps. • Two numbers – “down” and “up” – tell you bandwidth from Internet to you, and from you to Internet. • Bigger number = more capacity. • Sometimes they only advertise the “down.”
  10. Bandwidth

  11. Bandwidth You can test your bandwidth at sites like SpeedTest.net.

    
 Here’s the result in my Charlottetown office:
  12. My Office – 150/50

  13. My House – 20/2

  14. Usage “How Much?”

  15. Usage • How much flows up and down the “pipe”.

    • Every time you visit a website, watch a Netflix show, upload a YouTube video, sync you phone, data flows up and down the Internet to you. • Some providers “cap” your usage, some don’t, and some “sort of” do.
  16. None
  17. Delivery “How?”

  18. Delivery Wired Wireless

  19. Delivery Wired Wireless Fibre DSL Dial-up Satellite Radio Cable Cell/MiFi/

    LTE/3G/4G
  20. Delivery Wired Wireless Fibre DSL Dial-up Satellite Cell/MiFi/ LTE/3G/4G Radio

    Cable
  21. St. Louis Community Centre 3563 Union Rd, St. Louis

  22. None
  23. None
  24. None
  25. None
  26. Provider Down Up Monthly Install Technology Bell Aliant 7 0.6

    $88.45 $49.95 DSL Eastlink n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Route 2 5 1 $59.55 $99.00 Wireless Xplornet* 10 1 $69.99 $49.00 Satellite St. Louis Community Centre * with 75 GB cap
  27. Provider Down Up Monthly Install Technology Bell Aliant 7 0.6

    $88.45 $49.95 DSL Eastlink n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Route 2 5 1 $59.55 $99.00 Wireless Xplornet* 10 1 $89.99 $49.00 Satellite St. Louis Provider Down Up Monthly Install Technology Bell Aliant 150 50 $105.95 $0 Fibre Eastlink 20 2 $79.95 $0 Cable Charlottetown * with 75 GB cap
  28. In other words… I have 1400% more bandwidth 
 in

    my Charlottetown office 
 than it’s possible to 
 buy in St. Louis for only 
 17% more per month.
  29. Providers “Who?”

  30. AirTech Communications

  31. AirTech Communications • Wireless network from dedicated base stations. •

    Bandwidth of up to 8 Mbps down/5 Mbps up. • $64.95 to $99.95 per month. Wireless
  32. Bell Aliant • Fibre optic (glass) cables run directly to

    the home. • Sometimes called “Fibre to the Home” or “FTTH.” • Very, very high bandwidth (up to 940/100). • Available to “most residents in Summerside, Miscouche, O’Leary and Alberton.” • $88.95 to $149.95 per month. Fibe (Fibre Op)
  33. Bell Aliant • Uses the regular old copper telephone network.

    • Limited by your distance from the switch. • Thus, not available everywhere there are phones. • Maximum 7 Mbps down/0.6 Mbps up. • $88.45 to $98.45 per month. High Speed (DSL)
  34. Bell Aliant • Uses the cell phone network. • Provided

    by Bell Aliant, through arrangement with the Province, only in areas where Fibre nor DSL is available. Known internally as “PEI wireless rural Internet plan.” • “Kneecapped” to have same bandwidth as DSL. • Same $88.45 to $98.45 per month as DSL Mobile/Cell (MiFi)
  35. Eastlink • Uses the cable television network, backed by fibre.

    • Limited to “Summerside, Alberton and Tignish.” • Pricing and bandwidth information not published. Cable
  36. Island Telecom (Route 2)

  37. Island Telecom (Route 2) • Wireless network from own base

    stations. • Bandwidth of 5 Mbps down/1 Mbps up. • Service is location and weather-dependent; trees, especially with water, can interfere. • $59.99 per month. Wireless
  38. Xplornet • Uses a satellite dish. • Limited to 10

    Mbps down/1 Mbps up. • Pricing heavily dependent on usage: $49.99 for 10GB of usage) to $109.00 per month (for 100GB of usage). • Launching a new satellite to support bandwidth of 25 Mbps down/4 Mbps up. Satellite
  39. Xplornet • Planned for the end of 2017. Will use

    a brand new network of 25 towers. • Funded in part by the federal “Connecting Canadians” program. • Similar pricing and bandwidth to satellite offering. • Gaps in service area (Urbainville/Mount Pleasant) and line-of-site required (backup is satellite). LTE
  40. Gotchas “Watch Out!”

  41. “Introductory” Pricing

  42. “Introductory” Pricing

  43. Installation & Activation

  44. Bandwidth Caps Early termination fees apply. Activation fee is $0

    on a 2 year commitment. Monthly service fee includes the rental cost of the Subscriber Module Equipment (Xplornet retains ownership of the equipment). As such, subscriber modules carry a lifetime limited warranty. If for any reason the customer cancels their service the customer is responsible for returning the equipment to Xplornet. If customer installation requirements go beyond the scope of a basic installation, additional fees may apply. Depending on the features of your package, if you exceed your monthly usage allowance, your service will go into a limited state or you may be billed for data used beyond your usage allowance. Once you reach your monthly bandwidth threshold on the limited state plan, you will be slowed down to 150 kbps. For non limited state packages, an additional $2/GB charge applies when exceeding the monthly usage allowance. See participating dealer for details. Taxes apply.
  45. Bundles

  46. None
  47. Email Addresses • Avoid tying your email address to your

    Internet provider – fred@eastlink.ca – because once you do this, it’s really, really difficult to change Internet providers because you can’t take your email address with you. • Use email services from third parties: free ones like Gmail, Yahoo, or paid ones like FastMail.
  48. Bandwidth, Usage & Bundles A Prince County Internet Primer A

    Presentation by Peter Rukavina to the Town Hall Meeting on Rural Internet Service St. Louis Community Centre, September 23, 2016