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CNE Social Media Strategies

CNE Social Media Strategies

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The Spark Mill

May 06, 2016
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Transcript

  1. SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGY

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  3. SOCIAL MEDIA SERVICES •  Assessments •  Brand Voice •  Social

    Media Plans •  Campaign Strategy and Implementatio n •  Fundraising/ Crowdfunding
  4. OVERVIEW •  Storytelling •  Tools –  Blogs –  Instagram – 

    Infographics –  Twitter and Facebook •  Tactics –  Content Strategy –  Measurement –  Editorial Calendar –  Fundraising •  CASE BREAKS & SPARKS
  5. 1st Gift: THE BEST SOCIAL MEDIA GUIDE EVER

  6. TIME REQUIRED •  Listening: 5 hours a week •  Participate:

    10 hours •  Generate Buzz: 10-15 hours per week •  Share Your Story: 15-20 per week •  Community Building and Social Networking: # 20 hours plus per week http://beth.typepad.com/beths_blog/2008/10/how-much-time-d.html accessed October 2009
  7. MARKETING

  8. MARKETING IS… • WORDS • VISUALS • STRATEGY

  9. What is Your Social Media Personality 1. It’s a Conversation

    –  As a small business or nonprofit on social media you must dance the line between getting involved in local issues and getting too involved. 2. No more than 3 Reasons to Exist 3. Who you are on Social Media Channels should match who you are in life. –  If you are a feisty advocacy organization, your tweets/posts should be feisty and fierce. If you are a conservative and safe org. your messages should follow suit.
  10. SOCIAL MEDIA PERSONALITY

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  12. CREATE YOUR OWN •  3 Audiences •  3 Reasons to

    Report
  13. STORYTELLING

  14. “People don’t share commercials, they share emotions.” Scott Stratten via

    FastCompany.com
  15. WHY ARE STORIES IMPORTANT?

  16. YOUR STORY: CHANNELING A CHAMPION •  Your Story •  What

    Helped •  Transformation •  What do others need? •  What is your Call to Action
  17. CRAFT YOUR STORY

  18. SHIFT FROM NUMBERS TO PEOPLE

  19. TOOLS

  20. BLOGS •  Original Part of Web 2.0 •  Shortened form

    of “web log” •  Fast to update, requires little to no html knowledge •  Popular platforms: wordpress and blogspot
  21. What makes a good blog? •  Compelling images and videos

    •  Links to other social media •  Minimum post of 1 per week •  Interactive in creating a community •  Entertain them! •  Calls to Action
  22. MAKE IT SCANNABLE • Lists • Formatting • Headings • Pictures • Blockquotes • White space

    • KISS http://www.problogger.net/archives/2005/08/19/writing-blog-content-make-it-scannable/
  23. MAKE IT SHARABLE • Articles with images get 94% more total

    views. • Entertaining images • Use titles and alternate text • Are you getting pinned? Check! • http://www.pinterest.com/source/ thesparkmill.com/ http://www.jeffbullas.com/2012/05/28/6-powerful-reasons-why-you-should-include-images-in-your- marketing-infographic/#1tbiURdlIeje1mgg.99
  24. REPURPOSING CONTENT

  25. Examples of Good Blogs •  recent •  Links to more

    info •  Links to other social media
  26. Examples of Good Blogs

  27. Examples of good blogs •  Use Tumblr •  Use photos

    •  Instagram •  Social media links •  Using hashtags
  28. FACEBOOK PAGES http:// nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/ 2012/03/04/11-inspiring- nonprofit-facebook-timelines/

  29. FACEBOOK PAGES Measure and adapt

  30. TO AD OR NOT TO AD

  31. TWITTER ANALYTICS

  32. INSTAGRAM •  An instagram is worth 1000 words •  Simple

    tool to create useful stories and to curate content from others
  33. INSTAGRAM VIDEO •  Show Impact •  Tell Stories •  Inspire

    and Demonstrate Positive# Actions •  Teach Something •  Let Your Supporters Shine •  Testimonials •  Thank Supporters •  http://mediacause.org/7-ways-nonprofits-video-instagram/
  34. INSTAGRAM : NPOS THAT GET IT http://www.pinterest.com/ karvetski/instagram-nonprofits- that-get-it/

