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Responsive Design Along the Conversion Path (Magento Imagine 2015)

Responsive Design Along the Conversion Path (Magento Imagine 2015)

For the last three years, I’ve made the case for responsive, many-device eCommerce websites. Year one was about possibilities. Year two was about my experience on the front lines. Year three was about evolving a responsive frontend strategy for maintainability and performance.

This year I want to get back to business: RWD along the conversion path. I’ve spent the last 18 months building responsive B2B commerce with multi-billion dollar companies, and the last four years thinking about RWD + eCommerce.

This presentation details my thought process and the critical steps when designing for the conversion path as a complete user experience rather than a series of milestones. Expressing the details in this format brings value to the customer and the business.

More info: http://gravitydept.com/blog/magento-imagine-2015

Conference: Magento Imagine 2015
Speaker: Brendan Falkowski @ http://gravitydept.com
Location: Las Vegas, USA
Date: April 21, 2015

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Brendan Falkowski

April 21, 2015
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  1. Responsive Design Along the Conversion Path Brendan Falkowski Gravity Department

    Imagine Commerce Las Vegas, USA April 21, 2015
  2. Brendan Falkowski @Falkowski

  3. Standard Face @Falkowski

  4. GravityDept.com

  5. Frontend Strategy For GEMAIRE

  6. Responsive Design Consulting

  7. Frontend Audits Targeted performance consulting from Gravity Department

  8. Acumen Theme gravitydept.com/to/acumen • Used by 1400+ stores • 5+

    years of updates • Made for customization • Rapid launch
  9. None
  10. Hot 100 List — 2014 Mobile 10 List — 2014

    Internet Retailer Brilliant Newcomer Nominee — 2013 Top 25 Responsive Designs — 2013 Net Magazine Practical eCommerce eBay Blog Moz Web Performance Today Featured Across the Web KISSmetrics Conversion XL Smashing Magazine eConsultancy Yahoo! Small Business Mobify Creative Bloq Media Queries
  11. Advisory Board Member Magento Certification

  12. https://speakerdeck.com/brendanfalkowski/responsive-ecommerce-design-once-sell-everywhere https://speakerdeck.com/brendanfalkowski/responsive-design-panel-where-why-and-how https://speakerdeck.com/brendanfalkowski/responsive-ecommerce-part-two https://speakerdeck.com/brendanfalkowski/responsive-evolution 2012 2013 2014

  13. Responsive Design Along the Conversion Path

  14. Reduced technology footprint. Increased reach. Improved brand consistency. Merchants Love

    Responsive Design
  15. The Highest ROI vs Mobile Apps or Native Apps

  16. 1. Framing 2. Wayfinding 3. Filtering 4. Selecting 5. Assessing

    6. Converting 7. Delivering Responsive Design that Enhances the User’s Journey
  17. Framing 1

  18. Framing separates navigation from content.

  19. None
  20. Study the business and products first.

  21. Why do customers buy the product? How many products are

    purchased at once? What’s the frequency of orders? Is the focus on acquiring or retaining customers? Do you need to represent an offline business too? Are categories the most useful navigational taxonomy for your catalog? How critical is search relative to the catalog’s size? Is “buy now” more applicable than the “shopping cart” model? Should creating an account be emphasized or required? What priority do promotions, shipping terms and customer support have? Framing Questions
  22. Framing Content

  23. http://www.hugeinc.com/ideas/perspective/everybody-scrolls We learned that participants almost always scrolled, regardless of

    how they are cued to do so — and that’s liberating. “ Rebecca Gordon Research Lead @ Huge
  24. Framing Content journal.digital-atelier.com

  25. Framing is a convenience. It’s not content.

  26. 1. List all the elements you may include in the

    header. 2. 3. 4. 5. Better Framing
  27. 1. List all the elements you may include in the

    header. 2. Rank them by priority according to business goals. 3. 4. 5. Better Framing
  28. 1. List all the elements you may include in the

    header. 2. Rank them by priority according to business goals. 3. Group them into logical sets. 4. 5. Better Framing
  29. 1. List all the elements you may include in the

    header. 2. Rank them by priority according to business goals. 3. Group them into logical sets. 4. Design the small-screen interaction around these groups. 5. Better Framing
  30. 1. List all the elements you may include in the

    header. 2. Rank them by priority according to business goals. 3. Group them into logical sets. 4. Design the small-screen interaction around these groups. 5. Adapt the patterns for larger screens. Better Framing
  31. Navigating Authenticating Converting

