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The REAL Programme in Kirklees

The REAL Programme in Kirklees

How to sign up for the Making it REAL project in Kirklees

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Alison Whitmore

June 21, 2019
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  1. The REAL Programme National Children’s Bureau The University of Sheffield

  2. Kirklees REAL Launch Event Speakers today: • Ellie Suggate-Francis, Early

    Childhood Unit NCB • Professor Cathy Nutbrown, The University of Sheffield • Beverley Richards, Kirklees • Zaynab Rajah, REAL Practitioner Agenda • Project Overview and Background • The original Sheffield REAL Project – Prof. Cathy Nutbrown • Project detail • The Kirklees perspective – Beverley Richards & Zaynab Rajah • Opportunity for discussion in groups • Questions • Next steps
  3. Background: The Home Learning Environment • Nationally two fifths of

    disadvantaged 5 year olds are not meeting expected literacy standards. • Less-advantaged children fall behind peers in the early years and that gap widens throughout school. • There is significant variance across England. Many children at age 5 in the North are far behind those in the South. The strength of the Home Learning Environment is a significant factor in children’s attainment. Disadvantaged children are less likely to experience a home environment that supports early language and literacy development HOWEVER: The quality of the HLE has been shown to be equally as important as socioeconomic factors.
  4. Background: Education Endowment Foundation The Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) has

    partnered with the Department for Education to test projects that support parents to help improve their child’s early language and literacy skills at home. • £5 Million will be spent in disadvantaged areas in the North of England testing projects that have shown considerable evidence of promise. • This funding is a key part of the DfE’s plan to close the ‘word gap’, set out in ‘Unlocking Talent, Fulfilling Potential’ (social mobility paper), and part of the DfE’s commitment in the ‘Northern Powerhouse’ strategy. In 2018 NCB undertook a rigorous application process, and were successful in winning funding to evaluate ‘The REAL Programme’: Raising Early Achievement in Literacy.
  5. Raising Early Achievement in Literacy Professor Cathy Nutbrown, BEd, Med,

    PhD Professor of Education The University of Sheffield
  6. The REAL Project, the ORIM Framework and the Impact on

    Young Children’s Early Literacy Development Professor Cathy Nutbrown University of Sheffield, School of Education 21 June 2019
  7. The Sheffield REAL Project 30 years of early literacy work

    with families
  8. Key elements of the REAL Project Home visits Provision of

    literacy resources Centre-based activities Special events Postal communication between the child and the programme teacher Adult education opportunities The ORIM Framework A Randomised Control Trial
  9. Mutual respect and partnership Above all, teachers worked from a

    value position of mutual respect and partnership with families. Their starting points were the individual circumstances of each family with the aim of building respectful, collaborative partnerships on this foundation, where each partner could contribute their own distinct knowledge and skills to their joint work.
  10. The ORIM framework EARLY LITERACY STRANDS Print Books Writing Oral

    Language FAMILIES PROVIDE Opportunities Recognition Interaction Model
  11. Conceptualising early literacy for the ORIM framework SOME LITERACY STRANDS

    Print Books Writing Oral Language Environmental print Packaging Adverts Street signs TV texts Junk mail Digital text Good quality children’s books Picture books Story books Non-fiction Electronic books Early mark making Invented spelling Writing to communicate Storytelling Vocabulary Phonological awareness Talk about written language
  12. Four things parents can provide to facilitate socio-cultural learning Opportunities

    No opportunities, no learning – may require materials, situations, permission, practice. Recognition Other people recognise achievement, provide feedback and encourage Interaction co-operation, scaffolding, instruction Models Children see others doing things - often wanting to be like them.
  13. The ORIM framework EARLY LITERACY STRANDS Print Books Writing Oral

    Language FAMILIES PROVIDE Opportunities Recognition Interaction Model
  14. The ORIM framework EARLY LITERACY STRANDS Print Books Writing Oral

    Language FAMILIES PROVIDE Opportunities Recognition Interaction Model
  15. The ORIM framework EARLY LITERACY STRANDS Print Books Writing Oral

    Language FAMILIES PROVIDE Opportunities Recognition Interaction Model
  16. The ORIM framework EARLY LITERACY STRANDS Print Books Writing Oral

    Language FAMILIES PROVIDE Opportunities Recognition Interaction Model
  17. The ORIM framework EARLY LITERACY STRANDS Print Books Writing Oral