  35. BEST PRACTICES FOR NONPROFITS 1.  Report live 2.  Regram 3. 

    Add hastags to captions and like the photos of others 4.  Use third party apps –  Statigram – analytics –  Copygram – printing –  Flipagram and Slidagram 5.  One image a day 6.  Understand what makes a good instagram image 7.  Demonstrate impact, statistics in the captions
  36. FREE STOCK IMAGES •  http://list.ly/l/703

  37. MAKE VIDEOS •  Use what you have •  Prepare ahead

    of time •  Keep it short •  Choose your words carefully •  Include a call to action •  Choose good music https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szpN6nn2sMo
  38. SET UP AN E-NEWSLETTER

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  40. POWER OF VISUALS

  41. IF DIY: BASICS OF GOOD DESIGN 1.  2-3 Fonts 2. 

    3-4 Colors 3.  Clean Alignment 4.  White Space 5.  Specifications •  Formats •  Distributions •  Branding Guidelines
  42. BAD DESIGN

  43. IMPORTANCE OF BRAND STANDARDS

  44. IMPORTANCE OF EXTRAS together marvelo Strateg Retrea Board Organi Market

    Sarah Milston to write: sarah@thesparkm to talk: 804.852.6409 to browse: www.thesparkm to visit: 1623 W. Broad Str Sustai The Spark Mill is a c in Richmond, VA. Our between creativity, services are for peop desire change. We leap, and everything i THE SPA together, we can do marvelous things. Strategic Planning Retreats & Training Board & Team Development Organizational Development Marketing & Social Media Sarah Milston to write: sarah@thesparkmill.com to talk: 804.852.6409 to browse: www.thesparkmill.com to visit: 1623 W. Broad Street RVA Sustainability & Fundraising The Spark Mill is a consulting practice located in Richmond, VA. Our work occupies the spaces between creativity, strategy and action. Our services are for people and organizations who desire change. We can help you start, stop, leap, and everything in between. THE SPARK MILL BIO, RESUME & SUPPORTING MATERIALS SARAH MILSTON, CFRE, MPA Sarah Milston is the founder of The Spark Mill, a Virginia firm specializing in strategy and implementation work for nonprofits and small businesses. Sarah left 10 years of working with nonprofits in fundraising, marketing, and board development to build a varied and diverse consulting practice motivated by the belief that nonprofits can and do save the world. Along the way she embraced the idea that people, organizations and groups, not just nonprofits have the power and responsibility to save the world. Whether a guide, instigator, or knowledge base, Sarah is passionate about connecting the dots and giving people the right plan and tools to make stuff happen. Committed to the nonprofit sector, Sarah earned her Masters of Public Administration (MPA) from VCU and her Certified Fundraising Executive (CFRE) credentials from CFRE International. For more information visit the website at www.thesparkmill.com/who CONSULTING AND INSTRUCTOR HISTORY Sarah Milston is the Principal Consultant at The Spark Mill, LLC. She formerly was a Senior Consultant at Floricane, LLC and at DSG Consulting as well as the owner of Milston Consulting. Currently, she is an instructor for Nonprofit Learning Point (Richmond), Southside Community Partners (Tri-Cities) and Academy for Nonprofit Excellence (Tidewater) as will begin as an instructor for the Center for Nonprofit Excellence (Charlottesville) in 2014. BREADTH OF SERVICES Please see attached chart to show the breadth of services offered from strategic planning and strategy services to development and marketing and board development and retreats.
  45. SELF AUDIT •  Current State –  What do you look

    like? •  Tools •  Talent •  Budget •  Skills •  Future State –  Needs –  Resources –  Campaigns
  46. •  Coverpage •  Square logo •  Twitter logo •  Online

    News Page •  Own your content SPEND TIME IN THE BEAUTY SALON
  47. CREATE YOUR OWN

  48. MAKING GRAPHICS: PICMONKEY

  49. MAKING GRAPHICS: CANVA

  50. CONTENT & TACTICS

  51. TACTICS: EDITORIAL CALENDAR

  52. OVERALL PLANNING

  53. USING THE CALENDAR •  Consistency is key – Any schedule is

    fine, but be reliable. •  Proactive, not just reactive – Time sensitive news is great, but plan ahead •  Track deadlines, and stick to them – Assign and reroute if need be
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  55. MEASUREMENT •  You must keep asking,

