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Human-Centered Product Design

878d748403126c4fc92e87e30c4764d0?s=47 J Cornelius
June 10, 2019

Human-Centered Product Design

Presented at Techsylvania in Cluj-Napoca, Romania // June 10th, 2019

You have to build things with limited time and a limited budget. How do you make the most of both? Not only that, how do you get confidence and clarity in what you’re going to build and how you’re going to build it? Whether you’re a startup founder or the head of a corporate product team, you need the right strategies and tools to give your team the best chances of building products and services that give you a competitive advantage.

This presentation is practical guide to building digital products people love in the buyer-driven economy. It’s time companies embraced customer research, and rapid-prototyping, and built meaningful value propositions based on real customer needs and wants. We’ll look at the 5 Phases of product design and lay out a playbook for success in the new age.

Key Takeaways

1/ Product design is not a linear process, rather it involves tight collaboration and fluid switching between diverse skill sets.

2/ Customer research is an art, and applying some simple methodologies can help create a clear vision of customer needs.

3/ Successful businesses make research and prototyping an integral part of their culture, using research and data to drive critical product and business decisions.

878d748403126c4fc92e87e30c4764d0?s=128

J Cornelius

June 10, 2019
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Transcript

  1. !1 Human-Centered Product Design Techsylvania // Cluj-Napoca, Romania June, 2019

  2. !2 Are you sure you have a great idea?

  3. !3 No idea survives its first encounter with a customer.”

    — Steve Blank “
  4. !4 1. Problem Validation 2. Solution Prototyping 3. Solution Validation

    4. Brand & Product Strategy 5. Product Design & Development 5 Phases - From Idea to Company
  5. !5 Questions Asked People Interviewed Zero Questions x Zero People

    Zero Knowledge! Knowledge
  6. !6 The Tools

  7. None
  8. None
  9. None
  10. !10

  11. !11 Actors, Roles, and Segments CUSTOMER SEGMENT ROLE ACTOR ACTOR

    ACTOR ACTOR ACTOR ACTOR ROLE ACTOR ACTOR ACTOR ACTOR ACTOR ACTOR ROLE ACTOR ACTOR ACTOR ACTOR ACTOR ACTOR
  12. !12 Finding People

  13. !13 1. Demographics 2. Psychographics 3. Purchase behavior 4. Interests

    and Hobbies 5. Social behavior Get Very Specific
  14. !14 Women, never married, college educated, between 28 and 34,

    living in 30309, with household income under $75,000/yr, employed in a Fortune 1000, who drive to work, less than 10 miles, in a german car, who use an iPhone, and listen to podcasts about creativity and art, and follow Martha Stewart on Facebook, and post to Instagram more than 5 times per week, mostly about their dog, and buy their coffee at Starbucks, and might have a tattoo (that you’ll never see).
  15. !15 1. Get out of the building! 2. “Hallway testing”

    3. Recruit using Craigslist or Facebook 4. Hire a recruiting firm (no, not staffing) 5. Don’t use surveys! 6. Offer an incentive. Guerrilla Recruiting Tactics
  16. !16 Talking to People

  17. !17 1. Don’t try to find specific answers. 2. Don’t

    use questions as a checklist. 3. Don’t lead the witness. 4. Don’t spend all your time typing. 5. Don’t focus too hard on one thing. 6. Silence can be your friend. Interview Best Practices
  18. !18 1. Icebreakers 2. Stage Setters 3. Explorers 4. Refiners

    Interview Phases
  19. !19 • Thank you for talking with me today. •

    Can I get you a coffee/water? • Nice shoes! Icebreakers
  20. !20 • I understand you are a _________ • I’d

    like to learn about _________ • This is Joan, she’ll be taking notes. • Do you mind if I record our conversation for notes later? Stage Setters
  21. !21 • Tell me about your typical day. • What

    frustrates you about ________? • What have you tried? • What do you think other people do? • How do you feel about _______? Explorers
  22. !22 • Hmm, what do you mean by _______? •

