Notre Dame Media Legends 2015

Notre Dame Media Legends 2015

835315fc6e4a2b316f333406acfbd3d4?s=128

Notre Dame News

November 30, 2015
Tweet

Transcript

  1. 2015 Media Legends Reception

  2. Expert: Pope addresses Congress as "pastoral leader," not "politician" “He

    is a pastoral leader... he is not trying to be a politician," University of Notre Dame President Rev. John Jenkins told "CBS This Morning" Thursday. He also acknowledged that while the pontiff is "clear about his views," they "come from a place of a kind of moral and spiritual message."
  3. Nelson Mark Alfred C. DeCrane Jr. Professor of International Economics,

    Director of Graduate Studies “Now they’re saying, ‘Gee, no one is going to take care of me when I get old,’ so they’re funding their own retirement.”
  4. Ann Tenbrunsel, study co-author and a professor of business ethics

    at Notre Dame, said that "Despite significant energy and efforts, it appears we need to continue to think about how to improve the culture of ethics in the financial services industry and most likely, in other sectors as well." Ann Tenbrunsel David E. Gallo Professor of Business Ethics
  5. “This is something that has a really big impact in

    the lives of American Catholics,” explains Candida Moss, professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame.
  6. University of Notre Dame Chief Investment Officer Scott Malpass and

    Bloomberg’s Lauren Streib examine the strides made by smaller and state schools in endowment investing performance compared to historically high returns at Ivy League schools.
  7. None
  8. Abusive bosses have a range of reasons to beat up

    on employees, said Charlice Hurst, an assistant professor at the University of Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business and co-author of a recent study that explores the dynamics of bullying in the workplace. Charlice Hurst Assistant Professor, Mendoza College of Business
  9. None
  10. Pope's trip comes as U.S. churches fight to survive "It

    is very disheartening to see parish closures," said Kathleen Sprows Cummings, director of the University of Notre Dame's Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism, who notes many of the ones targeted for closure were formed by European immigrant communities in the 19th and early 20th century in places like New York and Philadelphia that have since moved on. Kathleen Sprows Cummings Director, Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism, Associate Professor of American Studies
  11. In The Paradox of Generosity, the Notre Dame sociologist Christian

    Smith and his student Hilary Davidson argue alongside Jesus and Muhammad and Ecclesiastes that through giving we receive. "Help your brother’s boat across," they quote a Hindu proverb, "and your own will reach the shore." Christian Smith Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center for the Study of Religion and Society
  12. Media outlets have been abuzz with the news that the

    oldest fragment of a New Testament gospel -- and thus the earliest witness of Jesus' life and ministry -- had been discovered hidden inside an Egyptian mummy mask and was going to be published. Candida Moss Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity Biblical Studies/Christianity and Judaism in Antiquity History of Christianity
  13. Antioxidants May Make Cancer Worse But scientists now think that

    antioxidants, at high enough levels, also protect cancer cells from these same free radicals. “There now exists a sizable quantity of data suggesting that antioxidants can help cancer cells much like they help normal cells,” says Zachary Schafer, a biologist at the University of Notre Dame, who was not involved in the new study. Last year the scientists behind the melanoma study found that antioxidants fuel the growth of another type of malignancy, lung cancer. Zach Schafer Coleman Foundation Associate Professor of Cancer Biology
  14. None
  15. Many students engage in premeditated cheating, and "if you can’t

    sit next to the people you planned to," random seating "would break up that kind of premeditation,“ Ms. Blum says. Susan D. Blum Professor of Anthropology
  16. Maurizio Albahari says officials at smaller ports in Turkey, Egypt

    and Albania sometimes turn a blind eye to the human trafficking, which can be disguised by bringing migrants on board in small batches. Maurizio Albahari Assistant Professor of Anthropology
  17. Pope Francis in America

  18. “Memory problems, issues with decision-making, lack of creativity and regulating

    personal emotions are some of the first areas to be diminished by lack of sleep,” according to Payne. Jessica Payne Associate Professor, Nancy O'Neill Collegiate Chair in Psychology
  19. Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C. President 'No justification whatsoever‘ for

    homelessness, pope says in Washington The visit was likely intended to underline his remarks to Congress, said Rev. John Jenkins, president of the University of Notre Dame, a Catholic university. "The wonderful thing about this pope is he does it in words, but even more powerfully, he does it in gestures," Jenkins said.
  20. “If there is going to be any change for an

    organization that has been dogged for years by claims of bribery and other corruption -- including over the decisions to award the World Cup to Russia in 2018 and Qatar in 2022 -- it will need to be externally driven. And the nature of those reforms may well lead to FIFA's demise.” Richard Sheehan Professor of Finance
  21. "The bank has gone from the shadows to the realm

