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Tony Ulwick Put Jobs-To-Be-Done Theory Into Practice With Outcome-Driven Innovation

inuse
June 11, 2018

Tony Ulwick Put Jobs-To-Be-Done Theory Into Practice With Outcome-Driven Innovation

inuse

June 11, 2018
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  1. OUTCOME-DRIVEN INNOVATION®
    Jobs-to-be-Done Theory in Practice

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  2. “THE PCjr IS A FLOP”
    Wall Street Journal 1984

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  3. Hypothesis:
    If a product team could know in advance what
    metrics its customers were going to use to
    judge a new offering, it could optimize the
    product to address those metrics—and
    predictably deliver a winning solution.

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  4. FIRST SUCCESS
    In 1991 I led an effort to help Cordis Corporation break
    down and analyze the process cardiologists went
    through to “restore blood flow in a blocked artery.”
    Opportunities were revealed, prioritized and addressed.
    By mid-1993, Cordis launched 19 new angioplasty
    balloon products, all of which became number 1 or 2 in
    the market. Its market share increased from 1 percent
    to more than 20 percent.
    This work also led to the development of the stent—the
    fastest growing device in medical history.
    ODI has been
    refined and proven
    over 26 years.

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  5. “Ulwick’s outcome-driven
    programs bring discipline
    and predictability to the
    often random process of
    innovation.”
    – Clayton Christensen

    “I call him the Deming of
    Innovation because, more
    than anyone else, Tony has
    turned innovation into a
    science.”
    – Philip Kotler

    THEORY IN PRACTICE

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  6. “Innovation becomes much more
    predictable—and far more
    profitable—when it begins with a
    deep understanding of the job the
    customer is trying to get done.”
    “Innovation can be 100%
    predictable.”
    – Clayton Christensen
    PREDICTABLE INNOVATION

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  7. INCREASE
    CHANCES FOR
    SUCCESS 5-FOLD
    ODI IS PHENOMENALLY
    SUCCESSFUL
    Strategyn engaged an independent researcher to
    compare the success rates of innovation methods.
    The results show that while traditional methods
    yield a 17 percent success rate on average, the
    success rate of ODI is 86 percent.
    The chances of success increase 5-fold when
    using the Outcome-Driven Innovation process.

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  8. INNOVATION



    “The process of devising solutions…that address
    unmet customer needs.”

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  9. IDEAS NEEDS
    THE IDEAS-FIRST APPROACH IS INHERENTLY FLAWED
    Companies work to brainstorm, iterate and “fail fast” in order to discover the solutions that
    will address the customers unmet needs.

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  10. THE NEEDS-FIRST APPROACH MAKES MORE SENSE
    This approach applies marketing 101 logic. But while it makes intuitive sense, it doesn’t
    yield significantly better results. Why?
    IDEAS
    NEEDS

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  11. There isn’t agreement on
    how to define a “need” or on
    what types of needs exist.

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  12. Solutions
    Specifications
    Problems
    Requirements
    Customer Needs
    Wants
    Must haves
    Exciters
    Delighters
    Value drivers
    Latent needs
    Unarticulated
    needs
    Expectations
    Characteristics
    Desires
    Wishes
    Attributes
    Features
    Benefits
    Ideas
    Jobs
    Table stakes
    Anxieties
    Pains
    Gains
    Inspirations
    Behaved values

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  13. According to traditional VoC practitioners, a need statement could be
    anything that follows:
    • Assumptions of what a product should do
    • What a customer wants a product to do
    • What a customer would be surprised/delighted to see a product do
    • A benefit of using the product
    • The function a product performs
    • What a product lets you do
    • A detailed description of how a customer wants a product to perform
    • A problem that a product solves
    • An issue the customer is having
    • Criteria for success
    • A statement of a fundamental problem in a given situation that needs to
    be solved
    • A customer’s task demands
    VoC PRACTITIONERS DO NOT AGREE

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  14. NEEDS



    In the innovation equation

    “needs” must be defined as a constant.

