Designing VUI

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October 25, 2019

Designing VUI

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October 25, 2019
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  1. None
  2. Designing for Voice User Interfaces Saleem Mohammed Principal UX Designer

    II Pegasystems
  3. • An estimated 8 billion digital voice assistants will be

    in use by 2023 • The voice assistant market has grown significantly because of increasing reliance on technology to simplify everyday tasks • Voice-based input methods will increase accessibility to the visually-impaired community B A C K G R O U N D R E S E A R C H The future of voice technology
  4. B A C K G R O U N D

    R E S E A R C H Industry leaders
  5. • With Voice UIs (VUIs), there is a need for

    conversational, voice-first interactions to be anticipated and designed for • There is a huge need for the design to be adaptable to the many ways that users could express meaning and intent. The system needs to handle a range of phrases. • The same conversation can be expressed in several different ways. VUI design must represent the majority of possible paths that can be taken. B A C K G R O U N D R E S E A R C H Why is the design process different?
  6. B A C K G R O U N D

    R E S E A R C H How do industry leaders design VUIs? User-centered research Design after determining: 1. Purpose of the system 2. How users can invoke the system 3. What users will be able to do 4. What information the system needs from the users Map out Interaction Flow Build a flow chart showing: 1. Keywords that lead to interactions 2. Welcome, help, & error messages 3. Entry & exit points of conversation 4. Example dialogues for both the system and the user Test Interaction Flow Use testing to discover: 1. Conversational dead-ends 2. Interactions where the flow is chopped 3. Missing use-cases 4. How users feel about the amount of system feedback Avoid common Pitfalls Deliver as much content as possible to users without account linking. Know when system should use explicit v. implicit confirmations Use informal, conversational tone <
  7. B A C K G R O U N D

    R E S E A R C H How do industry leaders design VUIs? User-centered research Design after determining: 1. Purpose of the system 2. How users can invoke the system 3. What users will be able to do 4. What information the system needs from the users Map out Interaction Flow Build a flow chart showing: 1. Keywords that lead to interactions 2. Welcome, help, & error messages 3. Entry & exit points of conversation 4. Example dialogues for both the system and the user Test Interaction Flow Use testing to discover: 1. Conversational dead-ends 2. Interactions where the flow is chopped 3. Missing use-cases 4. How users feel about the amount of system feedback Avoid common Pitfalls Deliver as much content as possible to users without account linking. Know when system should use explicit v. implicit confirmations Use informal, conversational tone <
  8. B A C K G R O U N D

    R E S E A R C H How do industry leaders design VUIs? User-centered research Design after determining: 1. Purpose of the system 2. How users can invoke the system 3. What users will be able to do 4. What information the system needs from the users Map out Interaction Flow Build a flow chart showing: 1. Keywords that lead to interactions 2. Welcome, help, & error messages 3. Entry & exit points of conversation 4. Example dialogues for both the system and the user Test Interaction Flow Use testing to discover: 1. Conversational dead-ends 2. Interactions where the flow is chopped 3. Missing use-cases 4. How users feel about the amount of system feedback Avoid common Pitfalls Deliver as much content as possible to users without account linking. Know when system should use explicit v. implicit confirmations Use informal, conversational tone <
  9. B A C K G R O U N D

    R E S E A R C H How do industry leaders design VUIs? User-centered research Design after determining: 1. Purpose of the system 2. How users can invoke the system 3. What users will be able to do 4. What information the system needs from the users Map out Interaction Flow Build a flow chart showing: 1. Keywords that lead to interactions 2. Welcome, help, & error messages 3. Entry & exit points of conversation 4. Example dialogues for both the system and the user Test Interaction Flow Use testing to discover: 1. Conversational dead-ends 2. Interactions where the flow is chopped 3. Missing use-cases 4. How users feel about the amount of system feedback Avoid common Pitfalls Deliver as much content as possible to users without account linking. Know when system should use explicit v. implicit confirmations Use informal, conversational tone <
  10. Designing & Testing a VUI P E G A U

    X
  11. • Goal: • Discussion-based platform to gather information about target

    user’s behaviors, attitudes, and beliefs • Helpful in exposing issues and gaps within design • Our Session: Organized and recruited 2 groups, one in India and one in Cambridge • Had a series of questions prepared to lead the discussion • Feedback varied between the two groups • Allowed us to understand what should be key features, and what our edge cases to consider were U S E R - C E N T E R E D R E S E A R C H Focus groups
  12. U S E R I N T E R A

    C T I O N F L O W D E S I G N Flow design • Tool: draw.io , similar tools: Visio, LucidChart, SmartDraw • What to include: • Use color as a differentiator between system output and user input • Include steps that the system needs to take in the background • Dictate how the system will break apart user intents • Mark entry and exit points of conversation • Include possible variations for every phrase of user intent
  13. • Goal: • To recognize and understand patterns of flow

    that would be handled poorly or ‘chopped’ with the design • To gauge how user’s felt about the error messages, amount of system confirmation, and feedback style • Method: • Recruited 4 participants , One team member acted as the system, the participant acted as the user • The person representing the system read corresponding system output to whichever query the test user had • Results: • Most prevalent pain points expressed were: lack of system confirmation, poorly designed error messages • After 2 participants giving similar feedback about the lack of system confirmation, we modified the system to give more confirmation so that we could see what other issues persisted. U S A B I L I T Y T E S T I N G Role-play usability testing
  14. U S E R I N T E R A

    C T I O N F L O W D E S I G N Design iterations & feedback • Added significant system confirmations • Designed intermediate error messages for specific error states • Modified possible flow paths • Changed representation of error messages to red • Updated Key
  15. • Google (draw.io), Microsoft (Visio), and several other companies offer

    robust tools for quick, flexible editing of flow design. Looking at components (arrows, blocks, paths, etc.) that these programs offer could be valuable for future research involving adding components for designing voice interactions to our Cosmos Design System. • It is crucial for designers working on projects involving Voice UIs to have a strong understanding of how development builds conversational interactions. • Testing for VUIs involved different variables and procedures than testing GUIs. • It is important to recruit test participants who have a general understanding of how VUIs typically function. • Role-play testing is doable with a low-fidelity prototype, and offers a great method of catching errors in flow. R E S E A R C H TA K E AWAY S Key insights
  16. Thanks! Questions? saleem.mohammed@in.pega.com P E G A U X