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Peter Singer on global poverty

Peter Singer on global poverty

Slides for an Introduction to Philosophy course at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, BC, Canada. These slides talk about Singer's articles: "Famine, Affluence & Morality," and "The Singer Solution to World Poverty"

philosophy
Singer
Peter Singer

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Christina Hendricks

March 12, 2018
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Transcript

  1. PETER SINGER ON AFFLUENCE & GLOBAL POVERTY PHIL 102, SPRING

    2017 CHRISTINA HENDRICKS UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Except images licensed otherwise, this presentation is licensed CC BY 4.0
  2. TWO WAYS SINGER ARGUES 1. Argument from a principle he

    thinks we will all accept (“Famine, Affluence & Morality”) 2. Argument from analogy (mostly in “The Singer Solution”) If an act is morally right in this situation It is morally right in a similar situation Situation 1 Situation 2
  3. ARGUMENT FROM A PRINCIPLE

  4. OUTLINE HIS ARGUMENT IN “FAMINE, AFFLUENCE, & MORALITY” • Conclusion:

    many people should be doing more to help those in need than they are. • What is the principle he bases his argument on? • What other premises are there?
  5. EVALUATING ARGUMENTS Remember the steps in evaluating arguments: 1. Are

    the premises true? 2. If the premises are true, does the conclusion follow with certainty or high probability? • Deduction & induction Concl.
  6. EVALUATING SINGER’S ARGUMENT Discuss with one or two others &

    write down on doc linked below: 1. Premises true? 2. Conclusion follows with certainty or high probability? 3. Anything else you think should be taken into consideration when evaluating this argument? https://is.gd/phil102singer
  7. SINGER ON DUTY AND CHARITY Morally required/prohibited What must or

    must not be done Singer: “duty” Morally permissible/optional 1.What can be done (what is permitted) 2.Supererogatory: praiseworthy but optional Singer: ”charity”
  8. IMPLICATIONS Draw line between morally required (duty) and supererogatory (charity)

    differently We should be “working full time to relieve great suffering” (“Famine”) Image licensed CC0 from pixabay.com
  9. Comfortably off people should give 10% of income (“The Singer

    Solution to World Poverty” (Singer 1999)) 5% for those doing quite well ($100,000 to $150,000 U.S.), more for those with higher incomes, less for lower (The Life You Can Save (Singer 2009)) Image licensed CC0 from pixabay.com
  10. Creating bricks, Flickr photo shared by International Disaster Volunteers, licensed

    CC BY 2.0 NOT ONLY MONEY! Donate time, food, books, your knowledge & expertise… Soup kitchen in Chicago opened by Al Capone (1931), public domain On Wikimedia Commons
  11. WHAT DO YOU THINK SO FAR? Learning Catalytics questions…

  12. ARGUMENTS FROM ANALOGIES

  13. THE CHILD IN THE POND “She Summons Ducks,” Flickr photo

    by Peter Lindbergh, licensed CC-BY
  14. THE CHILD ON THE STREET (DORA EXAMPLE) “Dogs Get Better

    Treatment, Homeless Boy, Jakarta, Flickr photo shared by Danumurthi Mahendra, licensed CC-BY
  15. BOB AND HIS BUGATTI Bugatti Veyron Grand Sport Red/Black, Flickr

    photo shared by Axion 23, licensed CC-BY
  16. EVALUATING ARGUMENTS FROM ANALOGY 1. It is morally wrong to

    do action X in situation A 2. Situation A is similar in morally relevant respects to situation B 3. If it is morally wrong to do X in A, then it is morally wrong to do X in B Therefore, it is morally wrong to do X in B Are each of these premises true, for Singer’s analogies?
  17. ACTING ON ARGUMENTS “What is the point of relating philosophy

    to public (and personal) affairs if we do not take our conclusions seriously? In this instance, taking our conclusion seriously means acting on it.” (“Famine”) The Life You Can Save website, with a calculator for how much you should give, a pledge to give that much, and charities that have been researched: http://www.thelifeyoucansave.org/