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  15. “People don’t want a
    quarter inch drill, they want
    a quarter inch hole.”
    —Theodore Levitt
    CHANGE THE UNIT
    OF ANALYSIS
    Six Sigma principles can be applied to innovation
    when studying the “underlying process” that
    people are trying to execute while using a
    product or service, rather than studying the
    product or the customer. This thinking led to our
    innovation process:
    OUTCOME-DRIVEN INNOVATION®

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  16. JOBS-TO-BE-DONE OFFERS A NEW PERSPECTIVE
    When looking through a Jobs-to-be-Done lens, customers, markets,
    needs, segments and opportunities look different.
    i.
    People buy
    products and
    services to help
    them get a job done
    ii.
    The “job”—not the
    product—is the unit
    of analysis
    iii.
    A “job” is stable
    over time, making it
    a constant in the
    equation

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  17. OUTCOME-DRIVEN INNOVATION® (ODI)
    ODI is a customer-centric, data-driven strategy and innovation process that ties
    customer-defined metrics to the customer’s "job-to-be-done”.
    05.
    Use the data model to
    formulate a winning
    growth strategy
    04.
    Discover hidden
    segments of
    opportunity
    03.
    Quantify the degree to
    which each need is
    under/overserved
    02.
    Uncover the
    customer’s “needs”—
    tied to the job-to-be-
    done
    01.
    Define the market: job
    executor and “job-to-
    be-done”

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  18. Insert Picture here
    THE DATA MODEL MAKES
    INNOVATION PREDICTABLE
    Value creation becomes more predictable when
    you know the customer’s unmet needs and are
    able to assess how much better competing
    solutions/ideas will help the customer get the
    “job” done.
    DESIRED OUTCOMES OPP
    Minimize the time it takes to determine if/
    where any dissections have occurred
    12.4
    Minimize the time it takes to position the
    balloon across the lesion
    14.1
    Minimize the time it takes to open the blockage 5.2
    Minimize the likelihood of restenosis
    (recurrence)
    16.4
    Minimize the likelihood of damaging a vessel
    during the procedure
    12.7
    Minimize the time it takes to determine the
    location of an advancing balloon in the patient 10.5
    Minimize the time it takes to advance the
    balloon to the lesion 9.5
    Minimize the time it takes to stop patient
    bleeding at the entry point
    8.1

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  19. ODI INSIGHTS INFORM DECISION
    MAKING FOR YEARS TO COME
    The data model aligns teams with a common
    language and understanding of customers
    and their needs.
    The model drives customer-centric and data-
    driven decision making across the
    organization.
    Marketing
    Product
    planning
    Product
    development
    and design
    Digital, IoT,
    M&A, R&D,
    business
    model
    Customer
    experience
    Product
    portfolio
    management
    ODI
    Data
    Model

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  20. OUTCOME-DRIVEN INNOVATION® (ODI)
    ODI is a customer-centric, data-driven strategy and innovation process that ties
    customer-defined metrics to the customer’s "job-to-be-done”.
    05.
    Use the data model to
    formulate a winning
    growth strategy
    04.
    Discover hidden
    segments of
    opportunity
    03.
    Quantify the degree to
    which each need is
    under/overserved
    02.
    Uncover the
    customer’s “needs”—
    tied to the job-to-be-
    done
    01.
    Define the market:
    job executor and
    “job-to-be-done”

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  21. LP market MP3 market
    CD market Streaming market
    MARKETS ARE OFTEN DEFINED AROUND PRODUCTS
    All products will eventually become obsolete. But when a product goes away, it
    doesn’t mean the underlying market disappears.

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  22. LP market MP3 market
    CD market Streaming market
    DEFINE THE MARKET AROUND THE JOB-TO-BE-DONE
    People don’t want LP’s, CD’s, or 8 track tapes. They want to listen to music. The
    job-to-be-done doesn’t go away, even after a product is long gone.
    Listen to music

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  23. JOB TO BE DONE



    Can be anything a group of people are
    trying to accomplish.