    of mainstream banking," said Martijn Cremers, professor of finance at the University of Notre Dame. "They ended the anonymous numbered accounts, and they instituted 'know your customer' rules." Martijn Cremers Professor of Finance
  22. Iran's nuclear pact: Deal of the century? “The Iran nuclear

    deal is a good one for all concerned. This should come as welcome news because it is the only game in town for reasons critics may fail to mention…” Mary Ellen O’Connell Robert and Marion Short Professor of Law and Research Professor of International Dispute Resolution
  23. “It now appears that the Chinese financial system has not

    developed as quickly as needed. The system continues to be dominated by state-controlled banks who funnel lending to large state- owned enterprises.” Timothy Fuerst William and Dorothy O'Neill Professor of Economics and Director of Graduate Studies
  24. Pope Francis’ address to US bishops could be consequential Catholic

    bishops in the United States deserves lots of praise on some issues, such as immigration, and it’s likely Francis will highlight that, said Kathleen Sprows Cummings, director of the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism at the University of Notre Dame. “He’s not going to be scolding the bishops at all, but he’s going to be challenging them, as he is going to be challenging all Americans, to live up to our ideals,” she said. Kathleen Sprows Cummings Director, Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism, Associate Professor of American Studies
  25. “So, in these two instances, there are winners and losers.

    But this fifth loss by Roger Goodell is the most stunning of all and, unlike the fantasy leagues, comes in the real world affairs of a league with a seriously wounded leader.” Ed Edmonds Associate Dean for Library and Information Technology and Professor of Law
  26. “What should be considered is the responsibility of proliferating countries

    to ensure that they have done all in their power to keep the weapons they sell from being turned on innocent people.” Maj. Gen. Robert Latiff (Ret.) Adjunct Professor, Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values
  27. “Five years after disaster struck, much remains to be done.

    But by working with the local community, a growing global economy and the steadfast spirit of the Haitian people offer hope that this island will one day offer a recovery success story that will be remembered in the history books.” Rev. Thomas G. Streit, C.S.C. Associate Professor of the Practice, Biological Sciences
  28. “These two themes – the beauty of our natural landscapes

    and our thankfulness to God for them – are too often overlooked in our current, polarized environmental debates.” John Copeland Nagle John N. Matthews Professor of Law
  29. What you think makes a good leader probably doesn't “In

    what's probably the best quantitative study of this dimension, the psychologist Tim Judge found that disagreeable people—those who are more likely to be self-centered, confrontational, and antisocial—have a higher probability of becoming leaders. More agreeable people—who are empathetic, altruistic, and sociable—tend to make better leaders, but are less frequently chosen to lead.” Timothy Judge Franklin D. Schurz Professor of Management and Department Chair
  30. It's time to defund Planned Parenthood “The American people should

    be thankful for Dr. Nucatola’s and Gatter’s words, and even for the coarse and graphic manner in which they were delivered. In doing so, they offered a rare glimpse of the horrible truth about the nature and human cost of Planned Parenthood’s work.” O. Carter Snead William P. and Hazel B. White Director of the Center for Ethics and Culture and Professor of Law
  31. Notre Dame President Stands Firm Amid Shifts in College Athletics

    Father Jenkins, a passionate defender of his alma mater, has considered the arguments. He agrees that the N.C.A.A. is struggling to find its role on a changed playing field. And, in what may come as a surprise, he suggests that student-athletes should be able to monetize their fame, with limits. But he adamantly opposes a model in which college sheds what is left of its amateur ways for a semiprofessional structure — one in which universities pay their athletes. “Our relationship to these young people is to educate them, to help them grow,” he says. “Not to be their agent for financial gain.”
  32. Quasar backlighting gives weight to Andromeda galaxy Quasars, the brilliant

    cores of distant active galaxies, shine out through a “fog” of material closer in, so can serve to probe the contents of nearby galaxies. But finding more than a few quasars behind each galaxy isn’t easy. Now Nicolas Lehner of the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, and his colleagues have used a record 18 quasars to study our nearest large galaxy: Andromeda, or M31. Nicolas Lehner Research Associate Professor of Astrophysics
  33. The politicization of our Supreme Court Richard W. Garnett Paul