  56. MEASUREMENT – 7 BASIC STEPS •  Define your goals • 

    Define your audiences •  Define your benchmarks •  Define your metrics, get buy in. •  Define your time and costs •  Select your data collection tools •  Collect and analyze your data then turn what you have learned into action. •  Beth Kanter, Measuring the Networked Nonprofit
  57. WHAT IS SUCCESS? •  Visits to website? •  Clicks? • 

    Likes? •  Donations? •  New Donors?
  58. POWER OF VOICES

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  60. ACAC MIDLOTHIAN AND THE POWER OF A NETWORK

  61. RVA BREASTFEEDS

  62. CAMPAIGN RECAP

  63. ACAC MIDLOTHIAN TODAY

  64. WHAT WENT WRONG •  Did not respond immediately •  Defensive

    stance •  No remorse •  Did not address key # audiences •  Inconsistent message •  Turned off comments on# you tube
  65. BY THE NUMBERS FACEBOOK •  Average 20 negative posts about

    Komen every minute •  Komen’s Facebook page saw a 288 percent increase in negative posts with a 99 percent decrease in “likes” per comment TWITTER •  Anti-Komen to pro-Komen tweets numbered 80 to 1 •  Twitter mentions focused on Komen at a rate of 2 to 1 •  Komen saw a 32,731% increase in Twitter mentions the week after the story broke, averaging 457,301 per day, up from 1,399 in a typical day# (http://cssc.uscannenberg.org/cases/v2/v2art4/)
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  67. IN A CRISIS? • Be attentive, be human. • Respond quickly. • Speak

    with a consistent # message. • DO NOT delete negative # comments. • Respond and invite # communication off line.
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  69. DO NOW •  Form a Team •  Set up a

    Crisis Protocol •  Create a pool of talented and trained champions •  Do work around worst case scenarios
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  71. CRISIS FAQS •  Acknowledgement of the crisis •  Details about

    the occurrence •  Photos or videos, if available •  How the organization found out •  Who was alerted, when, and how •  Specific actions taken in response •  Real or potential effects •  Steps taken to prevent future occurrence •  Contact information for real people at your company (http://www.convinceandconvert.com/social-media-strategy/dont-be-scared-be-prepared-how-to-manage-a- social-media-crisis/)
  72. CHAMPIONS

  73. WHY CREATE AND FIND CHAMPIONS 1. The power of a

    # testimonial will outperform # anything you create. 2. Champions can open # doors faster than you can. 3. It isn’t marketing, # its genuine.
  74. RECRUIT INFLUENCERS •  Find Them •  Reach out to them

    •  Give them all the tools they need Source: http://www.bethkanter.org/ambassadors/
  75. SO WHY DO PEOPLE SHARE THINGS? http://nytmarketing.whsites.net/mediakit/pos/

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  77. WHO MAKES A GOOD CHAMPION? •  Basic communication skills • 

    Enthusiasm for the cause •  Personal connection to the NPO •  Active Facebook profile & basic social media etiquette •  Positive outlook on life •  Willingness to learn •  Time to spend on social media
  78. WHERE ARE THEY? •  Your email newsletter – who is

    clicking and opening? •  Twitter – who is engaging? •  Facebook – who is engaging? •  Staff, board, volunteers, donors •  Online donors
  79. HOW TO GET CONTENT SHARED •  Appeal to people’s motivation

    to connect •  Inspire Trust •  Keep your messages simple •  Use humor •  Embrace a sense of urgency •  One share is the beginning •  Email is your best engine
  80. TELL A STORY •  The Issue Story – how your

    project solves a larger social issue •  The Local Story – how your project serves your community •  The People you serve – how the people you serve will be transformed •  The behind the scenes – sneak peek •  Innovation story – what you are doing that is unique •  Personal passion story – why your supporter is passionate
  81. CRAFT YOUR STORY

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  83. See our post? What can you do to help? 1. 