    Language FAMILIES PROVIDE Opportunities Recognition Interaction Model
  18. The ORIM framework EARLY LITERACY STRANDS Print Books Writing Oral

    Language FAMILIES PROVIDE Opportunities Recognition Interaction Model
  19. The ORIM framework EARLY LITERACY STRANDS Print Books Writing Oral

    Language FAMILIES PROVIDE Opportunities Recognition Interaction Model
  20. The ORIM framework EARLY LITERACY STRANDS Print Books Writing Oral

    Language FAMILIES PROVIDE Opportunities Recognition Interaction Model
  21. The ORIM framework EARLY LITERACY STRANDS Print Books Writing Oral

    Language FAMILIES PROVIDE Opportunities Recognition Interaction Model
  22. Can we influence every cell? EARLY LITERACY STRANDS Print Books

    Writing Oral Language FAMILIES PROVIDE Opportunities Recognition Interaction Model
  23. Does REAL make a difference?

  24. Does REAL make a difference?

  25. Main findings from REAL Project RCT  Effects of intervention

    at socio-cultural level was discernible in measures of children’s literacy  Effects vary for different sub-groups  Other encouraging findings –  parents like the programme and keep going  parents do things between home visits  parents see changes in literacy capabilities and confidence in their children  fathers as well as mothers get involved  practitioners learn more about the families  practitioners are more confident in sharing their knowledge with parents
  26. http://www.real-online.group.shef.ac.uk Join the ORIM Network ORIM@sheffield.ac.uk

  27. The Evaluation • A large scale Randomised Control Trial will

    be conducted involving 120 schools with nursery classes, and 960 children. • 60 of the schools will be control schools, 60 intervention. 480 intervention children and families will receive REAL (8 children per school). • The evaluation will be structured as a randomised controlled trial which will compare the progress of children who receive The REAL Programme with a ‘business as usual’ control group. • The intervention will begin in January 2020. • The primary outcome will be literacy, as measured through independently administered tests at the beginning and end of the trial. The secondary outcome will explore changes in the home learning environment as a result of the intervention. • The evaluation report will be published in Autumn 2021.
  28. The Evaluation • Note: the project is over 4 terms

    and moves with the child into Reception Year REAL Programme (Intervention) Schools Teachers undertake professional development, plan together and work with children and families through a series of home visits and centre- based events. Each family receives a monthly contact during term time from the teacher as a minimum. Teachers work with children and families in the home regularly, leaving materials and continuation tasks and suggest ideas for completion of literacy activities. Teachers have half a day a week release from the classroom to work with a cohort of 8 children (aged 3-5) and families over a period of 4 terms, both individually and in groups.
  29. The Evaluation Please note: Schools choosing to take part in

    The REAL Programme are unable to also take part in any other EEF Home Learning Environment funded trials, a full list of which can be found on the EEF website. Control Group Schools This group will not receive training or participate in The REAL Programme. These schools will receive funding that should be put towards alternative support. This group is essential for us to understand if and how REAL works, and will be required to participate in child assessments.
  30. The Areas & Timeline Areas NCB are currently working with

    3 Councils in the North of England to identify schools suitable and willing to take part: Kirklees; Knowsley; and Salford Timeline • Jan – July 2019 Project set up and school recruitment • July 2019 Deadline for school sign up and MOU’s in place • Sept – Dec 2019 Selection of intervention/control pupils & baseline testing • January 2020 Four days of teacher training to intervention schools • Jan 20 – Feb 21 Intervention: Min. of 8 home visits per child & 4 events • March 2021 Final child assessments – intervention & control schools
  31. NatCen will undertake the pupil assessments, using trained Speech and

    Language Therapists who will come to your school. Parent consent will have been gained in advance. • PELI (15 minutes) is a psychometrically tested assessment embedded within a set of 10 child-friendly storybooks. The story books address five early literacy dimensions: phonological awareness, alphabet knowledge, vocabulary, oral language, and comprehension. • The Sheffield Early Literacy Development Profile (10 minutes) assesses children’s early writing skills. • The Home Learning Environment Index – given to parents to take home, complete and return. Pupil Assessment
  32. • Intervention schools receive £700 per child – total of

    £5,600 for 8 children to support staff cover to deliver the programme. This will be paid in instalments. • Control schools receive £1000 to take part. • Expected that both payments to be initiated once baseline testing has taken place Funding
  33. The Kirklees Perspective Beverley Richards: Senior Kirklees Learning Partner Zaynab