    J. Schierl/Fort Howard Corporation Professor of Law, Concurrent Professor of Political Science “And so, as the Court’s term, and the presidential campaign, unfold, watch for Democratic candidates to warn about the importance of replacing any retiring justices with reliable liberals and for some Republican candidates to complain that some justices have not been reliably conservative enough.”
  34. The face of our church is changing “More than 30%

    of U.S. parishes are shared between at least two ethnic or racial groups, with English and Spanish as the two most common languages,” University of Notre Dame theology professor Timothy Matovina writes in his 2012 book "Latino Catholicism: Transformation in America's Largest Church." Timothy Matovina Professor of Theology and Co-Director of the Institute for Latino Studies
  35. Faith and science can find common ground In his recent

    encyclical on humans and the environment, Pope Francis described environmental degradation with great scientific accuracy, and he linked it to economic exploitation and the plight of the poor. This is a challenge to many conservative Protestants who believe that humans, because they are made in God’s image, have a divine right to exploit the natural world. David Lodge Professor of Biological Sciences
  36. Syria: Why we should let Putin put his hand in

    the hornet's nest “But whatever his motives, Putin has the most realistic understanding of the way forward in Syria: Syrian president Bashir al-Assad has to be part of the solution.” Michael Desch Professor of Political Science and Co-Director of the Notre Dame International Security Program
  37. The Remarkable Power of Simply Telling the Truth “Dr. Anita

    Kelly of Notre Dame has done an interesting ‘science of honesty’ study recently. She tested 110 subjects, half of whom were told to stop telling lies for ten weeks and half of whom were given no special advisement about lying …” Anita Kelly Professor of Psychology
  38. “The deal isn’t perfect, but it is very good. It

    achieves the priority goal of U.S. and international policy of reducing and placing tight controls on Iran’s nuclear capability.” David Cortright Director of Policy Studies at Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies
  39. Antibiotic Resistance: Why Aren’t Drug Companies Developing New Medicines To

    Stop Superbugs? “Companies are very much interested in disease that can be managed -- chronic ailments like high blood pressure ... after a certain age, you would use their product till the end of your life.” Shahriar Mobashery Navari Family Professor in Life Sciences
  40. Pipeline rupture a warning of spills to come? “Most accidents

    are avoidable, but avoiding them requires vigilance. One hopes that disaster is not the only catalyst for change: our awareness today of the deficiencies in our onshore oil transport system must lead to action now, before another devastating spill.” Bruce Huber Associate Professor of Law
  41. U.S. Federal Jury Finds PA And PLO Liable For Israel

    Attacks A federal jury has found the Palestinian Authority and the Palestine Liberation Organization liable for attacks that occurred in Israel more than a decade ago. The plaintiffs, who are U.S. citizens, were awarded more than $218 million. The amount could be tripled under the U.S. Anti-Terrorism Act. Jimmy Gurulé Professor of Law
  42. The Cure for Incivility University of Notre Dame President and

    member of the Commission on Presidential Debates, the Reverend John Jenkins talks about moral education and the cure for incivility in an age of entrenched partisanship.
  43. Timothy Judge Franklin D. Schurz Professor of Management and Department

    Chair Why the Perfect Manager Is Mature, Stable, and Boring He cites research by Tim Judge, a management professor at Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business, which finds effective managers "tend to be highly adjusted, sociable, friendly, flexible, and prudent."
  44. Notre Dame dean bikes to battle a fatal disease Greg

    Crawford's right wrist is covered with a half-dozen multicolored plastic bracelets. "Race for Adam," reads one, for a teen in Bethlehem, Pa. "Dillon's Army," reads another, in honor of a Maryland boy. "Fight for Jessica," reads a third, for a girl in Los Angeles. "I told them I'd never take them off until we have a cure," Crawford, 50, said. Greg Crawford Associate Provost, University Vice President
  45. None
  46. “Each and every one of our nation’s Catholic schools, especially

    those serving the poor and the marginalized, represents a critically important bridge for students and their families. These schools are bridges from poverty to opportunity, from isolation to community, from the daily grind to the hope of eternal life.” Rev. Timothy Scully Founder, Alliance for Catholic Education and Hackett Family Director of the Institute for Educational Initiatives
  47. Cheating All Around “But when it all boils down to

    a few numbers, and the numbers can, carefully, surreptitiously, and illegally, be changed, it should not surprise us that the temptation to do so becomes irresistible, in some cases.” Susan D. Blum Professor of Anthropology
  48. Confusion over Confucius? Zimbabwe's Mugabe wins Chinese peace prize “Confucius

    ... is a symbol of honesty, forbearance, respect, and humane wisdom,” says Lionel Jensen, an associate professor of language and culture at Notre Dame. “To confer an award in this name to Mugabe, is to dishonor and profane his memory … and [shows] appalling disregard of China's cultural heritage.” Lionel Jensen Associate Professor of History and East Asian Languages and Cultures
  49. Do antioxidants promote health — or fuel cancer? Naturally, things

    are more complicated. Free radicals attack all kinds of cells — including cancer cells, said cancer biologist Zachary Schafer of the University of Notre Dame. So if antioxidants mop up free radicals, “that might help cancer cells,” he said, allowing them to proliferate and spread more easily. His research, using mice, has shown exactly that. Zach Schafer Coleman Foundation Associate Professor of Cancer Biology
  50. The Synod Could Be The Defining Moment Of Francis' Papacy

