How to be an evil scientist workshop

33a8eda64dec30551fd0b474443e4b35?s=47 Armakuni
December 06, 2019

How to be an evil scientist workshop

Have you ever fancied turning your co-workers into laboratory rats and have them scurry around a maze searching for food whilst you ring a bell and the office cat slavers at the mouth?

No? Okay, well we weren't going to tell you how to do that anyway!

What we will share is how to embed a culture of ongoing experimentation that enables your team to learn and adopt new technologies, techniques, and processes - whilst also achieving current objectives.

No animals were harmed in the creation of this workshop.

33a8eda64dec30551fd0b474443e4b35?s=128

Armakuni

December 06, 2019
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Transcript

  1. 1.

    armakuni.com Agile Scotland Edinburgh - December 2019 Zenon Hannick &

    Craig Fotheringham How to be an Evil Scientist
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    Your first name A The Evil N The Crazy B

    The Terrifying O The Iron C The Big P The Poison D The Dangerous Q The Bloody E Captain R The Annoying F The Ghostly S The Dangerous G Professor T The Rancid H Doctor U The Invisible I Phantom V The Dastardly J The Brutal W The Atomic K The Unstoppable X The Mega L The Vile Y The Grand M The Dark Z The Vicious
  4. 7.

    Your last name A Shadow N Child B Wizard/Witch O

    Corpse C Tarantula P Slayer D Skull Q Spider E Mastermind R Creature F Wizard S Werewolf G Ninja T Monster H Devil U Vampire I Freak V Mutant J Beast W Robot K Criminal X Claw L Master Y Machine M Lord/Lady Z Clown
  5. 8.

    How to be an Evil Scientist 1. Choose an evil

    name ✔ 2. Share the most evil thing you’ve ever done
  6. 9.

    This is Billie • Consulting Engineer for Armakuni • Quite

    tall • Helps people use best practices • Favourite animal is the capybara • Evil Name - The Terrifying Monster • We stole this talk from her, turned it into a workshop and didn’t even say “thank-you”!
  7. 11.

    How to be an Evil Scientist 1. Choose an evil

    name ✔ 2. Share the most evil thing you’ve ever done ✔ 3. Learn the rules every evil scientist must follow
  8. 12.

    Evil Scientist Rules Always have lots of evil schemes -

    you never know if there’s going to be a sequel Always start small Always have an arch-enemy Always have an escape plan Always boast, there’s no point in being evil if you don’t boast about it Never wear capes Never get caught monologuing Always measure everything Always splice things together
  9. 13.

    How to be an Evil Scientist 1. Choose an evil

    name ✔ 2. Share the most evil thing you’ve ever done ✔ 3. Learn the rules every evil scientist must follow ✔ 4. Discover our arch enemies
  10. 14.

    Our Arch Enemies Waiting Around Kid Captain Defect General Heroics

    The Crimson Handoff Gold Plated Features Girl Mr Unneeded Process El Manual Work Awful Comms Boy Knowledge Drain Man Constance “Task” Switching The Relearner Rework
  11. 15.

    Our Arch Enemies Partially Completed Work Woman Dr Overly Complex

    Solutions The Siloed Worker Poor Visibility Man
  12. 16.

    Refuses to collaborate or attend meetings Works unsociable hours Code

    structure is in their head Believe they don’t need training Poor mentors The go-to person for QAs and support
  13. 17.

    How to be an Evil Scientist 1. Choose an evil

    name ✔ 2. Share the most evil thing you’ve ever done ✔ 3. Learn the rules every evil scientist must follow ✔ 4. Discover our arch enemies ✔
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    Ladies and gentlemen: the story you are about to hear

    is true. Only the names have been changed to protect the innocent.
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    ?

  20. 37.
  21. 46.

    What if Alex and Sam took the same approach and

    experimented with their teams?
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  25. 52.

    Empathise Design Thinking Evil Scientist Rules Always have lots of

    evil schemes - you never know if there’s going to be a sequel Always start small Never get caught monologuing Always measure everything Always splice things together Ideate Prototype Test Synthesise
  26. 53.

