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7.Principles.forAnyAgileTeam.workshop_Agile2019_-_Johanna_and_Mark.pdf

Mark Kilby
August 05, 2019

 7.Principles.forAnyAgileTeam.workshop_Agile2019_-_Johanna_and_Mark.pdf

In this talk, Johanna Rothman and I covered 7 of the 8 principles from our book, From Chaos to Success Distributed Agile Teams: Collaborate to Deliver. These 7 principles work equally well for distributed or collocated teams and we provided many examples in our talk. A handout is available on my website at https://www.markkilby.com/resources/book-talks/

Mark Kilby

August 05, 2019
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  1. Seven Principles for Any Effective
    Agile Team, Collocated or Distributed:
    A Workshop
    Johanna Rothman Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman @mkilby
    www.jrothman.com www.markkilby.com

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  2. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Problems with Agile Teams
    • “Agile” teams aren’t agile and they aren’t teams
    • Many teams don’t practice transparency
    • Many teams don’t establish a project rhythm
    • Many teams don’t reflect on a rhythm
    • Lock in a process instead of experiment
    • Many teams work as “silos of one” instead of collaborating
    • Many teams share on a “need to know basis” and no one needs to know.
    • People are quick to point a finger when things go wrong instead of learning from the situation.
    • Teams don’t persevere when they don’t have access to the right information or people.
    2

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  3. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Distributed Agile Teams Require Sufficient Hours of
    Overlap
    • Not this workshop. Teams need to create their hours of overlap
    • Ask team members to see how they can work for the
    betterment of the team
    3
    Original hours of overlap New, agreed-upon hours of overlap
    Hear more in Mark’s talk on Tue
    Aug 6 - Facilitating Distributed
    Teams
    or
    read about it at https://
    www.jrothman.com/
    distworkspace

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  4. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Agile Teams
    • Have all the skills and
    capabilities they need to
    complete the work
    • One team goal
    • Affiliate with each other
    • Interdependent work
    4

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  5. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    7 Principles for Any Agile Team
    1. Principle: Create transparency at all levels.
    2. Principle: Create a culture of continuous improvement with experiments.
    3. Principle: Practice pervasive communication at all levels.
    4. Principle: Create a project rhythm.
    5. Principle: Assume good intention.
    6. Principle: Create resilience with a holistic culture.
    7. Principle: Default to collaborative work, not solo work.

    5

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  6. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Organize Yourselves for the Workshop
    • Consider working in teams of three people (two is okay, four might be too many)
    • If you’re here with other people from your org, consider working with them.
    • We’ll work in 8-minute timeboxes
    • 1-2 minutes to explain principle
    • You get 5 min to answer questions to see how your teams measure up.
    (probably more than you have time for)
    • We’ll debrief quickly
    6

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  7. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    1. Create Transparency at All Levels
    • Agile teams need to see everything for the team: all the WIP, all the backlogs, roadmaps, issues, everything
    • Does your team have a shared workspace (not just a board)?
    • If your org has multiple teams especially working on the same product, can your team see your team’s
    boards, roadmaps?
    • What kind of corporate transparency does your work require?
    7

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  8. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Activity 1: Create Transparency at All Levels
    8
    • Locate your team on the continuum
    • Where does your team need to be? Make a list of what your team needs to see and when they
    need to see it.
    • What would you have to do to make that list available to the team?

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  9. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    2. Create a Culture of Continuous Improvement with
    Experiments
    9
    • Agile approaches need experimentation (inspect-and-adapt)
    • Every team needs to experiment even if they’re doing “fantastic”
    • Try is not an experiment

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  10. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    What Experiments Look Like
    1. What is the reason you want to experiment?
    You might need to learn something, you
    might have a problem.
    2. Create a hypothesis. Based on experience,
    you think you have a problem “here”
    3. Test the hypothesis with an experiment.
    Create measurements in advance.
    4. Timebox the experiment.
    5. Measure the results.
    6. Check your hypothesis.
    10

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  11. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Activity 2: Create a Culture of Continuous
    Improvement with Experiments
    11
    • Locate your team on the continuum
    • What areas do you want to consider for experiments?
    • Do you have hypotheses? Write them down and discuss with the colleagues you’ve selected.
    • Make a list of these possible experiments

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  12. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    3. Practice Pervasive Communication at All Levels
    12
    • Asynchronous communications are insufficient for agile teams
    • The more async comms you have, the more you have to “overcommunicate”
    • Even sync communications might require more-than-once messages

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  13. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Communication Possibilities
    • Rich: full duplex, synchronous
    • Asynchronous communication is
    not rich
    • Natural: see each other’s faces and
    bodies to see social cues
    • Team backchannel: offers another
    channel when the team works
    together
    13

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  14. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Activity 3: Practice Pervasive Communication at All
    Levels
    14
    • Locate your team on the continuum
    • How do the team members choose to communicate? (How often do they use video?)
    • Does every member have the ability to use all channels? (Includes PO)
    • How do your managers communicate with the team(s) now?
    • Make a list of communication challenges you’d like to address

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  15. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    4. Create a Project Rhythm
    15
    • You might think you’re using a timebox (sprint/iteration). Here’s a check:
    • The team always finishes (almost always) everything at the end of the timebox.
    • Nothing “rolls over” from iteration to iteration
    • The PO is able to change the next iteration’s contents based on the finishing from this iteration.