    Rajah: Kirklees trained REAL Practitioner
  34. Kirklees Perspective Beverley Richards Senior Learning Partner 0-11

  35. Priority Areas in EYFS • Continue to reduce the gender

    gap to be at least in line with the national gender gap. • Continue to increase outcomes in CLLD impacting on reading and writing. • Supporting improvements in the teaching of maths. • To increase the number of children leaving reception with secure phase 3 phonics to enable a higher proportion to pass the phonics check in year 1.
  36. Headline figures - EYFS 1.2 % increase on last year

    68.2% National increase of 0-8% Closing the gap (2.1%) slowly
  37. Below or in line with regional in all measures except

    PSED 1.6% below national Reading 2.2% below national writing 2.4% below national Maths Curriculum areas
  38. Parental Engagement “Building parental engagement leads to improvements in their

    confidence and ability to provide a high quality learning environment, which in turn has a major impact on children’s achievement.” Joseph Rowntree Foundation report 2013 “ Holistic interventions involving strong engagement between parents, schools and the wider community are necessary to narrow the attainment gap.” Hilary Grayson - Rapid Review of Parental Engagement and Narrowing the Gap in Attainment for Disadvantaged Children - 2013 Approaches that focus on developing parents own skills, for example by providing structured training, can have a moderate positive impact on learning. In general, more intensive approaches, which target particular families or outcomes, are associated with higher learning gains. EEF parental engagement toolkit April 2019
  39. Oracy

  40. Oracy

  41. None
  42. Work undertaken in Kirklees • Lead by Children Centre Teachers/Community

    Teachers and Early Years consultants • In targeted schools and settings • With the most vulnerable children and families in disadvantaged areas of Kirklees.
  43. None
  44. Chatter with your children in the Forest Making different sounds

    in the forest! Describing the woodland animals and guessing the right one! Playing the ‘Guess the instrument game.’ The treasure hunt game The ‘Musical Bag goes round ‘ game
  45. Chatter with your children in the forest Listening to a

    sound and copying each other. Being a sound detective and finding objects to match the different letters Sharing books together Making a sound picture
  46. Sustainability creating the beginnings of a school community Each year

    since • May half term to July “Getting ready for school” • Half a day per week:6 week programme for New Nursery and Reception children and their families of play based activities and pastoral contact. • It occurs within the school day, led by two Nursery Nurses • Involves forest activities, reading stories, oral story telling, fine motor/ gross motor/ sessions in school hall and the EY unit • A clear programme planned carefully so staff can spot any concerns with SEND pupils highlighted and therefore early referral to SALT/ OT or meeting with SENCO to begin early identification/ support for parents. • The primary focus is Relationship Building between new mums, dads and staff who are attending so support networks are established within and beyond the school gate. Littletown J I and N school 2019
  47. An example of a shared talking opportunity used in targeted

    interventions with children, parents and younger siblings Paddock School
  48. Influencing the home learning environment “ We have been out

    and collected twigs and leaves from the park to take home and make pictures. We also put them into water and set them in ice. We now play spotting games on the way to school.” “My son and I have really enjoyed the Rhyme Challenge. It has reminded me of Nursery Rhymes I had forgotten and we sing them a lot in the car now as a result of doing them at the Children’s Centre.”
  49. Measuring impact of the work • Feedback from parents who

    engaged • Levels of engagement with parents • Progress of individual pupils in the CLLD and PSED strand of the EYFSP • Sustainability
  50. Post Questionnaires – Littletown J I and N • Parents

    increased their scores in understanding how to join in with their child’s play • Parents increased their scores in understanding which types of play help their child to play alongside and share with other children • Parents increased their scores in understanding which types of play will help their child to learn about sounds and to listen • Parents commented on children’s concentration had improved • Parents commented on how the sessions had given them quality one to one time to spend with each other. It has been useful to have the time for me and A to play together without the distraction of having to get other jobs done I enjoyed all the activities and I was very happy to see my child happy enjoying every moment of it. L is learning his sounds to start reading, the rhythm games were helpful. They also both enjoyed the singing and instruments. My child’s concentration was better as we were one to one and because of the environment.
  51. Attendance Number of families who attended 14 families targeted 14

    families started the sessions 8 families completed the sessions Families included 1 BME parent, 1 lone parent and 1 Dad Super output areas Families who started 20% most deprived - 5 30% most deprived - 3 40% most deprived - 3 50-100% least deprived - 3 Families who completed 20% most deprived - 1 30% most deprived - 3 40% most deprived - 1 50-100% lease deprived - 3
  52. Category Total across all early learning intervention projects 2013 -

