Want to Be a Better Public Speaker? Then You Need to Master These 6 Tricks

Want to Be a Better Public Speaker? Then You Need to Master These 6 Tricks

Why does public speaking matter? Because this skill isn’t optional — not if you want to thrive in your career.

Indeed, every manager in every organization across every industry today is expected to know how to deliver a presentation. Whether you’re speaking while seated at a team meeting or roaming the room while keynoting a confab, you’ll find that addressing an audience is one of the most profitable skills you can possess.

Let me help you harness this power.

As a result of attending the below workshop, you’ll learn a variety of essential how-tos, including:

1. How to overcome your anxiety.
2. How to prepare.
3. How to interact with your audience.
4. How to vary your pitch and pace.
5. How to deploy your body language.
6. How to deliver your one big idea.
7. How to make your presentation a performance.

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Jonathan Rick
PRO

November 13, 2019
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Transcript

  1. WANT TO BE A BETTER PUBLIC SPEAKER? THEN YOU NEED

    TO MASTER THESE 6 TRICKS
  2. None
  3. “Of all the talents bestowed upon men, none is so

    precious as the gift of oratory. He who enjoys it wields a power more durable than that of a great king. He is an independent force in the world.” —Winston Churchill
  4. None
  5. “It’s incalculable how much value I got from that hundred

    dollars.” —Warren Buffet
  6. “Your message is only as good as your ability to

    deliver it.” —Brad Phillips
  7. Glassophobia Preparation Theater Body Language Interaction Slides

  8. None
  9. TRICK #1 GLOSSOPHOBIA

  10. — OBLIGATORY — — REFERENCE —

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  14. “The secret to controlling nervous energy is not to eliminate

    the butter- flies. It’s to get the butterflies flying in the same direction.” —Carmine Gallo
  15. Focus on a spot on the back wall.

  16. Make eye contact with people for no less than two

    seconds, but no more than five.
  17. Imagine your audience is naked. Make eye contact with people

    for no less than two seconds, but no more than five.
  18. Remember: the audience wants you to succeed! 4 Imagine your

    audience is naked. Make eye contact with people for no less than two seconds, but no more than five.
  19. TRICK #2 PREPARATION

  20. None
  21. “If you want to combat nerves, be more prepared. It’s

    the Midwestern work ethic.” —Jeff Daniels
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  23. “Genius is 1% inspiration, 99% perspiration.” —Thomas Edison

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  26. TRICK #2 PREPARATION Spec Sheets

  27. None
  28. Introduction

  29. Room Layout Introduction

  30. Mic Room Layout Introduction

  31. Audience Mic Room Layout Introduction

  32. Lighting

  33. Interruptions Lighting

  34. Background Image Interruptions Lighting

  35. Webcam Background Image Interruptions Lighting

  36. None
  37. “If a fire causes a stampede to the unmarked exits,

    it will have been worth it to those who survive.” —Steve Jobs
  38. TRICK #2 PREPARATION Mistakes

  39. None
  40. PLEASE STAND BY

  41. TRICK #2 PREPARATION How to Prepare

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  46. Phelps knew something was wrong as soon as he hit

    the water. There was moisture inside his goggles. He couldn’t tell if they were leaking from the top or bottom, but as he broke the water’s surface and began swimming, he hoped the leak wouldn’t become too bad. By the second turn, however, everything was getting blurry. As he approached the final lap, the cups of his goggles were completely filled. Phelps couldn’t see anything. Not the line along the pool’s bottom, not the black “T” marking the approaching wall. He couldn’t see how many strokes were left.
  47. For most swimmers, losing your sight in the middle of

    an Olympic final would be cause for panic. Phelps was calm. That’s because he had long prepared for this possibility. His coach, Bob Bowman, had once made Phelps swim in a Michigan pool in the dark, believing that he needed to be ready for any surprise. Similarly, the visualization techniques Phelps practiced religiously included a scenario for goggle failure.
  48. As he started his last lap, Phelps estimated how many

