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Wit on the web

92c6fcd3c1e72b85af8acbf706d4f5a4?s=47 Helen Clark
April 13, 2016

Wit on the web

Talk from Design Exchange Nottingham.

There’s no doubt that improving user experience is increasingly at the forefront of designers’ and clients’ minds. But is the web still missing something more fun? I’ll be looking at what web designers can learn from graphic design concepts and how we can incorporate wit and humour into websites and tasks to create an emotional and connected user experience.

92c6fcd3c1e72b85af8acbf706d4f5a4?s=128

Helen Clark

April 13, 2016
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Transcript

  1. Wit on the web Helen Clark - CX web designer

    @littlehelli
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  3. Is there something missing?

  4. The needs of our users

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  6. “What if an interface could help you complete a critical

    task and put a smile on your face? That would be an experience you’d recommend to a friend; that would be an idea worth spreading.” Aaron Walter, Designing for Emotion
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  10. “Although wit is often humorous, it is not invariably so.

    Some witty ideas provoke a laugh, some a smile, some an inward nod of respect, some a feeling of awe.” Beryl MacAlhone & David Stuart, A Smile in the Mind
  11. Turner Duckworth

  12. Moon Brand

  13. Glad Creative

  14. TWA/NEBOKO

  15. Ogilvy & Mather

  16. TBWA
 Istanbul, Turkey

  17. “There are different forms of wit for different forms of

    communications. Similarly there are different roles for wit within a design. Within websites, wit may only have a supporting role.” Beryl MacAlhone & David Stuart, A Smile in the Mind
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  20. Reflective Behavioural Visceral Three levels of brain processing

  21. Reflective Behavioural Visceral Three levels of brain processing

  22. Reflective Behavioural Visceral Three levels of brain processing

  23. Reflective Behavioural Visceral Three levels of brain processing

  24. Three levels of brain processing Reflective Behavioural Visceral

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  30. Three levels of brain processing Reflective Behavioural Visceral

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  33. ”So pleased to have found this software. I’ve wanted it

    for a while now and was saving up. Now I can treat myself to some of the other software I have been studying and trying during my 5 hour egg hunt.”
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  35. “The first time I loaded an email up, I felt

    bad seeing his arm break. Over the course of several campaigns, I shrunk the width of our messages. Now I'm down to 680px and now I feel much better for no longer breaking the poor MailChimp's arm.”
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  40. Candidates for
 added wit

  41. “The more empathy, trust and love that brands stream out,

    the more that comes back in a multiplier effect.” Kevin Roberts Executive Chairman Saatchi & Saatchi Wit can… increase brand loyalty
  42. “Introducing surprise into an interface can break a behaviour pattern

    and force the brain to reassess the situation.” Aaron Walter, Designing for emotion Wit can… shift expectation
  43. “Experience is critical, for it determines how fondly people remember

    their interactions. Was the overall experience positive, or frustrating?” Donald Norman, The Design of Everyday Things Wit can… be memorable
  44. Not all brand personalities can support wit and humour When

    humour is shoe-horned into a different personality it can come across as disingenuous People might not get it What are the risks?
  45. Using wit in design is risky. Some people won’t get

    it. Some will even hate it. But surely an emotional response to design is better than indifference?
  46. What could you do to put a smile in the

    mind of your users?
  47. Reading material A Smile in the Mind: Witty Thinking in

    Graphic Design
 Beryl McAlhone, David Stuart, Greg Quinton, Nick Asbury Designing for emotion
 Aaron Walter The Design of Everyday things
 Donald Norman