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  16. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Two Main Agile Approaches
    16
    Requirements
    Analysis
    Design
    Build
    Test
    Release
    Deploy
    Requirements
    Analysis
    Design
    Build
    Test
    Release
    Deploy
    Repeat as
    needed
    ...
    Requirements
    Analysis
    Design
    Build
    Test
    Release
    Deploy
    Requirements
    Analysis
    Design
    Build
    Test
    Release
    Deploy
    Requirements
    Analysis
    Design
    Build
    Test
    Release
    Deploy
    Requirements
    Analysis
    Design
    Build
    Test
    Release
    Deploy
    Each timebox is the same size. Each timebox results in running tested features.
    Iteration-Based Agile
    Feature:
    Clarify
    Requirement,
    Analysis
    Design
    Build
    Test
    Release
    Deploy
    Feature:
    Clarify Requirement,
    Analysis
    Design
    Build
    Test
    Release
    Deploy
    Repeat as
    needed
    ...
    Feature:
    Clarify
    Requirement,
    Analysis
    Design
    Build
    Test
    Release
    Deploy
    Feature:
    Clarify
    Requirement,
    Analysis
    Design
    Build
    Test
    Release
    Deploy
    Feature:
    Clarify
    Req't,
    Analysis
    Design
    Build
    Test
    Release
    Deploy
    Flow-Based Agile
    In flow, the team limits the number of features active at any time with WIP limits for each team activity.
    There is no timeboxing built into flow.

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  17. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Commonalities Between Iterations and Flow
    • Limit WIP (Work in Progress)
    • Timeboxes limit scope
    • Flow limits team’s WIP
    • Based on collaboration
    • Focused on throughput
    • Result in running, tested features
    17

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  18. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Activity 4: Create a Project Rhythm
    18
    • Locate your team on the continuum
    • Does the team always maintain a cadence of demos and retros? If not, what would be a better
    cadence?
    • If you could choose an approach on this continuum, what would it be?
    • Make a list of anything you might want to change

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  19. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    5. Assume Good Intention
    • Especially with asynchronous communications, it’s easy to miss intention
    • Neither blaming or placating is helpful
    19

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  20. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Congruence Helps
    • When we take the other person, ourselves,
    and the context into account, we are
    congruent.
    • Blaming: forget about the other
    • Placating: forget about self
    • Super-reasonable: only about the context;
    forget about the people involved
    • Note: Just because we are technical does not
    mean we don’t have emotions. We do. We
    don’t always go to super-reasonable. Many of
    us go directly to blame. (Sigh)
    20

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  21. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Activity 5: Assume Good Intention
    • Place each team member on the continuum as you experience them.
    • What could you do as a leader to help people move more to the center?
    • In-person meeting, open space, retro, you might have other ideas
    • Make your list of possibilities
    21

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  22. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    6. Create Resilience with a Holistic Culture
    • Resilience: ability to recover to move towards a change
    • You need to change your board and the team can agree on the changes.
    • Someone else needs to initiate the meeting and they have the ability to do so.
    • Both are easier if we understand each other’s context
    22

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  23. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Activity 6: Create Resilience with a Holistic Culture
    • Locate your team on the continuum
    • Where would you like to be?
    • How does resilience play into your team’s ability to experiment?
    • List three possibilities for increasing your team’s resilience
    23

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  24. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    7. Default to Collaborative Work
    • Agile teams do not “assign” work to individuals (no micro-silos)
    • When teams focus on the same problem, they can create better flow and deliver
    value faster
    • If you are part of a distributed team, and you have sufficient audio and video tooling,
    you can collaborate
    24

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  25. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Collaboration Definitions
    • Pairing: two people (of any variety) work
    together. One (virtual) keyboard, WIP=1
    • Swarming: team working together. WIP=1
    • Little planning, separate to do own work,
    check in on frequent basis (60 mins)
    • When done with own work, available to
    support/help others
    • Mobbing: entire team work together. One
    (virtual) keyboard, WIP=1
    25

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  26. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Activity 7: Default to Collaborative Work
    • Locate your team on the continuum
    • Where would you like your team to be?
    • Make a list of ways your team could collaborate
    26

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  27. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Activity (Last!): Make One Smaller List
    • You each have several possibilities for each of the principles. That’s too much to
    manage.
    • Find and circle ONLY 3 items on your worksheet that you are likely to try in the
    next month
    • We’ll timebox you and we’ll debrief together.
    27

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  28. © 2019 Johanna Rothman and Mark Kilby
    @johannarothman / @mkilby
    Let’s Stay in Touch
    Johanna:
    • Pragmatic Manager: www.jrothman.com/
    pragmaticmanager
    • Please link with me on LinkedIn


    Mark:
    • http://markkilby.com 

    (for articles, newsletter and blog)
    • Twitter: @mkilby
    • http://www.linkedin.com/in/mkilby
    28
    Mark
    presenting tomorrow:
    “Facilitating Distributed Teams”
    3:45 pm
    Chesapeake 10/11/12
    Johanna
    presenting tomorrow:
    “Build Your 

    Modern Management Mindset”
    2 pm
    National Harbor 12/13

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