    strokes the final push would require — 19 or 20, maybe 21 — and started counting. He felt totally relaxed as he swam at full strength. Midway through the lap he began to increase his effort, a final eruption that had become one of his main techniques in overwhelming opponents. At 18 strokes, he started anticipating the wall. He could hear the crowd roaring, but since he was blind, he had no idea if they were cheering for him or someone else.
  49. Nineteen strokes, then 20. It felt like he needed one

    more. That’s what the videotape in his head said. He made a 21st, huge stroke, glided with his arm outstretched, and touched the wall. He’d timed it perfectly. When he ripped off his goggles and looked up at the scoreboard, it said “WR” — world record — next to his name. He’d won another gold.
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  52. TRICK #2 PREPARATION How Not to Prepare

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  56. Ø Sleep strengthens your memory. Ø Sleep enables you to

    focus. Ø Sleep regulates your emotions. Ø Sleep helps you stay energetic when you’re awake.
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  59. TRICK #2 PREPARATION How Much to Prepare

  60. 99

  61. 100

  62. Preparation prevents poor performance.

  63. TRICK #2 PREPARATION To Script or Not to Script

  64. None
  65. SEMANTICS CONNECTION Deliver every word with precision. Inspire and influence

    your audience.
  66. TRICK #3 THEATER

  67. “He could headline even with my act.” —Comedians

  68. TRICK #3 THEATER Movement

  69. Movem ent

  70. Movem ent

  71. Movem ent

  72. “It sounds like a tiny thing, but it was transformative.”

    —Kumail Nanjiani Movem ent
  73. Movem ent

  74. TRICK #3 THEATER Humor

  75. “When you talk to people about — let’s call them

    ‘issues,’ okay? — they have their defenses up. They’re going to defend their point of view, the thing they’re used to, the ideas they hold dear, and you have to take a long, logical route to get through to them. But when you’re doing comedy or humor, people are open; and when the moment of laughter comes, their guard is down, so you can introduce new data.” —George Carlin Hum or
  76. TRICK #3 THEATER Props

  77. Props

  78. Props

  79. TRICK #4 BODY LANGUAGE

  80. “What people tell you with their eyes and hands is

    more important than what they tell you with their mouth.” —Lyndon Johnson
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  82. TRICK #4 BODY LANGUAGE Your Hands

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  85. TRICK #4 BODY LANGUAGE Rocking

  86. TRICK #4 BODY LANGUAGE Bodystorming

  87. TRICK #5 INTERACTION

  88. None
  89. “Listening is hard. Think about it. You’re in a less-than-comfortable

    chair, sitting up straight, crammed in among other people in the same situation. There’s no polite way to distract yourself with your phone or laptop. You certainly can’t read something. Often, you can’t even take notes. You have to sit there formal and poised, looking interested even if you’re not.” —Mike Long
  90. Image Identification Polls Recaps Quotes

  91. TRICK #6 SLIDES

  92. None
  93. I use my slides as notes.

  94. “The slides are for the audience, not the speaker. The

    purpose of projecting something on the wall is to reinforce, not repeat, the speaker’s words.” —Robert Frost Long Answer
  95. “Your deck is your sidekick, not your Teleprompter.” —Amanda Holt

    Short Answer
  96. If someone can get everything he needs to just by

    reading your slides, then there’s no reason to hear you in person. Savvy Susan
  97. If someone can get everything he needs to just by

    reading your slides, then there’s no reason to hear you in person. But then my slideshow won’t make sense on its own. Traditional Tina
  98. If someone can get everything he needs to just by

    reading your slides, then there’s no reason to hear you in person. But then my slideshow won’t make sense on its own. Good — that’s the point! A slideshow should be presented, not recited; delivered, not read. Savvy Susan
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  100. I’d loveto speak to your team! See anything of interest

    here? JonathanRickPresentations.com