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  24. MARKET = “JOB EXECUTOR” + “JOB-TO-BE-DONE”
    By defining a market as a job executor with a functional job-to-be-done,
    ODI provides a new avenue for market analysis.
    Listen to music
    Music enthusiasts

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  25. MARKET = “JOB EXECUTOR” + “JOB-TO-BE-DONE”
    By defining a market as a job executor with a functional job-to-be-done,
    ODI provides a new avenue for market analysis.
    Create a digital asset
    Business professionals

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  26. MARKET = “JOB EXECUTOR” + “JOB-TO-BE-DONE”
    By defining a market as a job executor with a functional job-to-be-done,
    ODI provides a new avenue for market analysis.
    Parents Pass on life lessons to children

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  27. MARKET = “JOB EXECUTOR” + “JOB-TO-BE-DONE”
    By defining a market as a job executor with a functional job-to-be-done,
    ODI provides a new avenue for market analysis.
    Cut a piece of wood in a straight line
    Tradesmen

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  28. MARKET = “JOB EXECUTOR” + “JOB-TO-BE-DONE”
    By defining a market as a job executor with a functional job-to-be-done,
    ODI provides a new avenue for market analysis.
    Legal teams Discover information that
    supports/refutes a case

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  29. MARKET DEFINITION IS CRITICAL AND NOT ALWAYS EASY
    Most products only get part of a job done. Don’t ask “what job does my product do.”
    Instead ask “what job is the customer trying to get done.”
    Prepare a hot beverage for consumption
    Boil water

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  30. OUTCOME-DRIVEN INNOVATION® (ODI)
    ODI is a customer-centric, data-driven strategy and innovation process that ties
    customer-defined metrics to the customer’s "job-to-be-done”.
    05.
    Use the data model to
    formulate a winning
    growth strategy
    04.
    Discover hidden
    segments of
    opportunity
    03.
    Quantify the degree to
    which each need is
    under/overserved
    02.
    Uncover the
    customer’s
    “needs”—tied to the
    job-to-be-done
    01.
    Define the market: job
    executor and “job-to-
    be-done”

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  31. JOB, JOB STEP, OUTCOME HIERARCHY
    Once the job-to-be-done is defined, we create the job map and collect outcomes within each
    step of the job.
    Job Step 4
    Job Step 3
    Job Step 1 Job Step 2 Job Step 5 Job Step…n
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Core Functional Job

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  32. THE JOB MAP IS USED TO ANALYZE THE JOB-TO-BE-DONE
    A Job Map details, step by step, what the customer is trying to get done—not what they are doing. 

    A Job Map is solution agnostic and applies across geographies. One map per market.
    The Customer-Centered Innovation Map, Harvard Business Review, 2008
    Confirm
    Verify
    Monitor
    Execute
    Define
    Plan
    Locate
    Gather
    Prepare
    Organize
    Modify Conclude

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  33. JOB MAP FOR ‘LISTENING TO MUSIC’ – FUTURE VISION
    The job map reveals what function the ultimate solution must provide to get the
    entire job done on a single platform. It outlines a roadmap for growth.
    Confirm
    Confirm the music
    plan
    Monitor
    Monitor the
    experience
    Define
    Assess the
    situation
    Locate
    Gather the desired
    music
    Prepare
    Order the music for
    listening
    Modify
    Modify the music
    selection
    Conclude
    Assess the
    experience

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  34. MP3 PLAYERS GET MORE OF THE JOB DONE
    While the LP and CD only enable the execution of the “listen” step,
    the MP3 solution gets more of the job done.
    Confirm
    Confirm the music
    plan
    Monitor
    Monitor the
    experience
    Define
    Assess the
    situation
    Locate
    Gather the desired
    music
    Prepare
    Order the music for
    listening
    Modify
    Modify the music
    selection
    Conclude
    Assess the
    experience

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  35. STREAMING SERVICES GET MORE OF THE JOB DONE
    Using your preferences, Pandora picks music for you and keeps track of
    what music you want to hear again.
    Confirm
    Confirm the music
    plan
    Monitor
    Monitor the
    experience
    Define
    Assess the
    situation
    Locate
    Gather the desired
    music
    Prepare
    Order the music for
    listening
    Modify
    Modify the music
    selection
    Conclude
    Assess the
    experience

