Pro Yearly is on sale from $80 to $50! »

How to Make a Sandwich

How to Make a Sandwich

...Techniques for Effective Feedback

Feedback is one of the most important skills when collaborating with others. Giving and receiving feedback with honesty, integrity and empathy is hard. Doing so consistently takes practise and requires learning and practising feedback and listening techniques.

In this session, Dan discusses a number of feedback models and techniques and shows you where and how you can apply them. He explains the infamous and much-misunderstood “sandwich model” of feedback, how it works and why it usually doesn’t, and looks at some of the failure modes of feedback. Are you using feedback to help your colleagues and yourself to grow, or are you using it to coerce and control them? How do you know? And what does any of this have to do with Systems Theory?

After this session you will be better equipped to offer feedback, more resilient when receiving feedback, and maybe more aware of your own motivations for doing so.

08145ecb1ce091d9dd3c328ea2a707fb?s=128

Daniel Terhorst-North

March 08, 2016
Tweet

Transcript

  1. How to Make a Sandwich Dan North @tastapod

  2. Part 1: What is feedback?

  3. @tastapod Formalised in Systems Theory output Simple system input

  4. @tastapod Formalised in Systems Theory input output Dynamic system feedback

  5. @tastapod Formalised in Systems Theory input output Dynamic system Delay

    feedback
  6. @tastapod Formalised in Systems Theory input output Dynamic system Delay

    feedback
  7. Adaptive systems rely on feedback

  8. @tastapod Reinforcing feedback Accelerating loop - feedback amplifies behaviour -

    e.g. financial aid, addiction

  9. @tastapod Reinforcing feedback Accelerating loop - feedback amplifies behaviour -

    e.g. financial aid, addiction
 “Shifting the Burden”
  10. @tastapod Reinforcing feedback Diminishing loop - feedback suppresses behaviour -

    e.g. deterrent, resource starvation

  11. @tastapod Reinforcing feedback Diminishing loop - feedback suppresses behaviour -

    e.g. deterrent, resource starvation
 “Tragedy of the Commons”
  12. @tastapod Stabilising feedback Balancing loop - feedback tends towards stable

    goal - e.g. cooperation, upstream inlet

  13. @tastapod Stabilising feedback Balancing loop - feedback tends towards stable

    goal - e.g. cooperation, upstream inlet
 “Limits to Growth”
  14. @tastapod Oscillating feedback Thrashing “loop” - feedback flips between states

    - e.g. shower control, The Beer Game*
 * wikipedia.org/wiki/Beer_distribution_game
  15. @tastapod Oscillating feedback Thrashing “loop” - feedback flips between states

    - e.g. shower control, The Beer Game*
 “Boom and Bust” * wikipedia.org/wiki/Beer_distribution_game
  16. @tastapod Timing is everything

  17. @tastapod Timing is everything Small and frequent is better than

    large and infrequent
  18. @tastapod Timing is everything Small and frequent is better than

    large and infrequent 
 Delay in feedback increases “drift”
  19. @tastapod Timing is everything Small and frequent is better than

    large and infrequent 
 Delay in feedback increases “drift” - reduces system’s responsiveness
  20. @tastapod Timing is everything Small and frequent is better than

    large and infrequent 
 Delay in feedback increases “drift” - reduces system’s responsiveness - limits options
  21. @tastapod Timing is everything Small and frequent is better than

    large and infrequent 
 Delay in feedback increases “drift” - reduces system’s responsiveness - limits options - increases processing effort

  22. @tastapod Timing is everything Small and frequent is better than

    large and infrequent 
 Delay in feedback increases “drift” - reduces system’s responsiveness - limits options - increases processing effort
 This is why Lean Operations prefers small batch size
  23. @tastapod Why do we ask for feedback?

  24. @tastapod Why do we ask for feedback? - to improve

    or modify our behaviour

  25. @tastapod Why do we ask for feedback? - to improve

    or modify our behaviour
 - for help when we are stuck

  26. @tastapod Why do we ask for feedback? - to improve

    or modify our behaviour
 - for help when we are stuck
 - for recognition when we think we are doing well
  27. @tastapod Why do we offer feedback?