    "They are discussing issues that go to the heart of what it means to be a Catholic living in a particular culture," says Kathleen Sprows Cummings, head of the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism at the University of Notre Dame. She spoke with NPR's Michel Martin about the synod, in the first installment of a new series, Words You'll Hear. Kathleen Sprows Cummings Director, Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism, Associate Professor of American Studies
  51. "The U.S. has been reluctant to share classified information with

    Mexican law enforcement authorities for concern that the information will be shared with drug traffickers, and Mexico has come a long way in trying to allay those fears." Jimmy Gurulé Professor of Law Could ‘El Chapo’s’ Escape Damage U.S.-Mexico Relations?
  52. Retailers Use Time To Their Advantage; More Impulse Products Sold

    “Well, it turns out consumers make more impulsive purchases the longer they spend in a store. This is research by Timothy Gilbride, Jeffrey Inman and Karen Melville Stilley.” Timothy Gilbride Associate Professor of Marketing
  53. John Cavadini Professor of Theology, Director of the Institute for

    Church Life Pope Francis ‘Abortion Pardons’: In Year Of Mercy, A Strategic Move To Win Back Lapsed Catholics “The change is pastoral, not doctrinal. It’s intended to emphasize the church as an agent of mercy rather than an agent of condemnation.”
  54. FIFA Corruption Scandal: How Sepp Blatter Runs Soccer 'Like a

    Chicago Politician' "Think about the NCAA with football," Sheehan said. "If you put a vote to all institutions in total, you have a lot more votes, and you're going to have decisions which are largely going to be in the interests of the smaller schools.” Richard Sheehan Professor of Finance
  55. Candida Moss Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity Room

    in Catholic School for Gay-Straight Alliance “Pope Francis’s language is of inclusivity,” said Candida Moss, a professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame. “Previously, the argument against a Gay-Straight Alliance at a Catholic high school or college would have been that we don’t want to endorse non-Catholic lifestyles. But with this pope, a G.S.A. can be seen not as an endorsement of a lifestyle but as a support group, as a way of having people be in community.”
  56. The NYSE has changed dramatically in just the past 10

    years, and it's likely to keep changing, says Robert Battalio, professor of finance at Notre Dame. “At least for my generation, it symbolizes capitalism and all, right? But I think, you know, in 20, 30 years, it's not going to have the same meaning.” Robert Battalio Professor of Finance
  57. Michael Desch Professor of Political Science and Co-Director of the

    Notre Dame International Security Program The Quiet American “Only one of the 12 defense secretaries under whom Mr. Marshall served makes more than a perfunctory reference to him in his memoirs,” notes Michael Desch.
  58. Hubble Scientists Map a Massive Halo of Gas Around Andromeda

    Galaxy "As the light from the quasars travels toward Hubble, the halo's gas will absorb some of that light and make the quasar appear a little darker in just a very small wavelength range," Notre Dame astronomer J. Christopher Howk explained. Left: Nicolas Lehner Research Associate Professor, Astrophysics Right: Jay Christopher Howk Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Astrophysics
  59. Gianna Bern Associate Teaching Professor of Finance and Academic Director,

    Master of Science in Finance Iran’s return as a dominant power in the international marketplace is “not going to be immediate,” said Gianna Bern, an energy consultant who teaches international finance at the University of Notre Dame.
  60. None
  61. For Latinos, 1965 Voting Rights Act Impact Came A Decade

    Later “This law in 1975 was an absolutely critical contributor to all the success and growth we've seen in Latino political empowerment." Luis Fraga The Arthur Foundation Endowed Professor of Transformative Latino Leadership Professor of Political Science
  62. Celia Deane-Drummond Professor of Theology Four Themes To Expect From

    Pope Francis' Climate Change Encyclical “He’s going to follow on the idea of human ecology that Pope John Paul II talked about: the intersection between human lives and the social world with the environment,” said Celia Deane-Drummond, a professor of theology who specializes in environmental ethics at the University of Notre Dame.
  63. Big Picture Science Radio NSF-funded astronomer Tim Beers discusses the

    earliest stars and their role in creating the chemistry of the very early universe. Tim Beers Professor of Astrophysics
  64. Pope-Admiring Latino Youth Are the Catholic Church's Present, Future "Latino