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  36. JOB, JOB STEP, OUTCOME HIERARCHY
    Once the job-to-be-done is defined, we create the job map and collect outcomes within each
    step of the job.
    Job Step 4
    Job Step 3
    Job Step 1 Job Step 2 Job Step 5 Job Step…n
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Outcome
    Core Functional Job

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  37. THE “DESIRED OUTCOME” STATEMENT
    The perfect “need” statement has
    these unique characteristics and
    is called a “desired outcome”:
    • Stable over time: constant in
    the innovation equation
    • Tied to the job-to-be-done
    • A metric customers use to
    measure success when getting
    a job done
    • Measurable/controllable in the
    design of the product/service
    • Solution agnostic
    • Predictive
    • Research-ready
    • Cross-functionally applicable
    Company
    Customer

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  38. LISTENERS HAVE MANY DESIRED OUTCOMES
    A desired outcome is a structured statement that defines how customers
    measure value and how a company can create it.
    Giving Customers a Fair Hearing, MIT Sloan Management Review, 2008
    Minimize the time it takes to get the songs in the desired order for listening.
    Direction Object of control
    Metric Contextual clarifier

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  39. LISTENERS HAVE MANY DESIRED OUTCOMES
    Over 100 outcome statements are often needed to detail how customers measure
    the successful execution of the job.
    Confirm the music
    plan
    Monitor the
    experience
    Assess the
    situation
    Gather the desired
    music
    Order the music for
    listening
    Modify the music
    selection
    Assess the
    experience
    Minimize the time it takes to determine how much
    music will be needed, e.g., minutes, etc.

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  40. LISTENERS HAVE MANY DESIRED OUTCOMES
    Over 100 outcome statements are often needed to detail how customers measure
    the successful execution of the job.
    Confirm the music
    plan
    Monitor the
    experience
    Assess the
    situation
    Gather the desired
    music
    Order the music for
    listening
    Modify the music
    selection
    Assess the
    experience
    Minimize the time it takes to determine the
    order in which to play the songs

    View full-size slide

  41. LISTENERS HAVE MANY DESIRED OUTCOMES
    Over 100 outcome statements are often needed to detail how customers measure
    the successful execution of the job.
    Confirm the music
    plan
    Monitor the
    experience
    Assess the
    situation
    Gather the desired
    music
    Order the music for
    listening
    Modify the music
    selection
    Assess the
    experience
    Minimize the likelihood that the music sounds
    distorted when played at high volume

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  42. Insert Picture here
    OUTCOMES FUEL A
    PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR
    GROWTH
    Outcomes remain stable over time. Solutions
    change over time to satisfy the 100+ outcomes,
    enabling customers to get the job done better.
    Having a complete set of customer outcome
    statements is the holy grail of innovation: a
    complete and agreed upon understanding of the
    customer’s needs.
    Desired outcomes
    Minimize the time it takes to
    determine how much music will
    be needed
    -- -- -- --
    Minimize the time it takes to
    determine what songs to include
    -- -- + ++
    Minimize the time it takes to
    determine the order in which to
    play the songs
    -- -- + ++
    Minimize the likelihood that the
    music sounds distorted
    -- ++ + ++
    Minimize the time it takes to
    remove songs that you no
    longer want to hear
    -- -- + +
    Solutions

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  43. THE JOBS-TO-BE-DONE NEEDS FRAMEWORK
    Desired outcome 71
    Desired outcome 72

    Desired outcome n
    Desired outcome 51
    Desired outcome 52

    Desired outcome n
    Core functional job
    50 – 150 desired
    outcome statements
    Get the core job done better and/or more cheaply.
    Job executor
    Related jobs
    Related job 1
    Related job 2
    Related job 3
    Related job 4
    Related job 5
    Related job 6
    Related job 7

    Related job n
    Help get more
    jobs done.
    Job executor
    Emotional jobs
    Emotional job 1
    Emotional job 2
    Emotional job 3
    Emotional job 4
    Emotional job 5
    Emotional job 6
    Emotional job 7