    Tell me more about that… • Help me understand that better… • What was that again? • Here’s what I heard you say… Refiners
  23. !23 1. Are open ended. (not yes/no) 2. Go from

    general to specific. 3. Get them telling a story. 4. Don’t lead the witness. 5. Avoid introducing bias. 6. Sometimes, don’t get asked. Good Questions
  24. !24 1. Who handles [thing you’re improving] at your home/

    office? 2. Tell me about your role at [company]. 3. Tell me about your typical day. 4. How much time do you spend on [thing you’re improving]? Customer Segments
  25. !25 1. What are some unmet needs you have around

    [thing you’re improving]? 2. What product or service do you wish you had? 3. What kind of tasks take up the most time in your day? 4. What could be done to improve your experience with [process/role]? 5. What’s the hardest part about being a [demographic]? Problem Discovery
  26. !26 1. Do you find it hard to [process/problem]? 2.

    How important is [value you’re delivering] to you? 3. Tell me about the last time you [thing you’re improving] — (listen for complaints) 4. How motivated are you to solve/improve [problem/ process]? 5. If you had a solution to this problem, what would it mean to you? How would it affect you? Problem Discovery
  27. !27 Actors (Customers)

  28. None
  29. None
  30. None
  31. !31 Affinity Mapping

  32. !32

  33. !33

  34. !34 Roles (Personas)

  35. !35 Role 1 Role 2 Role 3 Role 4 Roles

    (Personas)
  36. !36 Role 1 Role 2 Role 3 Role 4 Customer

    Segment
  37. !37

  38. !38

  39. None
  40. None
  41. None
  42. None
  43. None
  44. None
  45. !45

  46. !46 You’re Ready for Phase 2

  47. !47 1. Problem Validation 2. Solution Prototyping 3. Solution Validation

    4. Brand & Product Strategy 5. Product Design & Development 5 Phases - From Idea to Company
  48. !48 Research Explore Design Test

  49. !49 We need to switch between innovation and optimization. Both

    modes of thinking are essential to design great things.
  50. !50 Paper Prototyping

  51. !51

  52. !52 • Whiteboard • Sticky Notes • Printer Paper •

    Sketchpads • Sharpies • Highlighters Toolkit
  53. !53 • Discuss elements and content • Begin defining priority

    and importance of elements and content • Quickly play with layouts and sizing of elements and content on screen Purpose
  54. !54

  55. !55 Lo-Fidelity Prototyping

  56. !56 • Axure • Balsamiq • OmniGraffle Toolkit

  57. !57 • Define basic layout and purpose of elements on

    screen. • Discuss various states of elements • Default, actionable, etc. • Begin testing the “feel” of workflows Purpose
  58. !58

  59. !59 Hi-Fidelity Prototypes

  60. !60 • Axure • Sketch • InVision • WebFlow •

    WordPress Toolkit
  61. !61 • Define fonts, colors, photos, and other visual elements

    • Make final decisions on appearance and functionality • Test real workflows with real people • Deliverable to development team Purpose
  62. !62

  63. !63

  64. !64 STAGE USE APPEARANCE INTERACTIVITY SKETCH Discuss rough ideas, define

    general layout and workflow. Hand-drawn on whiteboard or sketchpad None WIREFRAME Define overall layout, content areas, and interactive elements No text or images. Only outlines, boxes, and other shapes as needed. Little to none LOW-FIDELITY PROTOTYPE Refine layout and begin mapping out on-page and navigation interactions Black and white. Some text, outlines, boxes, and other shapes as needed. Shades of gray help indicate priority of elements. Minimal, just enough to move between screens and high level functionality. MEDIUM-FIDELITY PROTOTYPE Discuss content placement and visual priority. Refine workflows and on-page interactions Add minimal color. Some text and image content. Adds some complex on page interactions and limited motion/ animation if needed. HIGH-FIDELITY PROTOTYPE Discuss colors, fonts, images, and other visual elements. Full-color with text and images. It should look and feel like a real application, without any actual functionality. Nearly full-featured.
  65. !65 PROTOTYPE PROTOTYPE PROTOTYPE TEST TEST TEST Continuous Improvement