    Catholics are growing in number, we all know that. But, most leadership positions in American Catholicism are not held by Latinos and sometimes the ministries are temporary," or are seen as an ethnic program to be operated until Latinos become mainstream. Timothy Matovina Professor of Theology, Co-Director of the Institute for Latino Studies
  65. Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C. President Hillary Clinton Reaching Out

    to Catholics In what could signal a coming pitch for the Catholic vote, Hillary Rodham Clinton met last week with Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan, the archbishop of New York, and on Monday she sat near the Rev. John I. Jenkins, president of the University of Notre Dame, at a St. Patrick’s Day-themed luncheon.
  66. After Historic Colombia Peace Agreement, Optimism and Concern "The agreement

    respects the rights of victims to truth, reparations, non- repetition and measures of justice. Most important, if the agreements are honored, there will be no future victims." Douglass Cassel Notre Dame Presidential Fellow, Professor of Law
  67. Hunt for the First Stars "The good news is that

    second-generation stars are all around us. Some of the best examples we have are just a few hundred light years from us," says Timothy Beers, the provost's chair of astrophysics at Notre Dame. "They're really not that far away, and it tends to surprise people that we can understand the distant past by looking so close to home." Tim Beers Professor of Astrophysics
  68. Tense Scene on Basketball Court 50 Years Ago Recalls Catholic

    Role in Civil Rights “There’s an interesting kind of irony that the very hierarchical and global nature of the church means that the Vatican is more liberal on race than the American bishops.” John McGreevy I.A. O'Shaughnessy Dean of the College of Arts and Letters, Professor of History
  69. Ebrahim Moosa Professor of Islamic Studies My madrassa classmate hated

    politics. Then he joined the Islamic State. “The Islamic State outlook does not threaten only groups like the Yazidis, Jews, Christians and Shiites. It poses an even greater threat to Islam. As long as mainstream Muslim authorities keep Islamic learning in formaldehyde, they make it easier for many more like Rashid to head for the violent apocalyptic theaters of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.”
  70. Seamus Heaney Work Wins Contest Honoring Ireland’s Poets and Its

    Past “Bards were the Mad Men of their day — they were the Madison Avenue spin doctors and makers of political fables for their leaders.” Declan Kiberd Professor of Irish Studies
  71. Vatican Working Toward Formal Ties With China Despite Rhetorical Disagreements

    “The comment made by Pope Francis has to be taken in context about Xi Jinping’s official explanation about how religion will be treated in China ...” Lionel Jensen Associate Professor of History and East Asian Languages and Cultures
  72. Some Owners of Private Colleges Turn a Tidy Profit by

    Going Nonprofit “There is a concern that the now- nonprofit colleges may be providing an impermissible private benefit to their former owners. These sorts of arrangements raise yellow flags.” Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer Professor of Law
  73. Fathers-to-be may have hormonal changes too “The testosterone changes might

    relate to factors between the partners - how their relationship dynamics and interactions change during the pregnancy,” Gettler said. Lee Gettler Assistant Professor of Anthropology
  74. GOP Candidates to Attend Pope Events Despite Differences "Regardless of

    what the Pope says or emphasizes, the simple fact of being associated with his visit is still significant for a candidate." David Campbell Packey J. Dee Professor of American Democracy Department Chair, Political Science
  75. Migrant children test Europe as Mediterranean crisis worsens "The Mediterranean

    will continue to be a heavily trafficked and deadly space," said Maurizio Albahari. Maurizio Albahari Assistant Professor of Anthropology
  76. Why the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize matters “The Nobel committee

    has chosen to highlight the work of civil society in mediating in a national crisis. It may be seen as a ray of hope in an otherwise turbulent region.” Peter Wallensteen Richard G. Starmann Sr. Research Professor of Peace Studies
  77. Honor Comes Late to Óscar Romero, a Martyr for the

    Poor The Rev. Gustavo Gutiérrez, the Peruvian priest whose 1971 book first outlined liberation theology, said Archbishop Romero was motivated by the poverty and suffering he saw in El Salvador rather than by any ideology. Rev. Gustavo Gutiérrez John Cardinal O'Hara Professor of Theology
  78. Pope Francis begins historic visit to New York

  79. The Present Past “Religion is a better explanation of southern

    exceptionalism. The Civil War divided most of America’s Protestant sects.” Mark Noll Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History
  80. Sleep On It: Your Brain Never Takes a Night Off

    “For something as natural to humans as breathing, sleep suffers from a bit of a reputational crisis. Somewhere along the line, sleep became the adult equivalent of eating your vegetables, something you have to do to get to something else you'd rather be doing, like eating dessert.” Jessica Payne Associate Professor, Nancy O'Neill Collegiate Chair in Psychology
  81. U.S. retail brokers, to avoid regulators’ wrath, disclose more “But

    the vast majority of retail investors - those who want their trades executed immediately - actually benefit from the financial relationships between their brokers and market makers.” Robert Battalio Professor of Finance
  82. Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer Professor of Law New IRS Rules On

    Dark Money Likely Won't Be Ready Before 2016 Election “If the IRS issues a proposal in late spring, it's possible new rules could be finalized before the 2016 election,” said Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer.
  83. Mary Ellen O’Connell Robert and Marion Short Professor of Law,