  28. @tastapod Why do we offer feedback? - to improve the

    system of work
  29. @tastapod Why do we offer feedback? - to improve the

    system of work - to model a culture of encouraging feedback
  30. @tastapod Why do we offer feedback? - to improve the

    system of work - to model a culture of encouraging feedback - to control others
  31. @tastapod Why do we offer feedback? - to improve the

    system of work - to model a culture of encouraging feedback - to control others - to demonstrate our superior knowledge
  32. @tastapod Feedback is a System

  33. @tastapod Feedback is a System Offered or Sought

  34. @tastapod Feedback is a System Offered or Sought Heard

  35. @tastapod Feedback is a System Offered or Sought Heard Actioned

  36. @tastapod Feedback is a System Offered or Sought Heard Actioned

  37. Part 2: Delivering feedback

  38. @tastapod Feedback should be about behaviour

  39. @tastapod Feedback should be about behaviour Feedback is usually heard

    at a personal level
  40. @tastapod Feedback should be about behaviour Feedback is usually heard

    at a personal level - “Your work is sloppy” heard as “You are a sloppy worker”
  41. @tastapod Feedback should be about behaviour Feedback is usually heard

    at a personal level - “Your work is sloppy” heard as “You are a sloppy worker” 
 How about:
  42. @tastapod Feedback should be about behaviour Feedback is usually heard

    at a personal level - “Your work is sloppy” heard as “You are a sloppy worker” 
 How about: - Your work has been sloppy recently
  43. @tastapod Feedback should be about behaviour Feedback is usually heard

    at a personal level - “Your work is sloppy” heard as “You are a sloppy worker” 
 How about: - Your work has been sloppy recently - On this specific occasion your work was substandard
  44. @tastapod Feedback should be about behaviour Feedback is usually heard

    at a personal level - “Your work is sloppy” heard as “You are a sloppy worker” 
 How about: - Your work has been sloppy recently - On this specific occasion your work was substandard - If you did these things your work quality would improve
  45. @tastapod Feedback should be about behaviour Feedback is usually heard

    at a personal level - “Your work is sloppy” heard as “You are a sloppy worker” 
 How about: - Your work has been sloppy recently - On this specific occasion your work was substandard - If you did these things your work quality would improve - If you did these things it would make me happier
  46. @tastapod SBI: a model

  47. @tastapod SBI: a model Situation

  48. @tastapod SBI: a model Situation Behaviour

  49. @tastapod SBI: a model Situation Behaviour Impact

  50. @tastapod In the team meeting on Friday SBI: a model

    Behaviour Impact
  51. @tastapod you spoke across me several times In the team

    meeting on Friday SBI: a model Impact
  52. @tastapod so I felt like I wasn’t being allowed to

    share my opinion with the team you spoke across me several times In the team meeting on Friday SBI: a model
  53. @tastapod Sidebar: the Ladder of Inference

  54. Part 3: Structuring feedback

  55. @tastapod Porpoise feedback

  56. @tastapod Porpoise feedback Offer specific positive regard

  57. @tastapod Porpoise feedback Offer specific positive regard Assume everything else

    will self- correct
  58. @tastapod Porpoise feedback Offer specific positive regard Assume everything else

    will self- correct Everything else will self-correct
  59. @tastapod Sandwich feedback

  60. @tastapod Sandwich feedback Offer specific positive regard

  61. @tastapod Sandwich feedback Offer specific positive regard Offer a growing

    edge
  62. @tastapod Sandwich feedback Offer specific positive regard End with general

    positive regard Offer a growing edge
  63. @tastapod “ Atkins” feedback Offer specific positive regard End with

    general positive regard Offer a growing edge
  64. @tastapod “ Atkins” feedback Offer a growing edge

  65. Part 5: Receiving feedback

  66. @tastapod Say “Thank you”

  67. @tastapod There is no step 2 Say “Thank you”

  68. Concluding thoughts

  69. @tastapod Feedback affects the system

  70. @tastapod Feedback affects the system 
 Be honest about your

    own motives
  71. @tastapod Feedback affects the system 
 Be honest about your

    own motives 
 Practise giving and receiving feedback
  72. @tastapod Feedback affects the system 
 Be honest about your

    own motives 
 Practise giving and receiving feedback 
 Always say “Thank you”
  73. @tastapod Thank you