    Emotional job n
    Add emotional
    appeal.
    Job executor
    Purchase
    Receive
    Install
    Setup
    Learn to use
    Interface with
    Maintain
    Upgrade
    Replace
    Consumption
    chain jobs
    Desired outcome 91
    Desired outcome 92

    Desired outcome n
    Improve the user
    experience.
    Job executor, other
    Financial
    outcomes
    Financial outcome 1
    Financial outcome 2
    Financial outcome 3
    Financial outcome 4

    Financial outcome n
    Enhance the
    business model.
    Buyer

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  44. OUTCOME-DRIVEN INNOVATION® (ODI)
    ODI is a customer-centric, data-driven strategy and innovation process that ties
    customer-defined metrics to the customer’s "job-to-be-done”.
    05.
    Use the data model to
    formulate a winning
    growth strategy
    04.
    Discover hidden
    segments of
    opportunity
    03.
    Quantify the degree
    to which each need
    is under/overserved
    02.
    Uncover the
    customer’s “needs”—
    tied to the job-to-be-
    done
    01.
    Define the market: job
    executor and “job-to-
    be-done”

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  45. ODI-BASED RESEARCH REVEALS UNMET NEEDS
    Statistically valid quantitative research reveals hidden segments,
    competitive strengths, unmet outcomes and more.
    When [job step], how
    important is it to you that
    you are able to:
    When using [solution], how
    satisfied are you with your
    ability to:
    Not at all
    important
    Somewhat
    important Important Very
    important
    Extremely
    important
    Not at all
    satisfied
    Somewhat
    satisfied Satisfied Very
    satisfied
    Extremely
    satisfied
    Outcome 2
    Using side-by-side
    ratings reduces both the
    actual length and
    perceived length of the
    survey for respondents.
    Minimize the time it takes to get
    the songs in the desired order

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  46. 0
    2
    4
    6
    8
    10
    0 2 4 6 8 10
    Outcome
    THE OPPORTUNITY LANDSCAPE
    Opportunity score = importance + max (importance – satisfaction, 0)
    Minimize the time it takes to
    get the songs in the desired
    order for listening
    Importance
    - - - V E IMP
    5 5 9 47 34 8.1 81%
    Satisfaction
    - - - V E SAT
    12 28 30 17 13 3.0 30%
    Opportunity Score
    13.2
    13.2
    30% of the sample rated
    the outcome very or
    extremely satisfied. 3.0
    81% of the sample rated
    the outcome very or
    extremely important
    8.1

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  47. 0
    2
    4
    6
    8
    10
    0 2 4 6 8 10
    Outcomes
    THE OPPORTUNITY LANDSCAPE
    The analysis reveals with precision where the market is under- and over served.
    Importance
    - - - V E IMP
    5 5 9 47 34 8.1 81%
    Satisfaction
    - - - V E SAT
    12 28 30 17 13 3.0 30%
    Opportunity Score
    13.2
    13.2
    3.0
    8.1
    Underserved
    Overserved
    Table
    Stakes

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  48. OUTCOME-DRIVEN INNOVATION® (ODI)
    ODI is a customer-centric, data-driven strategy and innovation process that ties
    customer-defined metrics to the customer’s "job-to-be-done”.
    05.
    Use the data model to
    formulate a winning
    growth strategy
    04.
    Discover hidden
    segments of
    opportunity
    03.
    Quantify the degree to
    which each need is
    under/overserved
    02.
    Uncover the
    customer’s “needs”—
    tied to the job-to-be-
    done
    01.
    Define the market: job
    executor and “job-to-
    be-done”

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  49. NOT ALL JOB
    EXECUTORS ARE ALIKE
    Segments of customers with different unmet
    outcomes exist because people struggle
    differently when executing the job-to-be-done.
    Demographic, psychographic and attitudinal
    segment classifications do not reveal segments of
    customers with different unmet outcomes. Traditional
    segmentation methods cause companies to target
    phantom segments.