    Research Professor of International Dispute Resolution Drones Are Illegal Beyond the Battlefield “Proposals to develop a ‘drone court’ are analogous to older proposals for a court to issue ‘torture warrants.’ In both cases the defenders of these ideas fail to realize that the law absolutely prohibits torture and targeted killing beyond armed conflict zones.”
  84. David Cortright Director of Policy Studies at the Kroc Institute

    for International Peace Studies Why the Iran Deal Is a Good Option -- and a Christian One Cortright concludes, "The deal isn't perfect, but it is very good. It achieves the priority goal of U.S. and international policy of reducing and placing tight controls on Iran's nuclear capability ... The choice is clear. Support the current nuclear deal or face a future of more proliferation and war."
  85. Richard W. Garnett Paul J. Schierl/Fort Howard Corporation Professor of

    Law, Concurrent Professor of Political Science Parents’ Beliefs Should Be Honored, Within Reason “We cannot always accommodate sincere religious objections. But when we can, and to the extent we can, we should.”
  86. The Connection Between Honesty and Good Health In 2012, Anita

    Kelly, a psychology professor at the University of Notre Dame, spent 10 weeks tracking the health of 110 adults. "When they told more lies, their health went down," she has said. "And when they told the truth, it improved." Anita Kelly Professor of Psychology
  87. Pope Speeds Up, Simplifies Process for Marriage Annulments Candida Moss

    Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity "It is a democratizing move focused on easing the course of reintegration into the church for women, in particular."
  88. Supreme Court takes on specialty license plates "The case is

    important because it provides an opportunity for the justices to clarify legal doctrines that continue to confuse the courts, officials and citizens," said Richard W. Garnett of Notre Dame Law School. Richard W. Garnett Paul J. Schierl/Fort Howard Corporation Professor of Law, Concurrent Professor of Political Science
  89. Why One Researcher Thinks Mothers And Infants Should Share Beds

    "It may be 2015, and we may live in an urban, industrial setting, but this breastsleeping system has been humankind's oldest sleeping arrangement and feeding method," McKenna told The Huffington Post. James J. McKenna Rev. Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C., Professor of Anthropology Director, Mother-Baby Behavioral Sleep Lab
  90. "(Pope Francis) needs someone that can be unobtrusive or doesn't

    interfere with that encounter that means so much to him, so Monsignor has a very delicate task I think that he seems to be doing marvelously.” Pope Francis' translator and 'wingman,' Monsignor Mark Miles, gains fans of his own Kathleen Sprows Cummings Director, Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism, Associate Professor of American Studies
  91. The message of the pope’s visit to a Harlem school

    “Today, our attention will turn to the small community of Our Lady Queen of Angels, a school that has quietly been serving on the margins for 120 years. And in the weeks that follow, long after Pope Francis’ portrait has been whitewashed from the buildings and subway cars, the school will continue to serve those same children.” Rev. Timothy Scully Founder, Alliance for Catholic Education and the Hackett Family Director of the Institute for Educational Initiatives
  92. Why Bank Earnings Reports Might Be Old News Jeffrey Burks,

    a Notre Dame associate professor who co-authored the study, said “more advertising or publicizing of the timing of when these [call reports] come out is warranted” by the bank regulators who post them. Jeffrey Burks Viola D. Hank Associate Professor of Accountancy
  93. Evangelicals’ Claims of Conservative Supremacy Are Overstated "To (millennials), 'religion'

    means 'Republican,' 'intolerant,' and 'homophobic,'" wrote Putnam and Campbell in Foreign Affairs magazine. "Since those traits do not represent their views, they do not see themselves -- or wish to be seen by their peers -- as religious." David Campbell Packey J. Dee Professor of American Democracy Department Chair, Political Science
  94. The Pope, the Poor and the Benefits of Wealth “Similarly,

    if private markets cannot provide decent jobs for all, government must step in with job- creation programs of its own. This would require the redistribution of income that Catholic social teaching supports, but which, alas, many American politicians deplore.” Donald Kommers Joseph and Elizabeth Robbie Professor of Political Science, Concurrent Professor Emeritus of Law
  95. New Study Identifies the Most Underappreciated Investment Skill In a

    recent paper, Martijn Cremers, now of University of Notre Dame, and Ankur Pareek of Rutgers, analyzed a large sample of actively-managed all-equity U.S. retail mutual funds over a 19-year period (1995- 2013) and found that only those with both high active share and patient investment strategies, where managers hold stocks longer instead of trading frequently, tended to outperform by an average of 2.3 percentage points a year, even after management costs were taken out. Martijn Cremers Professor of Finance
  96. Pope Takes Cautious Stance in Cuba on Dissidents Having reached

    out to dissident groups such as the Ladies in White that were detained and prevented from attending Mass, the Vatican would be to some extent responsible for them, said Candida Moss, professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame. Candida Moss Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity
  97. How the Fantasy Football Scandal Will Affect IPOs for DraftKings

