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Hops

 Hops

A talk on hops, given by Darren Oakley at the July 2015 London Amateur Brewers meeting.

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London Amateur Brewers

July 06, 2015
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Transcript

  1. Hops Darren Oakley London Amateur Brewers, July 2015 London Amateur

    Brewers, July 2015
  2. Overview — Hops 101 — Essential Hop Oils — Hopping

    Techniques / Tools — New and Upcoming Hop Varieties London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  3. Hops 101 London Amateur Brewers, July 2015

  4. Different “Types” — Bittering — Used at the start of

    (or early on in) the boil — Flavour / Aroma — Used late in the boil — Used after the boil and in dry hopping — Dual-Purpose — Can be used at any time London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  5. Alpha Acids — The most commonly referred to acids in

    hops — Provide most of the bittering effect — Five main alpha acids: — Humulone, Cohumulone, Adhumulone, Posthumulone, Prehumulone http://craftbeeracademy.com/the-science-behind-hops-part-1-alpha-and-beta-acids/ London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  6. Alpha Acids — Basically... — Humulone is a soft bitterness

    — Cohumulone is a harsh bitterness — The rest are kind of a mystery! — When looking for a hop high in alpha acids, the general rule is high humulone and low cohumulone. http://craftbeeracademy.com/the-science-behind-hops-part-1-alpha-and-beta-acids/ London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  7. Beta Acids — Most people don’t really know what they

    do, but they’re still important — Beta acids are comprised of three main types: — Lupulone, Colupulone, Adlupulone http://craftbeeracademy.com/the-science-behind-hops-part-1-alpha-and-beta-acids/ London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  8. Beta Acids — Alpha acids dissolve into solution almost immediately

    after adding to the boil, beta acids break down over time — Best seen in beer storage and lagering http://craftbeeracademy.com/the-science-behind-hops-part-1-alpha-and-beta-acids/ London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  9. Essential Hop Oils London Amateur Brewers, July 2015

  10. Myrcene — 63.9 °C boiling point, the largest of the

    hop oils — 40-60% of oil content in many American varieties (Cascade has 50-60%) — Most noble hops are low in myrcene (Saaz: 5-13%) London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  11. Myrcene — It has a herbal note that can be

    described as green, balsamic, hoppy in small quantities, also has a slight piney/citrus flavour — As a result of its low boiling point, it is present in much higher quantities in dry hopped or steep- hopped beers London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  12. Humulene — 99 °C boiling point — Humulene is the

    traditional noble hop oil, providing a strong herbal component most people associate with noble hops London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  13. Humulene — Over long boils, it also tends to produce

    a slightly spicy flavour - such as that from Saaz hops in light lagers or Nugget — Because it boils just below the boiling point of water, it usually provides its best characteristics as either a late boil addition or post-boil addition London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  14. Caryophellene — 129 °C boiling point — Caryophellene is a

    counterpoint to humulene - and provides a spicy, woody, earthy and even citrusy flavour London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  15. Caryophellene — Clove and pepper contain this oil in significant

    quantities — While not a significant in noble hops, Caryophellene is a major aroma component in many traditional English hops such as Goldings and Northdown as well as many US hops such as Mount Hood London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  16. Farnesene — 95-125 °C boiling point — Found in the

    coating of apples and other fruits, it provides the “green apple” flavour as well as flowery, citrusy, woody and at the extreme end musty, woody or vegetative — The smallest of the hop oils - typically less than 1% of the hop oil content, but it can be higher in many noble varieties London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  17. Hopping Techniques London Amateur Brewers, July 2015

  18. Kettle Hopping — Bittering — Add hops early in the

    boil — Maximum time to isomerise the alpha acids London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  19. Kettle Hopping — Flavour — Add hops late in the

    boil (last 15 mins) — Not so much IBU contribution, more about oil extraction London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  20. Kettle Hopping — Aroma — Add hops very late in

    the boil (last 5 mins), or after — Again very little IBU contribution, more about oil extraction London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  21. Dry Hopping — Dry hopping is simply the technique of

    adding hops to wort in the fermenter — Why? — Extraction of hop oils (aroma/flavour) into the finished beer London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  22. Dry Hopping — How? — Add hops to the fermenter

    at (or close to) target gravity — Agitate regularly for a day or two London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  23. Dry Hopping — Tips: — Pellet hops give a more

    assertive hop character — If using whole hops, chop/blend them! — Multiple dry hop additions are good for IPA’s and DIPA’s (i.e. add some more after a couple of days) — Dry hopping on yeasty beer helps reduce astringency, yeast absorbs some harshness London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  24. Dry Hopping — Other factors to consider... — Temperature -

    16-20 °C — Agitate / Circulate? — Bag or no bag? London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  25. Dry Hopping - How much is too much? — 1.050-1.060

    => 4-4.5 g/l — 1.060-1.065 => 5-5.5 g/l — 1.065-1.070 => 6.6.5 g/l — 1.070-1.075 => 9 g/l — 1.075-1.080 => 10 g/l — 1.080-1.085 => 12 g/l http://www.port66.co.uk/dry-hopping/ London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  26. Dry Hopping — http://abeeronthedowns.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/dry- hopping-for-homebrewers.html — http://www.port66.co.uk/dry-hopping/ — https://byo.com/hops/item/569-dry-hopping- techniques