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  50. GENDER DOES NOT REVEAL UNIQUE OPPORTUNITIES
    Our research proves that segmenting a market around gender
    does not reveal significant customer differences.
    0
    2
    4
    6
    8
    10
    0 2 4 6 8 10

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  51. AGE DOES NOT REVEAL UNIQUE OPPORTUNITIES
    Our research proves that segmenting a market around age
    does not reveal significant customer differences.
    0
    2
    4
    6
    8
    10
    0 2 4 6 8 10

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  52. OUTCOME-BASED SEGMENTATION
    The only way to find segments of customers with different unmet needs
    is to segment the market around unmet needs.
    Factor
    Group
    1
    Factor
    Group
    2
    Factor
    Group
    3
    Outcome 10
    Outcome 3
    Outcome 4
    Outcome 11
    Outcome 5
    Outcome 8
    Outcome 2
    Outcome 9
    Outcome 6
    Outcome 1
    Outcome 7
    The variables serve
    as a solid basis for
    segmentation.
    Variable 1
    Variable 2
    Variable 3
    Statistical-based clustering process
    Cluster analysis places respondents into a predetermined
    number of groups (segments) based on how they rated the
    importance and satisfaction of the segmentation variables.
    Segment profiling exercise
    The most important insight is figuring out what is causing
    respondents in one segment to struggle more/differently than
    others. This insight leads to the creation of statistically valid
    “personas” or segment descriptions.

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  53. ON AVERAGE A MARKET MAY APPEAR WELL SERVED
    But the average customer does not exist. There are always segments
    of customers with different unmet outcomes.
    0
    2
    4
    6
    8
    10
    0 2 4 6 8 10

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  54. DISCOVER HIDDEN SEGMENTS OF OPPORTUNITY
    Outcome-Based Segmentation reveals under- and overserved segments,
    their size, and which outcomes to target for growth.
    57%
    24%
    0
    2
    4
    6
    8
    10
    0 2 4 6 8 10
    19% of respondents
    57%
    24%
    Differentiated
    Disruptive
    Sustaining

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  55. 0
    2
    4
    6
    8
    10
    0 2 4 6 8 10
    21% of respondents
    45%
    34%
    DISCOVER HIDDEN SEGMENTS OF OPPORTUNITY
    Outcome-Based Segmentation reveals under- and overserved segments,
    their size, and which outcomes to target for growth.

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  56. 0
    2
    4
    6
    8
    10
    0 2 4 6 8 10
    31%
    34%
    35%
    DISCOVER HIDDEN SEGMENTS OF OPPORTUNITY
    Outcome-Based Segmentation reveals under- and overserved segments,
    their size, and which outcomes to target for growth.

    View full-size slide

  57. 0
    2
    4
    6
    8
    10
    0 2 4 6 8 10
    18% of respondents
    26%
    56%
    DISCOVER HIDDEN SEGMENTS OF OPPORTUNITY
    Outcome-Based Segmentation reveals under- and overserved segments,
    their size, and which outcomes to target for growth.

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  58. 0
    2
    4
    6
    8
    10
    0 2 4 6 8 10
    15% of respondents
    21%
    33%
    31%
    DISCOVER HIDDEN SEGMENTS OF OPPORTUNITY
    Outcome-Based Segmentation reveals under- and overserved segments,
    their size, and which outcomes to target for growth.
    Differentiated

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  59. Target =
    Job executor
    Segment
    Outcomes
    Knowing the target
    increases a company’s
    chances for success
    5-FOLD

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  60. INNOVATION BECOMES PREDICTABLE
    Bosch successfully entered the competitive and commoditized
    North American circular saw market with a saw that got the job done better.
    Rafter hook
    Redirected air flow
    Direct Connect Positive bevel stop
    “The CS20 was a hit with both users and
    channel partners. It was also recognized as
    one of the top 100 innovations in 2004 by
    Popular Science.”


    —Jason Shickerling, Product Manager

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  61. INNOVATION BECOMES PREDICTABLE
    Kroll Ontrack successfully entered the electronic evidence discovery market
    with an offering that got the job done better and more cheaply.
    “Knowing what outcomes were most
    underserved enabled the team to
    focus on what mattered most to the
    customer.