    Click like. 2.  Better yet, comment. 3.  Even better, click the share button! 4.  The best, share this link (www.blahblah.com) on your page and challenge your friends to participate.  
  84. GIVE THEM TOOLS

  85. FUNDRAISING

  86. Online Fundraising Development Storytelling Technology

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  88. 1.  Test your website http://mattkersley.com/responsive/ 2. E-Newsletter Metrics 3. Donation

    Page Checklist •  Donate Button on Homepage •  1 click from homepage •  Monthly giving option •  Branded Page •  Easy directions
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  90. Who are Online Donors •  90% shop online •  78%

    do banking and bill paying online •  Younger, more generous, in a hurry •  Comparing you to netflix and amazon •  Average age is 38-49
  91. Optimize Your Website for Online Giving •  Mobile Optimization • 

    Revamp your About Us page, pictures, bios •  Tell stories, don’t write books •  Your premium spot is your website, above the fold •  Link to GiveRichmond, 990s •  Don’t add other links •  Keep choices simple
  92. ROCKSTARS WORLD WILDLIFE FOUNDATION

  93. BENCHMARKS • For every 1000 visits to web, $612 raised • 7.2%

    of web visitors become donors • Average one time online gift $104 • Average monthly gift, $23 • Average email open rate 15% • Fundraising page completion rate 13% • Average tweets per day 5 • Average facebook posts per day 1.1 • 15-20% of annual donations come during December
  94. GREAT DONATION PAGES •  Color •  Design •  Easy to

    find button
  95. make it easier to raise money run a campaign social

    media & fundraising
  96. Fund/Friend/Fanraising •  Solicit Blog Posts •  Offer tweets and status

    messages •  Posting coverphotos
  97. Cause Marketing

  98. Broad View of Fundraising •  World AIDS Day 2011 • 

    400 gifts of only $100 – but unlimited amounts of PR, press, and good will generated.
  99. CROWDFUNDING • Indiegogo • Kickstarter (no guaranteed payout) • Gofundme (no Paypal) • Crowdrise

    Each has different characteristics – pay special attention to the requirements for getting the money raised. http://www.forbes.com/sites/chancebarnett/2013/05/08/top-10-crowdfunding-sites-for-fundraising/
  100. CROWDFUNDING •  Videos are more likely to go viral than

    just photos. –  why videos are more likely to go viral. http://www.ted.com/talks/kevin_allocca_why_videos_go_viral? language=en •  Your ability to tell your story is significantly increased by using video as a medium. –  http://www.ssireview.org/blog/entry/crowdfunding_for_nonprofits •  Using an organized platform gives you more legitimacy. –  Read more about the pluses and minuses of different platforms http://www.shareable.net/blog/how-to-crowdfund-your-campaign- or-non-profit •  Platforms help by creating and housing content that is easily shareable and low impact for donors. They are seamless and easy to use.
  101. CROWDFUNDING: INDIEGOGO

  102. CROWDFUNDING – KEEP UP THE MOMENTUM

  103. Ease of Giving Indiegogo 3%, first giving 3% Go Fund

    Me 5%, wepay 2.9% Pitchin – free, paypal 2.9% ImRaising free, paypal 2.9% Paypal 2.9%
  104. Matching Challenges

  105. Timely, Broad Reach, Defined Purpose

  106. Pennies in Protest 1.Decide you can do it! 2.Choose collaborators

    3.Decide who gets the money 4.Set up a Facebook page 5.Set up collection page 6.Seed the account 7.Write an email 8.Write a press release 9.Spread the word 10.Contact traditional media 11.Other counter-protests 12.Distribute the money 13.Write a thank you note 14.Pay it forward http://www.penniesinprotest.com/ $14,000 in RVA in 5 days
  107. Different Donors •  Donor to Donor – ie. First Giving

    •  Tap into wider range of givers •  What others can do is often better than what you can do
  108. Say thank you, often and creatively

  109. SAY THANK YOU, FAST

  110. PEOPLE RAISE MONEY •  Essential lessons are still true • 

    Ask for money. •  Say thank you. •  Ask again.
  111. RECAP & NUGGETS

  112. SOCIAL MEDIA CASE STUDIES •  HealthyLove Campaign •  Amnesty International

    •  James House https://www.youtube.com/user/ thejameshousehelps
  113. YOUR EXPERTS AND KEY RESOURCES •  Social media for social

    good – Heather Mansfield •  Beth Kanter’s blog: www.bethkanter.org •  Mashable - http://mashable.com/social-media/ Pew Internet & American Life Project - http://www.pewinternet.org/ •  John Haydon •  Kivi Miller http://www.nonprofitmarketingguide.com/blog/ •  NTEN •  NPENGAGE Magazine
  114. SOCIAL MEDIA IS NOW ABOUT ADVANTAGES •  Be like oreo,

    not Susan G. Komen.
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