  66. !66 You’re Ready for Phase 3

  67. !67 1. Problem Validation 2. Solution Prototyping 3. Solution Validation

    4. Brand & Product Strategy 5. Product Design & Development 5 Phases - From Idea to Company
  68. !68 Testing Ideas

  69. !69 Questions Asked People Interviewed Zero Questions x Zero People

    Zero Knowledge! Knowledge
  70. !70 1. Hallway 2. Moderated 3. Remote Moderated 4. Remote

    Unmoderated 5. Automated Types of Tests
  71. !71 Good: 
 Casual way to gather quick feedback from

    the people already around you. Bad: The people already around you are probably biased. Hallway Testing
  72. !72 Good: 
 Can provide in-depth understanding of how people

    use the product Bad: Can be expensive and time consuming. You should use trained moderators. Limited number of people available. Moderated Testing
  73. !73 Good: 
 Services can provide trained moderators. Access to

    more people. Bad: Less detail that in-person, but not by much. Remote Moderated Testing
  74. !74 Good: 
 Gathers feedback from a large number of

    people quickly and inexpensively. Bad: You have to prescribe details of what will be tested. No chance to talk to the users directly during the test. Remote Unmoderated Testing
  75. !75 Good: 
 Once setup it requires very little effort

    to run. Can run 24/7 anywhere on earth. Bad: Best for testing small changes or basic interactions. Can generate false-positives if the test isn’t designed properly. Automated Testing
  76. !76 Tools

  77. !77 1. Axure 2. InVision 3. PingPong 4. UsabilityHub 5.

    UserTesting.com 6. QuickMVP Testing Tools and Platforms
  78. !78 Will They Pay?

  79. !79 1. One-Page Website 2. Email Address Capture 3. Analytics

    4. Simple Marketing Campaign Validating Product Value
  80. !80 LandingLion Unbounce QuickMVP

  81. !81 1. Explain what it does, clearly and concisely. 2.

    Describe the Value Proposition. 3. Highlight the unique selling points. 4. Address key concerns users had during testing. 5. Add a direct call to action. Critical Website Content
  82. !82 1. Remember psychographics? 2. Refine your audience as narrow

    as possible. 3. Use the “Problem Question” in the ad copy. 4. Plan to spend between $100 and $500. 5. Measure the results. Running a Campaign
  83. !83 Women, never married, college educated, between 28 and 34,

    living in 30309, with household income under $75,000/yr, employed in a Fortune 1000, who drive to work, less than 10 miles, in a german car, who use an iPhone, and listen to podcasts about creativity and art, and follow Martha Stewart on Facebook, and post to Instagram more than 5 times per week, mostly about their dog, and buy their coffee at Starbucks, and might have a tattoo (that you’ll never see).
  84. !84 1. Remember psychographics? 2. Refine your audience as narrow

    as possible. 3. Use the “Problem Question” in the ad copy. 4. Plan to spend between $100 and $500. 5. Measure the results. Running a Campaign
  85. !85 1. Bounce Rate: the first signal of good or

    bad. 2. On-page Activity: Did they scroll, click, etc.? 3. Conversion: How many people signed up? 4. Sales by _______: (segment, geography, etc.) 5. Afterglow: Ratio of actions after the initial CTA What to Measure
  86. !86 Now What?

  87. !87

  88. !88 Your Awesome Team

  89. !89 • Direct contact with your customers. • Find critical

    issues with your process. • Quickly and easily see what can be automated. • Zero development costs! Just Do Things Manually
  90. !90 1. Document as much as possible. 2. Use Zendesk

    (or something) to track requests. 3. Talk to your customers weekly. 4. Setup a forum or other way for people to talk. 5. When you see things repeat 10x, write a script. Doing Things Manually
  91. !91 1. Tasks: Fiverr, Upwork, Thumbtack 2. Graphics: 99designs 3.