    Design thinking is a human-centered approach to innovation that draws

    from the designer's toolkit to integrate the needs of people, the possibilities of technology, and the requirements for business success. — Tim Brown, CEO of IDEO
  27. 55.

    Defining the stakeholders • Who will be impacted by the

    project? • Who will be responsible or accountable for the project? • Who will have decision authority on the project? • Who can support the project? • Who can obstruct the project? • Who has been involved in this type of project in the past? Keep informed Manage closely Monitor Anticipate and meet needs PMO CEO SA Ops Data PO BA UX EA Dev QA
  28. 56.

    A pattern of shared tacit assumptions that was learned by

    a group as it solved its problems of external adaptation and internal integration, that has worked well enough to be considered valid and, therefore, to be taught to new members as the correct way to perceive, think, and feel in relation to those problems. — Edgar Schein
  29. 57.

    Westrum typology to define culture Statement Your Score On my

    team, information is actively sought. On my team, failures are learning opportunities, and messengers of them are not punished. On my team, responsibilities are shared. On my team, cross-functional collaboration is encouraged and rewarded. On my team, failure causes enquiry. On my team, new ideas are welcomed. Likert Scale Strongly Disagree - 1 Disagree - 2 Somewhat disagree -3 Neither agree nor disagree - 4 Somewhat agree - 5 Agree - 6 Strongly agree - 7
  30. 58.

    Westrum typology to measure culture Pathological (power-oriented) Score 6-18 Bureaucratic

    (rule-oriented) Score 19 - 30 Generative (performance-oriented) Score 31-42 Low co-operation Modest co-operation High co-operation Messengers shot Messengers neglected Messengers trained Responsibilities shirked Narrow responsibilities Risks are shared Bridging discouraged Bridging tolerated Bridging encouraged Failure leads to scapegoating Failure leads to justice Failure leads to enquiry Novelty crushed Novelty leads to problems Novelty implemented
  31. 59.

    Team Cohesion Trust Conflict Commitment Accountability Results Building trust requires

    vulnerability Healthy conflict implies candid debate Commitment follows healthy conflict To take accountability takes prior commitment Focus on delivering measurable results. Collective and individual accountability, and feedback
  32. 60.

    Deployment frequency Four Key Metrics Lead Time for change Mean

    time to recovery Change failure percentage Stability Speed
  33. 62.

    The intent of maturity models is usually benign… because “maturity”

    sounds a bit… well…. patronizing. Plus, most of our models don’t involve progressing through different levels, and the primary audience is the team itself rather than management. — https://labs.spotify.com/2014/09/16/squad-health-check-model/
  34. 63.

    “Deployment is all automatic” “We security test git on push”

    “Commit to VCS and the customers have it in seconds” “Anyone can do a deploy!” Continuous Delivery Continuous Delivery “Deployment Joe is the only one who can do that” “That’s the security team’s job” “The customers get it a quarter later” “Only some people can deploy” “We find out direct from our users by... “Our kanban board shows all the work, and where it is” “Our stories usually last no than half a sprint” "We weren’t sure so we ran an experiment” Product & Process Product & Process “I don’t really know what our users think” “Sometimes work comes from the backlog except...” “Sometimes stories last multiple sprints” “That’s the way we’ve always done it” Insert here.... “Good statement” “Another good statement” “Good thing number three” “Fourth good thing” “Number five in the list of things that are good...” Insert here.... “Bad statement” “This thing is bad too” “Terrible, terrible, bad thing” “Bad thing which is the norm, everyone does it but really shouldn’t” “Bad thing that we didn’t even know was bad” “Rather than a sign off process we pair program” “The app gathers metrics and decide what’s next” “Our checks spotted the problem before our customers DID” “We only take on one thing at a time” Lean Management & Monitoring Lean Management & Monitoring “Oh we need to wait for CAB before we release” “No idea how the business decides what to do next” “The customer reported it” “We’re constantly doing 7 or 8 things” “It was a week before we even noticed” Code Quality “Absolutely everything is in source control” “We automatically test on every commit” “There’s only really the master branch” “I can add as many or as few examples as I need” Code Quality “It’s in source control except...” “We manually have a look” “Our branches are around forever and there are loads of them” “...but the data wasn’t like that on prod”
  35. 65.