  32. Promoting Navigating Finding Personalizing Converting Sales Home Search Scoping Sign

    In Link: Cart Offers Categories Search Form Sign Out Link: Checkout Free Shipping Lookbook Typeahead Dashboard # of Items in Cart Support Company Info Store Locator Wishlist Cart Subtotal
  33. Navigating Finding Converting Personalizing

  34. Framing Content

  35. Consistency Awareness Context Utility Successful Framing

  36. Wayfinding 2

  37. 1. Hierarchical navigation 2. Search 3. Advertisements and callouts 4.

    Recommendation engines 5. Shopping assistants 6. Personalization 7. Showrooming 8. Social proofing Wayfinding Methods
  38. 1. Hierarchical navigation 2. Search 3. Advertisements and callouts 4.

    Recommendation engines 5. Shopping assistants 6. Personalization 7. Showrooming 8. Social proofing Wayfinding Methods
  39. Your taxonomy must represent the catalog and enhance discoverability.

  40. Category-Driven Nav Persona-Driven Nav Headphones Beginners Mixers Enthusiasts Software Professional

    Turntables Example: DJ supplier taxonomies
  41. Good taxonomies lead users to products.

  42. Great taxonomies inform the user what you sell + how

    to find it.
  43. http://thenextweb.com/dd/2014/04/08/ux-designers-side-drawer-navigation-costing-half-user-engagement/ Nav Drawer or Nav Bar?

  44. High-level nav structure is always visible

  45. Rich Menus, One Tap Away

  46. 1. Maximum of three levels for taxonomy depth. 2. Maximum

    of seven child categories per parent. Taxonomy Guidelines
  47. Three Maximum Nav Levels

  48. Content is the landmark between navigation directions.

  49. 1. Dense menus are hard to orient within on small

    screens.
  50. 2. Filtering by attributes and sorting works better.

  51. 3. UI patterns for multi-level menus don’t scale forever.

  52. A shallower nav is more likely to be explored by

    users.
  53. Seven Maximum Nav Children

  54. 1. Faster to scan. 2. 3. Advantages of Narrow Branches

  55. 1. Faster to scan. 2. Increased visibility. 3. Advantages of

    Narrow Branches
  56. 1. Faster to scan. 2. Increased visibility. 3. Parent +

    children stay onscreen. Advantages of Narrow Branches
  57. Broad root branches need a containing menu

  58. None
  59. None
  60. None
  61. None
  62. Source

  63. Identify edge cases before designing the taxonomy UI.

  64. Showing breadth gradually becomes less important as users focus on

    products.
  65. Filtering 3

  66. Am I in the right place, should I go back,

    or go deeper? Can I exclude unsuitable products from this list? Is this product worth inspecting closer? User Concerns
  67. Are the sub-categories diverse? Are users shopping by aesthetic or

    specification? Is the list sensitive to order? Can users differentiate products from the list? Business Concerns
  68. Filtering UIs differentiate the shopping experience.

  69. None
  70. None
  71. Faceted navigation can be more effective for filtering.

  72. None
  73. None
  74. None
  75. None
  76. None
  77. Tailor the filtering UI to your catalog.

  78. Hint the filter toggle button.

  79. None
  80. Selecting 4

  81. Is “add to cart” the most important action?

  82. How would you prioritize the top five actions?

  83. The product view is designed for selection.

  84. 5% Pretty good conversion rate

  85. 95% Selecting another action

  86. Exercise 1/2: Non-Conversion Optimization

  87. 1. Assemble a team

  88. Add to cart Buy within a bundle Buy with complementary

    products Buy an alternative product being upsold Check product specs Add to wishlist Add to compare Write a review Share with others Go back Leave 2. List actions
  89. 35: Add to cart 15: Buy within a bundle 10:

    Buy with complementary products 10: Buy an alternative product being upsold 8: Check product specs 3: Add to wishlist 3: Add to compare 3: Write a review 3: Share with others 3: Go back 0: Leave 3. Divide 100 points
  90. Scores reflect the business’ goals — not what users do.

