The Life and Death of a Rails App

The Life and Death of a Rails App

Now that it has become a mature web development framework, Rails is no longer the exclusive realm of burgeoning startups. Healthy small and large businesses have grown with Rails for years. Shrinking and dying companies too.

871fc089cd3cbbc18b9f868c8dd85cce?s=128

Olivier Lacan

April 17, 2018
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    Opportunity Cost noun Economics the loss of potential gain from

    other alternatives when one alternative is chosen.
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    $ rails new tool $ rails new other_tool $ rails

    new best_tool $ rails new micro_service $ rails new macro_service $ mix phx.new ruby_3x3 $ express async_all_the_things
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    require "active_model/railtie" require "active_job/railtie" # require "active_record/railtie" require "action_controller/railtie" require

    "action_mailer/railtie" require "action_view/railtie" require "action_cable/engine" require "sprockets/railtie" require "rails/test_unit/railtie"
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    Rails and SOA: Do I really need 
 to have

    this big app? December 26, 2013 Developing complex web applications (not particularly Rails apps) is a tricky task. You write your models, controllers, services and optimize application architecture iteratively. But even with the great architecture when your application starts to be huge, bad things happen. Every little feature you’ll add will cost you precious time - tests must pass on your CI and workers needs to be reloaded every time you deploy. In addition, you begin to realize that mental overhead with keeping modules separated is huge - you have to remember a lot of things to keep it in right fashion. Ultimately, working on a project is hard, TDD technique is inefficient to use and you’re not happy at all with your code.
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    SOA

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    +

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    “During the gold rush its a good time to be

    in the pick and shovel business” Probably Not Mark Twain
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    504

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    HTTP Status 504 The server, while acting as a gateway

    or proxy, did not receive a timely response from an upstream server it needed to access in order to complete the request.
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    Hey! Thank you for the message As I said I

    have found several SERIOUS security vulnerabilities; so I want to ask you if you can make a "team" on hackerone.com . It's a platform where security researchers report vulnerabilities to company.
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    How GDPR Will Change 
 The Way You Develop Europe’s

    imminent privacy overhaul means that we all have to become more diligent about what data we collect, how we collect it, and what we do with it. In our turbulent times, these privacy obligations are about ethics as well as law. Web developers have a major role to play here. After all, healthy data protection practice is as much about the development side — code, data, and security — as it is about the business side of process, information, and strategy.
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    Personally identifiable information Personal information, described in United States legal

    fields as either personally identifiable information (PII), or sensitive personal information (SPI), as used in information security and privacy laws, is information that can be used on its own or with other information to identify, contact, or locate a single person, or to identify an individual in context.
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    According to the European Commission, "personal data is any information

    relating to an individual, whether it relates to his or her private, professional or public life. It can be anything from a name, a home address, a photo, an email address, bank details, posts on social networking websites, medical information, or a computer’s IP address."
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    create_table "users", force: :cascade do |t| t.text "name" t.string "email"

    t.datetime "created_at" t.datetime "updated_at" t.datetime "current_sign_in_at" t.datetime "last_sign_in_at" t.string "country_code" t.string "current_sign_in_ip" t.string "encrypted_password" t.string "last_sign_in_ip" end
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    20%

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    No.

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