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A framework for discourse in typeface design

A framework for discourse in typeface design

This lecture was delivered at the 6th ICTVC, in Thessaloniki. It discusses structuring relevant literature for teaching, and supporting independent learning, in typeface design.

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Gerry Leonidas

July 08, 2016
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Transcript

  1. A framework for discourse in typeface design Gerry Leonidas

  2. Discussing priorities | Developing a field Visual communication is now

    an established discipline with a burgeoning professional practice, varied educational systems, critical research, national and international conferences and competitions, trade magazines, and academic journals. 
 Across many areas, visual communication is entering a period of sustained growth and expansion. This calls for strategic decisions for directions of development, setting priorities for action, and clarifying relationships with related areas of activity.
  3. Developing a field: discussing priorities Visual communication is now an

    established discipline with a burgeoning professional practice, varied educational systems, critical research, national and international conferences and competitions, trade magazines, and academic journals. 
 Across many areas, visual communication is entering a period of sustained growth and expansion. This calls for strategic decisions for directions of development, setting priorities for action, and clarifying relationships with related areas of activity.
  4. Typeface design is a social enterprise.

  5. practice instructions compendia, indirect records historical accounts specifications for practice

    narratives of interpretation and explanation [theory]
  6. practice compendia, indirect records historical accounts instructions and specifications for

    practice interpretation, explanation [theory]
  7. Volume and intensity of practice obscure interpretation

  8. 1 Typemaking environments are commoditised

  9. None
  10. 2 The added value of design is redefined 
 away

    from the visible acts of practice
  11. 3 A typeface does not contain enough 
 information to

    explain itself
  12. Channels of distribution

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  19. “Rejection or ignorance of the rich and varied 
 history

    and traditions of typography are
 inexcusable; however, adherence to traditional 
 concepts without regard to contemporary 
 context is intellectually lazy and a threat 
 to typography today.” Jeffery Keedy
 The rules of typography according 
 to crackpots experts 
 Eye 9, 1993
  20. Visible Language* 50th anniversary issue *Journal of Typographic Research

  21. Visible Language 50th anniversary issue 240+ submissions

  22. Adobe. (1990) Adobe Type 1 Font Format Sutton, J., &

    Bartram, A. (1968) An atlas of typeforms Ahrens, T., & Magicura, S. (2014) Size-specific adjustments to type designs Lawson, A. S. (1990) Anatomy of a Typeface Lund, O. (1999) Knowledge construction in typography: the case of legibility research and the legibility of sans serif typefaces Hochuli, J., & Kinross, R. (1996) Designing books: practice and theory Poynor, R. (2003) No more rules: graphic design and postmodernism Spiekermann, E. (2013) Stop stealing sheep and find out how type works Spiekermann, E. (1986) Ursache und Wirkung. Ein typographischer Roman
  23. None
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  25. Twyman, Michael 
 (1998) The British Library guide to printing:

    history and techniques Twyman, Michael 
 (1970) Printing 1770–1970
  26. Framework for enquiry

  27. 1. Approaches to historiography 2. Paradigms for typemaking 3. Discussions

    of typefaces in the context of use 4. Examinations of specification for making 5. Explanations for typeform construction 6. Approaches to validation
  28. 1. Discussions the past 2. Ways of making type 3.

    Typefaces in documents 4. Capturing knowledge for others 5. Explanations of lettermaking 6. Does it work for that?
  29. Approaches to historiography

  30. None
  31. Paradigms for typemaking 1. letters made to size, mostly by

    hand 2. typefaces engineered for proprietary reproduction 3. typefaces as platform-independent products 4. typefaces as formal relationships within systems
  32. Discussions of typefaces in the context of use 1. lines

    and paragraphs 2. persistent documents and ephemera 3. Type families, type systems 4. global type, global typography
  33. None
  34. Implications of specification for making 1. models for letters 2.

    emerging disciplines of practice 3. typeface design as an open-ended system
  35. None
  36. Explanations for typeform construction 1. Gerritt Noordzij’s moving pen 2.

    Richard Southall’s models and patterns 3. organic / sampled / constructed patterns
  37. None
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  40. adhesifny adhesifny EssayText by Ellmer Stefan

  41. adhesifny adhesifny Fenland by Jeremy Tankard

  42. Approaches to validation 1. systems with defined constraints 2. the

    “performance” of rendered text
  43. None
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  45. 1. Approaches to historiography 2. Typemaking paradigms 3. Type in

    the context of use 4. Specification and making 5. Typeform theories 6. Approaches to validation
  46. None
  47. MRes Typeface Design

  48. Thank you @gerryleonidas @typefacedesign [speakerdeck.com/gerryleonidas]