    After two failed attempts, Strategyn
    and ODI helped us disrupt a market
    and grow to a position of market
    leadership.”
    —Ben Allen, CEO

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  62. OUTCOME-DRIVEN INNOVATION® (ODI)
    ODI is a customer-centric, data-driven strategy and innovation process that ties
    customer-defined metrics to the customer’s "job-to-be-done”.
    05.
    Use the data model
    to formulate a
    winning growth
    strategy
    04.
    Discover hidden
    segments of
    opportunity
    03.
    Quantify the degree to
    which each need is
    under/overserved
    02.
    Uncover the
    customer’s “needs”—
    tied to the job-to-be-
    done
    01.
    Define the market: job
    executor and “job-to-
    be-done”

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  63. ODI INSIGHTS INFORM DECISION
    MAKING FOR YEARS TO COME
    The data model aligns teams with a common
    language and understanding of customers
    and their needs.
    The model drives customer-centric and data-
    driven decision making across the
    organization.
    Marketing
    Product
    planning
    Product
    development
    and design
    Digital, IoT,
    M&A, R&D,
    business
    model
    Customer
    experience
    Product
    portfolio
    management
    ODI
    Data
    Model

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  64. ARE YOU DEVELOPING A PCjr?


    JTBD + ODI MAKES
    INNOVATION PREDICTABLE

    View full-size slide

  65. @ulwick
    [email protected]
    Jobs-to-be-Done.com – articles and canvas
    Jobs-to-be-Done-book.com – free book download
    Put Jobs-to-be-Done Theory into Practice

    View full-size slide

  66. INTEGRATING ODI INTO YOUR ORGANIZATION
    Take your product teams on a unique innovation journey—help them see
    their markets through a Jobs-to-be-Done lens.
    Phase 01
    Gain agreement on what a need
    is and what the customer’s needs
    are
    Phase 02
    Gain agreement on what
    segments and unmet outcomes
    exist
    Phase 03
    Gain agreement on the plan to
    address the targeted unmet
    outcomes
    • Educate the team on JTBD and ODI
    • Translate the team’s customer
    insights into the JTBD Needs
    Framework
    • Refine and validate the set of
    outcomes with external customers
    • Gain cross-functional team
    agreement on the set of outcomes
    • Prepare a survey to collect
    importance and satisfaction data on
    each desired outcome statement
    • Translate the survey into required
    languages
    • Create the sample design and field
    the survey
    • Obtain results, conduct analyses and
    build the data model
    • Study and interpret the results of the
    research
    • Use the data model to build a market
    and product strategy
    • Teach others to use the data model
    to make growth decisions and/or
    facilitate sessions to guide team
    members.

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  67. Market = group of people using the same product (milkshakes)
    Market milkshakes
    differently to the target
    “segment”
    Modify the milkshake for
    the “segment”
    CHRISTENSEN’S JTBD THEORY IN PRACTICE
    Goal of Milkshake Marketing: sell more of a product that already exists
    Select the “segments” to target
    Discover a unique
    circumstance of product use
    Discover a unique
    circumstance of product use
    Discover a unique
    circumstance of product use
    Discover a unique
    circumstance of product use
    Assess competing solutions Assess competing solutions Assess competing solutions Assess competing solutions
    Describe each segment in terms of the
    JTBD (a complex, multilayered story with
    functional and emotional components)

    View full-size slide

  68. Market = a group of people with a common job-to-be-done
    Market existing products to
    each target segment
    Create new solutions that
    get the job done better
    and/or more cheaply for
    each segment
    ULWICK’S JTBD THEORY IN PRACTICE
    Goal of ODI: Create the ultimate solution for groups of people with a job-to-be-done
    Select the “segments” to target
    Describe each segment in terms of the
    unique circumstance that is causing its
    population to be under/over-served
    Define a complete set of customer needs: outcomes tied to the core job, consumption jobs, etc.
    Segment the market around the unmet outcomes (discover/size statistically valid segments of opportunity)
    Define the job executor and the “job” they are trying to get done

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