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Why the LSST will change astrophysics forever

03e2e7de45b193cac192ae7ea071e5ff?s=47 Arfon Smith
April 30, 2014

Why the LSST will change astrophysics forever

As the flagship next-generation optical survey telescope, LSST promises to be a significant instrument for a range of research domains. In this talk I'll discuss why LSST is uniquely placed to transform the way that researchers collaborate around research software and data.

03e2e7de45b193cac192ae7ea071e5ff?s=128

Arfon Smith

April 30, 2014
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  1. Why the LSST will change astrophysics forever Arfon Smith @arfon

    Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License
  2. Why the LSST will change astrophysics forever Arfon Smith @arfon

    Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License might
  3. Why the LSST will change astrophysics forever Arfon Smith @arfon

    Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License should
  4. Why the LSST will change astrophysics forever Arfon Smith @arfon

    Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License will hopefully
  5. !

  6. What is a GitHub?

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  15. Astrophysics for non- astronomers

  16. http://www.flickr.com/photos/blachswan

  17. http://www.flickr.com/photos/esoastronomy/

  18. http://www.flickr.com/photos/esoastronomy/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/jamiegilbert

  19. http://amandabauer.blogspot.com/

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  22. Diffraction grating Telescope Detector

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  28. 130 130 1 2048 189 189 258 258 480 562

    378 378 493 521 390 397 851 851 247 274 319 319 304 580 493 511 610 636 188 188 228 228 > cat bad_pix_mask.txt
  29. Wasteful 2 days work 3 observing runs/week 52 weeks in

    year 15 year detector lifetime ! 2*3*52*15 = 4680 days (13 years)
  30. Wasteful… but the norm 2 days work 3 observing runs/week

    52 weeks in year 15 year detector lifetime ! 2*3*52*15 = 4680 days (13 years)
  31. How is the Open Source community doing it?

  32. Open source collaborations Open Source vs Open Collaborations

  33. Open source collaborations Open Source: the right to modify, not

    the right to contribute.
  34. Open source collaborations Open Collaborations: a highly collaborative development process

    and are receptive to contributions of code, documentation, discussion, etc from anyone who shows competent interest.
  35. Open source collaborations Open Collaborations: a highly collaborative development process

    and are receptive to contributions of code, documentation, discussion, etc from anyone who shows competent interest. THIS
  36. How is the Open Source community doing it?

  37. Culture of reuse

  38. Low friction collaboration

  39. How do 4000 people work together?

  40. The pull request

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  48. Code first, permission later

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  52. “open source is… reproducible by necessity” Fernando Perez http://blog.fperez.org/2013/11/an-ambitious-experiment-in-data-science.html

  53. Better at collaborating because they have to be

  54. (doesn’t have to mean this) Open Public? =

  55. Open (within your team, department or institution)

  56. Electronic

  57. Available

  58. Asynchronous, exposed process

  59. Lock-free

  60. Low friction collaboration

  61. What’s happening in academia today?

  62. Collaboration around code

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  68. Collaborative authoring

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  71. Collaborative teaching

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  75. What about LSST?

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  77. 10 ? n Level 1 (continual) Level 2 (periodic)

  78. LSST is a project that is inherently open

  79. Supernovae Weak lensing Active Galactic Nuclei Solar System Galaxies Transients/variable

    stars Large-scale structure Stars, Milky Way Strong lensing Informatics and Statistics Dark Energy (DESC)
  80. Where do communities form?

  81. Around a shared challenge?

  82. Around shared data?

  83. Supernovae Weak lensing Active Galactic Nuclei Solar System Galaxies Transients/variable

    stars Large-scale structure Stars, Milky Way Strong lensing Informatics and Statistics Dark Energy (DESC)
  84. Open Source: Culture of reuse is ubiquitous

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  91. Your software should be about the thing that is different

  92. Your software should be about the thing that is different

    science too!
  93. How do we make this behaviour the norm?

  94. Credit

  95. “Academic environments of today do not reward tool builders” Ed

    Lazowska, OSTP event http://lazowska.cs.washington.edu/MS/MS.OSTP.pdf
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  104. “publishing a paper about code is basically just advertising” David

    Donoho http://www.stanford.edu/~vcs/Video.html
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  106. How to derive meaningful metrics from open contributions?

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  110. Reproducibility Data intensive

  111. Trust

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  117. Discoverability

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  119. Barriers are cultural, not technical

  120. What can you do today?

  121. Why are you sharing?

  122. Share more often

  123. If you’re going to share it then you better put

    a licence on it
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  125. Treat documentation as a first class entity

  126. Share more often (no matter how small)

  127. 130 130 1 2048 189 189 258 258 480 562

    378 378 493 521 390 397 851 851 247 274 319 319 304 580 493 511 610 636 188 188 228 228 > cat bad_pix_mask.txt > git clone git@github.com:arfon/aat/pixel_masks
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  129. Open Data is the least we can do

  130. This is not a talk about Open Science

  131. This is a talk about Accelerated Science

  132. Thanks. arfon@github.com @arfon "