Design Thinking for Librarians

Design Thinking for Librarians

Keynote talk, Southwest Wisconsin Association of Libraries Annual Conference. October 2016.

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Brianna Marshall

October 07, 2016
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Transcript

  1. Southwest Wisconsin Association of Libraries Annual Conference 10.7.16 | BRIANNA

    MARSHALL DESIGN THINKING FOR LIBRARIANS
  2. ABOUT ME Email: brianna.marshall@wisc.edu Twitter: @notsosternlib Digital Curation Coordinator, UW-Madison

    Libraries • Research data management • Institutional repository • Digital scholarship So, a lot of: • Community building • Project management • Strategic service planning
  3. None
  4. DESIGN THINKING = DT

  5. MY EXPERIENCES WITH D/T How I first got started with

    this design thinking thing.
  6. None
  7. DT IN BROADER CULTURE

  8. Creative Confidence Tom + David Kelley

  9. Creativity loves constraints.

  10. The Design Thinking Toolkit http://designthinkingforlibraries.com/

  11. 1. DT Toolkit Guide (121 pages) 2. DT Activities Workbook

    (60 pages) 3. DT in a Day (17 pages) Download each free PDF guide at: designthinkingforlibraries.com
  12. WHAT DESIGN THINKING IS + WHY IT MATTERS Overview and

    context for design thinking.
  13. None
  14. You might be thinking... ◇ This sounds pretty cheesy. ◇

    It’s way overhyped/trendy right now. ◇ I’m not creative. ◇ I don’t have any issues solving problems. ◇ Etc.
  15. … have you ever felt stuck? Image courtesy of Flickr

    user lisajeans (CC BY ND)
  16. Image courtesy of Flickr user 121584717@N03 (CC BY ND)

  17. WHY LIBRARIES? DTT page 15

  18. HUMAN CENTERED DESIGN

  19. YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE A DESIGNER - OR EVEN

    THINK OF YOURSELF AS CREATIVE - TO MAKE DESIGN THINKING WORK FOR YOU.
  20. AN APPROACH + A MINDSET DTT page 6

  21. [ beginner’s mindset ]

  22. CASE STUDY 1: MRI REDESIGN

  23. CASE STUDY 1: MRI REDESIGN

  24. Image used courtesy of mojohelpdesk.com

  25. CPL CASE STUDY ◇ The team: 4 children’s librarians +

    1 branch manager ◇ Their question: How might we integrate play into CPL’s core services? DTT page 11-14
  26. CPL: INSPIRATION ◇ Interviewed + observed at nearby locations for

    children, including several interactive children’s museums ◇ Interviewed experts on play, including two librarians with opposing views on its value ◇ Interviewed families to understand “how they use the library together, and how the library fits into the larger context of their lives.” (11) DTT page 11-14
  27. CPL: IDEATION The team began generating ideas by sharing stories,

    piecing together patterns, and documenting findings, including: ◇ Libraries are perceived as the third safe place between school and home, and therefore there is potentially more permission to experiment with offerings. ◇ The library should be part of the investigative process in a child’s life. ◇ Parents and librarians have a tendency to want to control or structure play, so new programs have to balance a need for control with a need for flexibility that is inherent in play activities. ◇ Parents of school-aged children want a separation between play and study. DTT page 11-14
  28. CPL: IDEATION ◇ Next, they brainstormed ways to turn insight

    into actionable ideas and prototypes. ◇ In five hours, they worked with foam core, toys, and other materials on hand to prototype a new children’s space that allowed children to tell stories to one another. DTT page 11-14
  29. CPL: ITERATION Prototype #1: Interactive Storytelling Window ◇ Set up

    stage and props at Chinatown branch ◇ Intentionally required little facilitation or involvement from librarians ◇ Observed and gathered feedback from children and parents DTT page 11-14
  30. CPL: ITERATION Prototype #1: Interactive Storytelling Window Important points learned:

    1. Older children were too self-conscious to perform in an open space 2. Children wanted to draw on the white boards, not write down stories. DTT page 11-14
  31. CPL: ITERATION Prototype #2: Real-time Comics ◇ Children were invited

    to recreate known comic book characters or create their own, then respond to others’ creations ◇ Event focused on interaction vs. performance ◇ Library staff more involved in inviting children to draw in the windows and create mini-comics DTT page 11-14
  32. CPL: ITERATION Prototype #2: Real-time Comics Important points learned: ◇

    Children were willing to collaborate in telling stories ◇ Children loved an activity like writing on the walls, which they couldn’t do at home ◇ Families need structure in activities, at least until play in the library becomes normal ◇ Families need permission to be loud. Some staff would need to change views about noise and control, which may require training. DTT page 11-14
  33. CPL: SCALING UP A new design challenge: Now that they

    had some good ideas, how could CPL translate them across different branches? ◇ Focus on librarian roles rather than tools or materials ◇ Sensitivity to local branch cultures ◇ Introduces possibilities for both repurposing existing space and developing new space ◇ Setting flexible yet achievable goals, ie, “every branch having at least one service, space or program that demonstrates the value of play and storytelling in childhood learning.” (DTT, 14) Caveat: Details for how CPL transmitted these ideas across branch libraries / whether they met these goals are sparse. DTT page 11-14
  34. CPL: SCALING UP CPL framework addressing qualities of different branch

    libraries. DTT page 11-14
  35. DTT page 16

  36. Image courtesy of Flickr user 1234abcd (CC BY)

  37. Team Building Tips ◇ Work within your routine ◇ Start

    small (2-5 people) ◇ Team diversity leads to more creative solutions! ◇ Share a home base ◇ Discuss roles for team members - especially the leader role DTT page 20-21
  38. Image courtesy of Flickr user 121617458@N03 (CC BY ND)

  39. D/T Prep: Habits + Logistics ◇ Find a project space

    - even just a wall works! ◇ Protect team time (recurring meetings) ◇ What’s your communication strategy? ◇ Don’t be afraid to visualize ideas as you go ◇ Externalize thoughts through big post-its that team members can see, rather than jotting things down in a private notebook ◇ Document! Document! Document! You’ll be glad you did. DTT page 23
  40. Flavors of Design Thinking Image courtesy of Flickr user titlab

    (CC BY)
  41. Facilitated, team-based DT A la carte DT Impromptu DT

  42. Facilitated Design Thinking • Set roles and responsibilities (primarily facilitator

    / team lead) • Schedule commitment • Dedication to following DT principles and processes (within reason) ◦ Inspiration ◦ Ideation ◦ Iteration
  43. A La Carte Design Thinking • Using elements of DT

    process in your practice, either day-to-day or project-based • Flexibility is key - using the process less formally may make you more comfortable with it over time
  44. Impromptu Design Thinking • Carving out time to do DT

    - even without a major project • Allows for shorter, quicker mini-sessions to tackle problems • Creativity re-boost • Sister of the “make day” ?
  45. My Design Thinking Reflections • DT process was both uncomfortable

    and freeing • A facilitator is pretty necessary, especially when the process is new • As a non-visual person, rapid prototyping pushed me out of my comfort zone FAST • Shared vocabulary and terminology help • Trust the process!
  46. 1. DT Toolkit Guide (121 pages) 2. DT Activities Workbook

    (60 pages) 3. DT in a Day (17 pages) Download each free PDF guide at: designthinkingforlibraries.com
  47. thank you! brianna.marshall@wisc.edu