Avoiding Information Redundancy

Avoiding Information Redundancy

I presented the 12-slide version of this slide at #iBlog9 this afternoon and I am happy to share this with you - my colleagues said that this made people think.

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Jay Agonoy

June 01, 2013
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Transcript

  1. AVOIDING INFORMATION REDUNDANCY JAY AGONOY

  2. JAY WHO? • Writer for Deremoe.com • Blogger for 4

    years (or so) • #iBlog attendee for three years (since #iBlog7) • Still a student
  3. Deremoe.com is a website that aims to be the destination

    for Opinion and Commentary for the Otaku community in the Philippines.
  4. LET’S TALK ABOUT: • Information Redundancy • Difference between this

    and Information Overload • Examples • What we should be aware of? • Suggestions
  5. WHAT IS INFORMATION REDUNDANCY? "Having the same information in multiple

    places." • Source: http://bluegartr.com.
  6. COMPARISON

  7. WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE? • In the modern information age,

    information overload is experienced as distracting and unmanageable information such as email spam, email notifications, instant messages, Tweets and Facebook updates in the context of the work environment.[1] [1] Hemp, P . (2009, September). Death by information overload. Harvard Business Review, 87(9), 83- 89. Retrieved from http://hbr.org/.
  8. INFORMATION REDUNDANCY IS WHEN A POST IS DUPLICATED IN ANOTHER

    PLACE (COPY-PASTA). INFORMATION OVERLOAD IS AN INSTANCE WHEN YOU RECEIVE TOO MUCH INFORMATION (TMI) THAN YOU CAN’T HANDLE.
  9. THE EFFECT OF INFORMATION REDUNDANCY An academic research paper published

    by the IEEE Computer Society Press "suggests that increasing redundancy in information access does not necessarily compensate for personnel turnover, and may actually decrease the rate of organizational learning and degrade performance". (Karley, K. (1990). Coordinating the success: trading information redundancy for task simplicity. Proceedings of the 23. Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (pp. 261 - 270 vol.4 ). Los Alamitos, Calif. [u.a.: IEEE Computer Society Press.) (Emphases mine)
  10. I’VE NOTICED THAT… • There are blogs (duh). • There

    are lots of blogs talking about one content. • There are lots of blogs that are sharing the same content that they’re talking about. • There are blogs that posts the press releases of the same topic copied from the same source.
  11. LOOKING BACK...

  12. TOO MUCH POSTS WITH EQUALLY SAME CONTENT = TOO MUCH

    INFORMATION = INFORMATION REDUNDANCY = INFORMATION OVERLOAD = WTH, AM I READING THE SAME THING OVER AND OVER AGAIN?
  13. ARE WE ROBOTS? SERIOUSLY. Image: Dr Stephen Dann on Flickr;

    CC BY-SA 2.0
  14. WE ARE HUMANS. Image: humanstatuebodyart (Eva Rinaldi) on Flickr; CC

    BY-SA 2.0
  15. THIS NEEDS TO STOP. PERIOD.

  16. WHAT CAN WE DO? (OR RATHER, WHAT WE DO) •

    Read it (with understanding). • Rephrase it to something different (as if you are the one speaking, not them) – tell the world what you understand about it. • In addition, it’s okay to quote someone. • Add flavor to it (so that readers can get the human feel; optional). • Reference the source for more information.
  17. BENEFITS (ARE THERE ANY BENEFITS?) • Avoids “walls of text”

    • You’re putting in effort to say the same thing in your own voice, thus you are trying to be unique – and in most cases, that’s what readers appreciate. • Since you’re linking back, you’re actually helping the source to gain more visitors. This is helpful for those who are running campaigns / causes.
  18. WHAT’S NEXT? • You can utilize your social platforms to

    share the same message if the message is short / you have nothing to say further. • Don’t force yourself to say it if it’s really not your urge to say so. • If you’re in a team, you can ask them for second advice.
  19. IN THE END, IT’S YOUR CALL TO AVOID INFORMATION REDUNDANCY

    (BUT WE WILL APPRECIATE IF YOU DO.)
  20. "You really have to bring something unique to the table

    in order to standout." - Patrick Macias, as interviewed by Lauren Orsini (http://otakujournalist.com/how-to-start-a-career-in-anime-journalism/)
  21. JAY AGONOY assortex@outlook.ph @assortex on Twitter