    Content: Scripted 4. Development: Toptal, Topcoder Other Resources
  92. !92 PROTOTYPE PROTOTYPE PROTOTYPE TEST TEST TEST Continuous Improvement

  93. !93 You’re Ready for Phase 4

  94. 1. Problem Validation 2. Solution Prototyping 3. Solution Validation 4.

    Brand & Product Strategy 5. Product Design & Development 5 Phases - From Idea to Company
  95. What is 
 a Brand?

  96. Mesopotamian Bottle Cap ~3000 B.C.

  97. None
  98. A brand exists at the intersection of what you do

    and how people feel about it.
  99. September 1982, five people died after taking cyanide-laced Tylenol. One

    of the most trusted brands in the market became one of the most feared. OVERNIGHT!
  100. BRAND

  101. BRAND CUSTOMER

  102. CUSTOMER BRAND

  103. CUSTOMER FRIEND FRIEND

  104. CUSTOMER BRAND FRIEND FRIEND

  105. Companies must understand what their customers are thinking and feeling

    to make products people want.
  106. !106 1. Brand Ethos Development 2. Naming 3. Identity Design

    4. Standards & Guidelines 
 Development Naming & Identity Process
  107. A brand exists at the intersection of what you do

    and how people feel about it.
  108. !108 You’re Ready for Phase 5

  109. 1. Problem Validation 2. Solution Prototyping 3. Solution Validation 4.

    Brand & Product Strategy 5. Product Design & Development 5 Phases - From Idea to Company
  110. !110

  111. !111 Photo Credit: Brad Frost

  112. !112 Delightful Usable Valuable Feasible What is an MVP?

  113. !113 Delightful Usable Valuable Feasible Delightful Usable Valuable Feasible What

    is an MVP? NOT THIS THIS!
  114. !114 Testing Ideas

  115. !115 Typical Design Team Product Owner Designers Developers

  116. !116 THE PRODUCT Typical Process Developers Designers

  117. !117 Better Design Team Product Owner Designers Developers

  118. !118 A Common Language

  119. !119 Design Operations THE PRODUCT APPLICATIONS SYSTEMS FRAMEWORKS CODE APPLICATIONS

    SYSTEMS COMPONENTS ELEMENTS Development Visual Design
  120. !120 Atomic Design Systems Atoms Molecules Organisms Templates Pages •

    Atomic Design • Benefits of Shared Design Systems • GE’s Predix Design System • ExxonMobil’s Design System • MorningStar’s Design System Reference
  121. Design System Templates Modules !121 Sketch InVision (Prototype) Design System

    Manager Components DSM Design Token API Process Overview Inspect Mode Automated Processes
  122. !122 Design is a Verb

  123. !123 Research Explore Design Test

  124. !124 An Iterative Approach

  125. !125 DESIGN DEVELOP DESIGN TEST TEST TEST Continuous Improvement

  126. !126 1. Value people and interactions over 
 processes and

    tools. 2. Respond to change over following a plan. 3. Emphasize collaboration with customers. 4. Stay focused on the problem they are solving. 5. Encourage constructive critique. Healthy Design Operations
  127. !127 THE PRODUCT Developers Designers Typical Process

  128. !128 THE PRODUCT Developers Designers Better Process

  129. !129 THE PRODUCT Developers Designers Customers Best Process

  130. !130 1. Collaborate on solving problems. 2. Believe in evidence

    based decision making. 3. Communicate effectively. 4. Publicly measure progress and hold each other accountable for quality. 5. Relentlessly listen to their customers. Design Operations #designops
  131. !131

  132. !132 Business Goals User Goals Designer Goals

  133. !133 PROTOTYPE PROTOTYPE PROTOTYPE TEST TEST TEST Continuous Improvement

  134. !134 Understanding what people want and designing things that delight

    them is the single most powerful way to achieve business goals.
  135. !135 LOOPS Building Products with Clarity & Confidence J CORNELIUS

    LOOPS J CORNELIUS Look out for my book coming this summer. Get an email when it’s released. bit.ly/loopsbook
  136. !136 Thank You ninelabs.com
 @ninelabs jcornelius.com
 @jc