    — http://beersmith.com/blog/2008/05/21/dry-hopping- enhanced-hops-aroma/ London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  27. Hop Stand / Whirlpool — Simply allow the boiled wort

    an extended contact period with flameout hops prior to chilling the wort — An actual whirlpool is not required, but it can help! — Why? — Extraction of hop oils (aroma/flavour) into the wort that would be lost at higher temperatures London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  28. Hop Stand / Whirlpool — How? — Three popular temperature

    profiles (°C): — 71-77 or 88-100 - Humulene, Caryophellene, Farnesene — 60-66 - the above plus Myrcene — Length: 10 to 90 minutes, overnight even! London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  29. Hop Stand / Whirlpool — http://byo.com/aging/item/2808-hop-stands — http://www.port66.co.uk/hop-standing/ London Amateur

    Brewers, July 2015
  30. First-Wort Hopping — Adding hops to the boiler at the

    very beginning of the sparging process, as soon as you have finished recirculating the first runnings http://beersmith.com/blog/2008/03/17/the-first-wort-hop-beer-brewing-techniques/ London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  31. First-Wort Hopping — Why? — Produce complex bitterness and aroma

    that is both smooth and pleasing to the pallet — Increase utilisation (IBU yield) by as much as 10% http://beersmith.com/blog/2008/03/17/the-first-wort-hop-beer-brewing-techniques/ London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  32. Hopping Tools London Amateur Brewers, July 2015

  33. Hop Infusers — A.K.A. Hop Back / Rocket / Torpedo

    — A device inserted in-line as beer is transferred and cooled from the boiler into the fermenter London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  34. Hop Infusers — Why? — Maximise surface contact between hot

    wort and hops and transfer hop oils (aroma) not bitterness into wort London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  35. London Amateur Brewers, July 2015

  36. London Amateur Brewers, July 2015

  37. Randalizers — A.K.A. The Brewdog “Hopinator” — Basically, a hop

    infuser used in-line within a keg dispense system London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  38. Randalizers — Why? — Inject fresh hop oils (aroma) into

    your beer as it’s served — You can also infuse beer with other things - i.e. fruit peel or herbs and spices London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  39. Hop Extracts — A.K.A. “Hop Shots” — CO2 extraction of

    all the essential bittering and aroma components, none of the leafy plant matter. — Why? — Increased hop utilisation — No vegetal matter — Increased kettle yield London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  40. New and Upcoming Hop Varieties London Amateur Brewers, July 2015

  41. General Trends — Tropical Fruit Flavours — High Oil Content

    (not necessarily AA%) London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  42. Germany — Mandarina Bavaria — Distinct tangerine and citrus flavours

    — Hallertau Blanc — Floral and fruity with passion fruit, grapefruit, pineapple, grape and lemongrass overtones London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  43. Czech Republic — Kazbek — An offspring of Saaz, Kazbek

    packs a much bigger punch. Expect more spiciness and more earth in your Pilsner or Saison London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  44. Australia — Enigma — ‘Pinot Gris’, raspberries, and redcurrant, through

    to light tropical fruit — Vic Secret — Pineapple, pine, passionfruit - lighter than Galaxy London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  45. Australia — Ella — Spicy, hoppy and floral with hints

    of anise London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  46. New Zeland — Rakau — Peach and passionfruit — Kohatu

    — Floral, pine needles, tropical fruit - more subtle than most NZ hops — Wai-iti — Fruitier than Kohatu with a big passionfruit note London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  47. USA — TriplePerle — Notes of melon, orange citrus, resin,

    spice, pepper — Cashmere — Mild herbal aroma with strong melon, lemon, lime and slightly spicy notes London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  48. USA — Sterling — Herbal and spicy, with a hint

    of floral, citrus (lemon/ pineapple) characteristics — Azacca — Aromas of tropical fruits and citrus. Tasting notes of spicy mango, pineapple, tangerine and pine London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  49. USA — Jarrylo — Banana, pear, spice aroma translates perfectly

    to Pale Ales, Saisons and Belgians — Pekko — Complex and clean characteristics of floral, citrus, and mint lend itself to many different styles of beer London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  50. USA — Palisade — Apricot, grass and clean floral characteristics

    — Equinox — Lemon, lime, papaya, apple, and green pepper London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  51. UK London Amateur Brewers, July 2015

  52. Jester An intense, punchy aroma of new world proportions, with

    flavour notes of Grapefruit and tropical fruits London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  53. Archer Floral with delicate hints of lime and peach London

    Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  54. Olicana Tropical fruit flavours and aromas, including Mango, grapefruit, and

    passionfruit London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  55. Endeavour Complex blackcurrant, loganberry and spice notes, with a grapefruit

    and lime flavour London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  56. Minstrel Spiced berries with orange citrus London Amateur Brewers, July

    2015
  57. Credits — Will Rogers / Charles Faram — Alison Capper

    / Stocks Farm (@BritishHops) — Nathan Smith (@nathanhomebrew) — The Brewing Network — The Beersmith Podcast — THE INTERNET — LAB London Amateur Brewers, July 2015
  58. Cheers! London Amateur Brewers, July 2015