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Five reasons why you should measure the clipping volume

Five reasons why you should measure the clipping volume

Everyone checks the growth of the grass by counting basket empties or other more subjective evaluations of how rapidly the grass is growing. Measuring the volume of clippings mown from an area, and then reporting it as volume per area, is an exciting measurement that represents directly the overall objective of turfgrass management -- modifying the growth rate of the grass to create the desired playing surface.

I shared data and case studies from around the world to explain how this measurement works and why the simple measurement of clipping volume has so many exciting implications for golf course maintenance. These include improved management (or optimization) of surface consistency, green speed, topdressing, and more.

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Micah Woods

April 23, 2018
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Transcript

  1. Five reasons why you should measure the clipping volume Micah

    Woods April 23, 2018 Chief Scientist Asian Turfgrass Center www.asianturfgrass.com @asianturfgrass
  2. #ClipVol

  3. #ClipVol data from these locations

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  5. Five reasons why 1. Growth rate

  6. Five reasons why 1. Growth rate 2. Green speed

  7. Five reasons why 1. Growth rate 2. Green speed 3.

    Nutrient use and supply
  8. Five reasons why 1. Growth rate 2. Green speed 3.

    Nutrient use and supply 4. Consistency
  9. Five reasons why 1. Growth rate 2. Green speed 3.

    Nutrient use and supply 4. Consistency 5. Topdressing
  10. 1. Growth rate

  11. Old Course, St. Andrews

  12. Old Course, St. Andrews

  13. Kashima Soccer Stadium, Japan

  14. Kashima Soccer Stadium, Japan

  15. Royal Bangkok Sports Club

  16. Siam CC Plantation Course, Thailand

  17. Let’s apply clipping volume

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  19. photo courtesy of Evan Mascitti

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  21. “I thought the grass performed and looked the best when

    clipping yield was between [30 to 40 mL/m2]” Evan Mascitti
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  25. 2. Green speed

  26. greenkeeper Andrew McDaniel (@drumcturf) at Keya GC, Japan

  27. Keya GC, Japan

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  34. Keya GC, Japan

  35. Keya GC, Japan

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  38. Victoria GC, Canada

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  43. Eric Reasor project, photo at Koshigaya GC, Saitama, Japan

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  45. 3. Nutrient use and supply

  46. Nichino Ryokka research center at Chiba, Japan

  47. Chiba, Japan

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  49. For bentgrass, with every 10 mL/m2, expect a dry matter

    harvest of 0.6 g/m2. Or, for every 83 mL/m2, expect a dry matter harvest of 1 lb/1000 ft2.
  50. Then resupply as desired For example, 83 mL/m2 of bentgrass

    ≈ 0.04 lbs N/1000 ft2. And 0.02 lbs K/1000 ft2. And so on.
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  52. 4. Consistency

  53. Augusta National GC, USA

  54. Keya GC, Japan

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  59. 5. Topdressing

  60. Tifeagle, Thailand

  61. “41% of members and players complain that sanded greens play

    poorly, according to turf managers who participated in recent GCI research.” GCI Magazine—April 2018
  62. Kanto region, Japan

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  67. Table 1: Annual clipping volume at that location from 2013

    to 2016 Year Volume Estimated dry weight N applied L/m2 g/m2 lb/1000 ft2 2013 4.4 266 NA 2014 3.4 201 2.6 2015 2.9 172 2 2016 2.4 142 1.7
  68. 1. Growth rate 2. Green speed 3. Nutrient use and

    supply 4. Consistency 5. Topdressing
  69. For more, please see www.asianturfgrass.com or @asianturfgrass on Twitter.