    2014 Number of children reached through targeted small group interventions with Community Teacher (CT) 119 Number of parents reached through targeted small group interventions with CT. 102 Number of younger siblings reached through targeted small group interventions with CT. 24 Volume of children who attended universal family learning events 1136 Volume of parents/carers who attended universal family learning events 787 Professionals involved from other services 58
  53. The Impact of parental engagement on PSED scores for children

    in a targeted group 2013-14 Data based on 22 children. Progress measured from baseline on entry to reception to end of reception year. Typical and good progress as a % for children whose parents engaged in the intervention Typical and good progress as a % for children whose parents did not engage in the intervention Making relationships 28% 25% Self confidence and self awareness 84% 25% Managing feelings and behaviour 84% 75%
  54. The impact of parental engagement on CLLD scores for children

    engaged in the making a Targeted group 2013-14 Data based on 22 children. Progress measured from baseline on entry to reception to end of reception year. Typical and good progress as a % for children whose parents engaged in the intervention Typical and good progress as a % for children whose parents did not engage in the intervention Listening and attention 42% 28% Understanding 70% 14% Speaking 84% 14%
  55. Sustainability “Following on from Kirklees Early Learning Interventions that were

    planned and facilitated last year……. “Nursery have run breakfast club since January and Abida and Rhian are continuing the birth to two group which continues to be popular. We are also planning on introducing the nursery children to school dinners again through role play and parent taster sessions as last year. We have a phonics event planned for this term and are using our mini bus to run chatter in the park through out the summer term. I have been working with key stage 1 on holding events for parents too as the children's parents who had moved into year 1 from reception were asking for them. We held a literacy event in the autumn term and are planning further events including a library visit. I can't believe the momentum the project is gaining we are hoping to take it into key stage 2 next year!” F. Brant Foundation Stage Co-Ordinator – Heckmondwike Primary School Participated in Kirklees Early Learning Intervention Project 2012-2013.
  56. ORIM Raising Early Achievement in Literacy Al Noor Nursery Blenheim

    Play group Park Pre school
  57. Raising Early Achievement in Literacy Getting the dads involved ………………

  58. Raising Early Achievement in Literacy Getting the dads involved ………………

  59. Raising Early Achievement in Literacy Getting the dads involved ………………

  60. Raising Early Achievement in Literacy Getting the dads involved ………………

  61. • Seen a shift in parental involvement • Parents /careers

    more confident in creating opportunities for children More confident in modelling and supporting their children out side the nursery. This mean learning continues outside setting. • Data – school leavers 2019 • 91% working at ARE in Reading • 88% working at ARE in writing • Overall Children are more confident. • Massive improvement from previous years. Al Noor Nursery Batley Carr Community Centre Hyrstland Road WF17 7JT 07861 735 370 alnoornursery@hotmail.co.uk
  62. Benefits of taking part If randomly allocated to the intervention

    group: • Child: The most disadvantaged children benefit the most, with literacy levels significantly improved, and long term improved outcomes for the child • Family: The Home learning environment improves (impacting on siblings too), and parents gain confidence and become better engaged with the school • Teacher: 4 days of Early Literacy CPD with Professor Cathy Nutbrown • School: Improved EYFSP levels of children with a Good Level of Development- literacy, communication and language. • Field of early literacy: better understanding of interventions that work.
  63. Group Discussion: Please take some time to consider this project,

    discuss with your peers, and prepare any questions you may have. Group Discussion & Questions
  64. If you would like your school to take part: •

    Ensure you have read the NatCen document: ‘Evaluation of The REAL Programme: Information for Nurseries and Schools’ • Read and sign The REAL Programme Memorandum of Understanding Head Teachers sign first and last page of MOU and send over Next steps
  65. If you are a primary school with a nursery class,

    we would like you to take part in this project. If you require further information please contact: Ellie Suggate-Francis, Principal Officer in the Early Childhood Unit, NCB: esuggate-francis@ncb.org.uk For more detailed information about REAL please refer to the following link: http://www.real-online.group.shef.ac.uk/aboutreal-text.html Next steps