    and FanDuel "How the public will react to the story … will be interesting to watch," says Ed Edmonds, associate dean for library and information technology and a law professor at Notre Dame Law School. "This could have a big impact on the future of FanDuel and DraftKings. But if they were to go public in the current environment, I think they would do quite well." Ed Edmonds Associate Dean for Library and Information Technology and Professor of Law
  98. “He will have succeeded if he makes the rhetoric of

    conversion live again in the hearts of Americans, because in the end, it is not theories that change the world, but hearts.” John Cavadini Professor of Theology, Director of the Institute for Church Life
  99. Timothy Matovina Professor of Theology and Co-Director of the Institute

    for Latino Studies Pope Francis’ Preaching Style on Display in Cuba “Francis’ homilies suspend time and place in wondrous ways,” Timothy Matovina, professor of theology and co-director of the University of Notre Dame’s Institute for Latino Studies, says. “He doesn’t just interpret the Gospel, he allows the Gospel to interpret us, to let the voice of the Lord speak today as it did those centuries ago.”
  100. O. Carter Snead William P. and Hazel B. White Director

    of the Center for Ethics and Culture and Professor of Law Here's how the anti-abortion movement plans to modernize it's approach "We show the pro-life movement cares more about women -- and their babies -- than the abortion rights movement does, which doesn’t care about them," said O. Carter Snead.
  101. Gianna Bern Associate Teaching Professor of Finance and Academic Director,

    Master of Science in Finance “The mid-cap and small-cap operators are going to be hardest hit because this is all driven by their cost to produce,” said Gianna Bern, founder of Brookshire Advisory and Research Inc., who also teaches international finance at the University of Notre Dame.
  102. Why the Ashley Madison Hack Can Save Your Marriage Agustín

    Fuentes, a PhD in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Notre Dame, reminds us that "the idea that romantic love and marriage are connected and that marriage is the ultimate outcome for a couple in love gained prominence in the 16th century and rapidly spread across much of the western world, and now much of the globe. Previously, and in many societies still today, there is no necessary connection between romantic love and marriage." Agustín Fuentes Professor of Anthropology
  103. Charlice Hurst Assistant Professor, Mendoza College of Business Have a

    horrible, emotionally abusive boss? Here’s what NOT to do. "Abusive supervisors didn’t respond to followers being positive and compassionate, and doing things to be supportive and helpful," said Charlice Hurst, an assistant professor at Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business who was a co-author on the paper. Their findings, she said, seem to "clash with common sense."
  104. 1 Totally Common Shopping Habit That’s Wrecking Your Budget Timothy

    Gilbride Associate Professor of Marketing “The unplanned selection may cue other forgotten needs,” writes lead author and University of Notre Dame associate marketing professor Timothy Gilbride.
  105. Little Flower Catholic church now Michigan’s second basilica "It brings

    great interest to the building, to people who might not know it otherwise," said Duncan Stroik, a religious architecture expert at the University of Notre Dame who edits the Sacred Architecture Journal. A basilica's goal "is to foster devotion — and that by visiting the Shrine it would lead people to deeper faith," Stroik said. Duncan Stroik Professor Architecture
  106. Kathleen Sprows Cummings Director, Cushwa Center for the Study of

    American Catholicism, Associate Professor of American Studies Philadelphia Illustrates Catholic Church’s Dueling Dynamics in America “Today the fault line in the Catholic Church in Philadelphia is internal,” said Ms. Cummings, who directs Notre Dame’s Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism.
  107. "Industrial electricity usage can be used to track production and

    output in real time," said study author Zhi Da. Study: Electricity usage can predict stock market Zhi Da Viola D. Hank Associate Professor of Finance
  108. Richard W. Garnett Paul J. Schierl/Fort Howard Corporation Professor of

    Law, Concurrent Professor of Political Science Should Washington set out to change religious beliefs? “Religious freedom under law is an accomplishment, one that is both relatively new and always vulnerable. It is vulnerable precisely because it is often inconvenient to political authorities and officials.”
  109. Why do people on the other side seem so unreasonable?