    Value Stream Mapping CUSTOMER CREATE STORY --------- ANALYST DEVELOP FEATURE

    --------- ENGINEER DEPLOY TO PRE --------- DEL MGR TEST FEATURE --------- LCO AUTO. DEPLOY LT: 1D PT: 1H C&A: 90% AR: 14% LT: 15D PT: 1D C&A: 20% AR: 7% LT: 2D PT: 30 M C&A: 80% AR: 3.5% LT: 14D PT: 10D C&A: 60% AR: 71% TLT: 32D TPT: 11D 1H 30M AC&A: 60% TAR: 35%
  36. 67.
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    We believe <this capability> Will result in <this outcome> We

    will know we have succeeded when <we see a measurable signal>
  38. 71.

    What is our one priority? What do we need to

    learn? What is our riskiest assumption?
  39. 72.

    Time Box Is the experiment timely? Can we get data

    faster? Would less data be sufficient? Metrics Qualitative or quantitative? Is it actionable? Is it Measurable? Fail Condition (If this happens, our hypothesis is clearly false!) Early Stop (If this happens, stop! Experiment is broken, retro!) Plan How will you collect the data? Is it Specific? Is it Achievable? Link to any supporting documents.
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    x

  45. 84.

    x

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  48. 87.

    Formulating it as an experiment made it easy get permission

    to fail (even with a terrifying boss)
  49. 92.

    92 Today I learned hopefully something I will test that

    by doing something I will know it works for me when measure shows change in reading
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    Learning Goal • What do we need to learn? •

    What is our riskiest assumption? • What is our one priority?
  63. 108.

    Hypothesis/Assumptions • Is it falsifiable? • Is it specific? •

    Is it causal? (eg. If X the Y?) • Is it relevant to the learning goal?
  64. 109.

    Experiment Idea to Hypothesis We believe <this capability> Will result

    in <this outcome> We will know we have succeeded when <we see a measurable signal>
  65. 111.

    Code Quality Code Quality “Absolutely everything is in source control”

    “We automatically test on every commit” “There’s only really the master branch” “I can add as many or as few examples as I need” “It’s in source control except...” “We manually have a look” “Our branches are around forever and there are loads of them” “...but the data wasn’t like that on prod”
  66. 112.

    Continuous Delivery Continuous Delivery “Deployment is all automatic” “We security

    test git on push” “Commit to VCS and the customers have it in seconds” “Anyone can do a deploy!” “Deployment Joe is the only one who can do that” “That’s the security team’s job” “The customers get it a quarter later” “Only some people can deploy”
  67. 113.

    Architecture Architecture “We can deploy any bit alone” “Just our

    team maintains this” “We never break backwards compatibility” "We chose our own tools” “We can’t deploy this alone” “Our team and Team X work on this” “Accidentally, we broke our clients code” “We had to use what they told us”
  68. 114.

    Product & Process Product & Process “We find out direct

    from our users by... “Our kanban board shows all the work, and where it is” “Our stories usually last no than half a sprint” "We weren’t sure so we ran an experiment” “I don’t really know what our users think” “Sometimes work comes from the backlog except...” “Sometimes stories last multiple sprints” “That’s the way we’ve always done it”
  69. 115.

    Lean Management & Monitoring Lean Management & Monitoring “Rather than

    a sign off process we pair program” “The app gathers metrics and decide what’s next” “Our checks spotted the problem before our customers DID” “We only take on one thing at a time” “Oh we need to wait for CAB before we release” “No idea how the business decides what to do next” “The customer reported it” “We’re constantly doing 7 or 8 things” “It was a week before we even noticed”
  70. 116.

    Insert here.... Insert here.... “Good statement” “Another good statement” “Good

    thing number three” “Fourth good thing” “Number five in the list of things that are good...” “Bad statement” “This thing is bad too” “Terrible, terrible, bad thing” “Bad thing which is the norm, everyone does it but really shouldn’t” “Bad thing that we didn’t even know was bad”