Upgrade to Pro — share decks privately, control downloads, hide ads and more …

On Multilingual WordPress Sites

On Multilingual WordPress Sites

At WordCamp Europe 2019, the largest WordPress conference to date, I presented my take on multilingual WordPress websites.

To democratise publishing, internationalisation is one of many barriers that WordPress needs to overcome. That’s why, for 2020 and beyond, the goal is to find an official way to build multilingual websites. Until now, this was considered to be plugin territory, but what is needed to make WordPress a true polyglot? In this talk I cover the status quo of multilingual WordPress websites and share ideas — both from a technical and a user’s perspective — on how WordPress could evolve in this area over the next few years.

5253258c79d25b02f51e0ac55e30cf69?s=128

Pascal Birchler

June 22, 2019
Tweet

Transcript

  1. On Multilingual WordPress Sites WordCamp Europe 2019

  2. Pascal Birchler
 @swissspidy

  3. Foreword

  4. Gutenberg Phase 4

  5. 2020 (or later)

  6. Everybody else already is multilingual

  7. WordPress already is multilingual

  8. WordPress Internationalization

  9. Internationalization Version 1.2 (2004)

  10. 100+ Locales

  11. None
  12. User Language

  13. Multilingual Websites? Plugin Territory™

  14. Previous Efforts

  15. None
  16. None
  17. None
  18. Multilingual WordPress in an ideal world

  19. Posts

  20. Terms

  21. Media

  22. Blocks

  23. Permalinks

  24. Performance

  25. Usability

  26. API

  27. Connecting the Dots

  28. Status Quo

  29. None
  30. None
  31. None
  32. None
  33. None
  34. None
  35. None
  36. Custom WordPress Functionality Automatic Manual

  37. Multilingual WordPress realistically

  38. one-size-fits-all

  39. Backward Compatibility

  40. Extensibility

  41. The Next Steps

  42. 2020 (or later)

  43. Multisite?

  44. Get Involved!

  45. make.wordpress.org

  46. Thanks for joining!