  91. 4. Note differences

  92. Exercise 2/2: Content Hierarchy

  93. Product name Product photo + media Availability + delivery estimate

    Price + promotion modifiers Configurable options + size charts Add to cart button Add to wishlist Social share 1. List every content component Upsells Description Specifications Reviews FAQs Cross sells Recently viewed products Breadcrumbs
  94. Product name + Photo Availability + Pricing Configure + Quantity

    Add to cart + save to wishlist + share Sweeten the deal (bundle or upsell) Description + Specs + Reviews + FAQs Redirect attention (cross sells + recently viewed) 2. Group related components
  95. 3. Rank components What am I looking at? ➔ Product

    name + Photo Can I obtain it? ➔ Availability + Pricing Which options? ➔ Configure + Quantity My action? ➔ Add to cart + save to wishlist + share Unsure? ➔ Sweeten the deal (bundle or upsell) Need more info? ➔ Description + Specs + Reviews + FAQs Not interested? ➔ Redirect attention (cross sells + recently viewed)
  96. https://twitter.com/lukew/status/541986443598393345 The issue isn’t whether the call to action is

    visible. The issue is whether your call to action is visible at the point where someone has become convinced to take action. “ Luke Wroblewski Product Director @ Google
  97. http://blog.chartbeat.com/2013/08/12/scroll-behavior-across-the-web/

  98. Assessing 5

  99. The cart is essentially a temporary wishlist.

  100. 1. Confirm what’s in the cart 2. Make edits 3.

    Apply any discounts 4. See the final price 5. Begin checkout User Goals
  101. 1. Product manifest 2. Coupon form 3. Shipping & tax

    estimate form 4. Totals table 5. Checkout button 6. Cross-sells Content Hierarchy
  102. The Cart Manifest

  103. Tables don’t work well on small screens.

  104. None
  105. 1. Browsers still download images in hidden columns. 2. 3.

    4. Table Consequences
  106. 1. Browsers still download images in hidden columns. 2. Lines

    wrap after a word or two. 3. 4. Table Consequences
  107. 1. Browsers still download images in hidden columns. 2. Lines

    wrap after a word or two. 3. Long words can easily overflow the table. 4. Table Consequences
  108. 1. Browsers still download images in hidden columns. 2. Lines

    wrap after a word or two. 3. Long words can easily overflow the table. 4. The lack of labels is unclear. Table Consequences
  109. None
  110. Densely packed buttons are hard to tap accurately.

  111. Product, options, quantity, price Inspecting Info

  112. Change quantity, save to wishlist, remove from cart Editing Actions

  113. None
  114. None
  115. Always Be Closing

  116. Cart button before manifest Menu with cart and checkout actions

  117. Converting 6

  118. Checkout on small screens forces focus on one thing.

  119. Most sites fail to make checkout micro optimizations.

  120. 1. Pre-fill all data you have.

  121. 2. Eliminate unnecessary inputs.

  122. 3. Make inputs work for users.

  123. 4. Copy identical info forward.

  124. 5. Use HTML5 input types.

  125. 6. Use HTML5 input attributes.

  126. 7. Use WHATWG standard `name` and `autocomplete` attributes. https://developers.google.com/web/fundamentals/input/form/label-and-name-inputs

  127. 8. Use HTML5 input placeholders.

  128. 9. Validate inline.

  129. Users don’t need any of this to complete forms, but

    you can/should provide it.
  130. Delivering 7

  131. Transactional email is the first touchpoint after a sale.

  132. 53% of email was opened on mobile devices in 2014

    https://litmus.com/blog/53-of-emails-opened-on-mobile-outlook-opens-decrease-33
  133. Order confirmation Shipment notification + tracking link Support inquiries Reminder

    to review products Share with a friend Password resets Common transactional email
  134. A little care goes a long way.

  135. Account dashboard: not where users spend time.

  136. Tracking a shipment Update addresses View order history Check gift

    card balance Organize wishlists Dashboard Tasks
  137. None
  138. None
  139. 1. Inlining Modules

  140. 2. Sidebar to Menu

  141. 3. Hub + Spokes

  142. None
  143. Wrapping Up

  144. 1. Framing 2. Wayfinding 3. Filtering 4. Selecting 5. Assessing

    6. Converting 7. Delivering
  145. Stay curious, keep your eyes open.

  146. Thank you

  147. Q&A

  148. Gravity Department GravityDept gravitydept.com magefrontend.com Brendan Falkowski Falkowski