    Cassel followed up with “Also no law by Congress — that is what you wrote in the August 2002 memo,” to which Yoo replied “I think it depends on why the President thinks he needs to do that.” Douglass Cassel Notre Dame Presidential Fellow Professor of Law
  110. ISIL activity drives up Pentagon threat level Ebrahim Moosa Professor

    of Islamic Studies "While all threats should be taken seriously, we should not fall victim to (ISIL) psyops' strategy against U.S. military personnel and security forces," Moosa said.
  111. Pressure To Act Unethically Looms Over Wall Street, Survey Finds

    “Our behavior is influenced by the norms that we believe exist in the industry, the norms that we believe exist in the organization. If there's an increased salience of the fact that everybody else is doing this, we also know from psychological research on peer pressure that I will be more likely to do it myself.” Ann Tenbrunsel David E. Gallo Professor of Business Ethics
  112. The Importance of STUDENT-athletes “At Play Like a Champion, we

    work with thousands of dedicated youth and high school coaches and athletic directors who are committed to making sure that their athletes are well-rounded people before all else.” Clark Power Founder and Director of Play Like a Champion Today & Professor of Psychology and Education
  113. Jimmy Gurulé Professor of Law Manhunt for ‘El Chapo’ races

    clock "It's a humiliation and an embarrassment to the Mexican government," Gurulé said. "The question is whether the political pressure that builds — if any — as a result of El Chapo's escape places enough pressure on the government to bring him to justice."
  114. Here are three reasons why Southern Baptists are on the

    decline Some parents and leaders subtly exchange rigorous Bible teaching for what Notre Dame sociologist Christian Smith has called “Moralistic Therapeutic Deism.” Here the stark, surprising gospel of Jesus fades into a cheaper American creed: “I have hope for heaven,” devotees think, “because I am an American, my good outweighs my bad, and God loves all his children.” Innumerable media and entertainment outlets, and even Christian- themed programs, peddle this message, but it is not Christianity. Christian Smith Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center for the Study of Religion and Society
  115. Tunisia’s National Dialogue Quartet wins Nobel Peace Prize "This is

    a peace prize for the work of civil society in mediating in a national crisis." Peter Wallensteen Richard G. Starmann Sr. Research Professor of Peace Studies
  116. For most voters of color, email controversy is no reason

    to dump Hillary Clinton Latinos and other voters of color “go with what they know and they’ve had more exposure to her and her husband. They remember the [good] economy when Bill Clinton was in office. All of those things come into play to impact their evaluations.” Ricardo Ramírez Associate Professor of Political Science
  117. Super-size McDonald’s raise benefits us all “Higher minimum wages improve

    workplaces both by giving workers the incentive and the means to perform better on the job. If they can afford to get childcare, see a doctor occasionally to prevent absence-causing illnesses and put gasoline in the car, they find it easier to report for work.” Benjamin Radcliff Professor of Political Science
  118. Kathleen Sprows Cummings Director, Cushwa Center for the Study of

    American Catholicism, Associate Professor of American Studies For conservatives, sowing confusion Experts say that seems unlikely. “American Catholics have always felt that the pope doesn’t understand their situation,” said Kathleen Cummings, who directs the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism at the University of Notre Dame. “It’s a recurring phenomenon.”
  119. Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C. President Pope Francis, the Aftermath:

    Catholic Social Teaching & College Curricula Finally, as the president of Notre Dame, John Jenkins, C.S.C., remarks in his recent essay on “The Challenge and Promise of Catholic Higher Education for Our Time,” it bears repeating that the commitments that form “part of the fabric of Catholic teaching” do not stand beyond the range of debate. “On the contrary,” Jenkins claims, “it is precisely these commitments that can open up the possibility of interesting debate.”
  120. Richard W. Garnett Paul J. Schierl/Fort Howard Corporation Professor of

    Law, Concurrent Professor of Political Science Legally, ‘God’s authority’ is a tough issue Such compromises can be difficult to find. Appeals to “natural law,” and morality, as Davis and Bunning discussed Thursday, are difficult for a judge to assess, said Richard Garnett, a Notre Dame law professor who specializes in religion and the law.
  121. Astrophysicists produce the first age map of the halo of

    the Milky Way University of Notre Dame astronomer Timothy Beers and his Galactic Archaeology group, which includes Notre Dame astronomers Daniela Carollo and Vinicius Placco, have led an international team of researchers that produced the first chronographic (age) map of the halo of the Milky Way galaxy. The halo, along with the disk and bulge, are the primary components of the galaxy. Tim Beers Professor of Astrophysics
  122. Papal order shines light on climate change’s impact on poor

    Joyce Coffee Managing Director, Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index "People, governments and corporations in lower-income countries are increasingly impacted by droughts, superstorms, civil conflicts and other disasters caused by climate change," according to Joyce Coffee of the Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index, which ranks the climate adaptation performance for the world's countries.
  123. Candida Moss Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity Biblical

    Studies/Christianity and Judaism in Antiquity History of Christianity In Pope Francis’s visit, White House sees a chance to transcend politics “If Obama said some of the things that Francis says, he’d be labeled a Trotsky-ite,” said Candida Moss, a theology professor at the University of Notre Dame. “It must be amazing for him to be able to say that I am just to the right of Pope Francis on this issue.”
  124. This Map Shows The Countries That'll Survive Global Warming In

    2014, the University of Notre Dame produced a definitive ranking system that showed how countries around the world would fare if global warming increased at its current rate.