Getting Your Point Across: Captain Picard vs Amelia Bedelia

6f6662ecab8176c54c3ad89ec158842c?s=47 Arthur Doler
September 06, 2019

Getting Your Point Across: Captain Picard vs Amelia Bedelia

Communicating with other humans can be hard sometimes. You could use the wrong words. An attempt to influence someone with a statement could backfire. Your opinion about something could slip out without meaning to ... and that’s without talking about body language and other nonverbal communication!

Even though you’ve been communicating since you were born, you can still get better at it. In this talk you’ll learn about high- and low-context cultures, how they differ, and how Captain Picard and Amelia Bedelia can have a conversation they both understand. You’ll learn what things humans communicate non-verbally, and how to use this effectively. You might even learn some things about listening. Come get a jump-start on the next conversation you have!

6f6662ecab8176c54c3ad89ec158842c?s=128

Arthur Doler

September 06, 2019
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Transcript

  1. Arthur Doler @arthurdoler arthurdoler@gmail.com Slides: HOW TO GET YOUR POINT

    ACROSS Captain Picard vs Amelia Bedelia
  2. None
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  4. WE EXIST IN A WORLD FULL OF BILLIONS OF OTHER

    PEOPLE
  5. http://esciencecommons.blogspot.com/2015/06/stone-tools-from-jordan-point-to-dawn.html

  6. TO GET ANYTHING DONE, WE NEED TO COMMUNICATE

  7. WE SEEM TO NEED TO COMMUNICATE

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  10. WHAT THIS TALK IS ABOUT

  11. Information vs Communication What a Context Is High Context vs

    Low Context False Cognates & Shibboleths Dealing with Conflict & Disagreements
  12. LET’S MEET OUR GUIDES ON THIS JOURNEY

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  14. https://twitter.com/FreyjaErlings/status/1122792633489817601, joke used with permission of the author

  15. Copyright Paramount Pictures, 1991

  16. None
  17. Text copyright Harper Collins. Date unknown.

  18. INFORMATION VS COMMUNICATION

  19. SHANNON INFORMATION

  20. Jacobs, Konrad [CC BY-SA 2.0 de (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/de/deed.en)]

  21. Reza (1994), An Introduction to Information Theory

  22. Reza (1994), An Introduction to Information Theory

  23. Reza (1994), An Introduction to Information Theory

  24. Reza (1994), An Introduction to Information Theory

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  29. Nonaka & Takeuchi, 1995

  30. BUT MOST IMPORTANT!

  31. Worthington, 2015

  32. NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION

  33. •Kinesics (body language) •Proxemics (distance) •Paralanguage (tone of voice) •Haptics

    (touch) •Eye contact •Frequency of glances •Patterns of fixation •Oculesics (blink rate) Giri, (2009)
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  35. Chartrand & Bargh, 1999

  36. Pfeifer, Iacoboni, Mazziotta, & Daprettoa,2007

  37. REMEMBER, WE’RE SOCIAL ANIMALS

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  39. CONTEXTS

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  43. National Instruments - http://www.ni.com/cms/images/devzone/tut/DataFinder_in_DIAdem.png

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  45. Copyright Paramount Pictures, 1991

  46. National Instruments - http://www.ni.com/cms/images/devzone/tut/DIAdem_VIEW.PNG

  47. None
  48. JunkCharts - https://junkcharts.typepad.com/junk_charts/2013/01/ruining-the-cake-with-too-much-icing.html

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  51. WHAT THE HECK IS GOING ON?

  52. Matzen, Trumbo, Leach, and Leshikar, 2015

  53. Edelman, 2008

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  55. Ferguson, Lennox-Terrion, Ahmed, & Jaya, 2014

  56. SHARED CONTEXTS •Western Cultural Context •Startup Context •Company-Specific Context

  57. Würtz, 2005

  58. HIGH CONTEXT VS LOW CONTEXT CULTURES

  59. None
  60. FEWER WORDS PER MESSAGE Hall, 1989

  61. EXPLANATION IS SPARSE; THE CULTURE FILLS IN Hall, 1989

  62. INDIVIDUAL WORDS CAN MEAN A LOT Hall, 1989

  63. MORE IDIOMS Hall, 1989

  64. MORE HOMOGENOUS /EXCLUSIVE Hall, 1989

  65. None
  66. MORE WORDS PER MESSAGE Hall, 1989

  67. TENDS TO EXPLAIN THINGS FURTHER Hall, 1989

  68. VALUE OF A SINGLE WORD IS LESS IMPORTANT Hall, 1989

  69. USED MORE IN HETEROGENEOUS POPULATIONS Hall, 1989

  70. BOTH BUSINESS AND TECH TEND TO USE HIGH-CONTEXT COMMUNICATION Würtz,

    2005
  71. COMMUNICATING WELL IN CONTEXT

  72. KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE

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  76. FALSE COGNATES

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  80. AVOID MISUNDERSTANDING BY UNPACKING TERMS

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  84. DON’T USE JARGON/SHIBBOLETHS

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  86. SHIBBOLETH (N): FROM HEBREW ŠIBBŌLEṮ, “EAR OF CORN” A CUSTOM,

    PRINCIPLE, OR BELIEF DISTINGUISHING A PARTICULAR CLASS OR GROUP OF PEOPLE, ESPECIALLY A LONG-STANDING ONE REGARDED AS OUTMODED OR NO LONGER IMPORTANT. From Oxford English Dictionary via Google (define: shibboleth)
  87. SQL

  88. XAML

  89. INSTANCE

  90. SCHEDULING

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  92. TACIT VS EXPLICIT KNOWLEDGE

  93. Nonaka & Takeuchi, 1995

  94. Nonaka & Takeuchi, 1995

  95. Kahneman, Thinking Fast and Slow

  96. Kahneman, Thinking Fast and Slow

  97. Kahneman, Thinking Fast and Slow

  98. None
  99. REACH FOR ANALOGY OR METAPHOR

  100. EXPRESS IT NONVERBALLY

  101. COMMUNICATE THE FEELING AND GIVE IT TIME

  102. CONFLICT IN COMMUNICATION

  103. SEEK FIRST TO UNDERSTAND Covey, 1989

  104. ACTIVE LISTENING

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  107. 1. FULLY CONCENTRATE, LISTEN, & REMEMBER Atwater, 1981

  108. 2. DON’T JUST THINK ABOUT WHAT YOU’RE GONNA SAY NEXT!

    Atwater, 1981
  109. 3. REPEAT WHAT THEY SAID BACK TO THEM Atwater, 1981

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  111. FIND A FRIENDLY PARTICIPANT & ALTERNATE LISTENING

  112. GO GET IN ARGUMENTS (NOT ON THE INTERNET)

  113. OTHER CONFLICT MANAGEMENT METHODS

  114. ASSUME YOU MIGHT ACTUALLY BE WRONG

  115. ASSUME THEY MIGHT BE RIGHT

  116. COGNITIVE EMPATHY

  117. Gerace, Day, Casey, & Mohr, 2013

  118. Ross, Greene, and House, 1977

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  121. KNOW YOUR CONTEXTS

  122. ACTIVELY LISTEN

  123. EXPLORE & EXPERIENCE MANY CONTEXTS YOURSELF

  124. MIRROR OTHER PEOPLE

  125. PRACTICE YOUR COGNITIVE EMPATHY

  126. Slides: Arthur Doler @arthurdoler arthurdoler@gmail.com