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Designing for Accessibility

Laura Kalbag
October 28, 2014

Designing for Accessibility

From a talk given at Web Day at Bath Digital Festival in October, 2014

Laura Kalbag

October 28, 2014
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  1. Designing for accessibility
    @laurakalbag laurakalbag.com
    AKA universal design AKA inclusive design

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  2. Are you are developer or a
    designer?

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  3. designing for accessibility isn’t
    just for “designers”

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  4. Accessible websites are the
    responsibility of the whole team

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  5. What is accessibility?

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  6. Accessibility is the degree to which a website is
    available to as many people as possible.

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  7. Empathy is integral to
    designing websites

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  8. It’s easier to create products for people
    who have the same needs as us

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  9. Successful products are created when
    someone is “scratching their own itch”

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  10. The problem with creating products to
    suit our own needs is that the tech
    industry is not diverse

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  11. diversity is the characteristics that make
    us up as individuals

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  12. and all of these characteristics give us
    unique needs, and unique outlooks

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  13. the more diverse a team, the more likely
    their product is to solve and serve the
    problems of a diverse audience

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  14. If we want accessible websites, we must
    have diverse teams

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  15. accessibility isn’t just about screen readers

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  16. Is it because we don’t understand who we’re
    trying to help?

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  17. Is it because we just don’t know what to do?

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  18. Is it because it’s too hard, and there’s too much
    to think about?

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  19. I’ve not got the answers

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  20. It’s not fair if the web isn’t accessible

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  21. Design decisions made in the name of
    accessibility will largely benefit everyone.

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  22. The business case
    £€$

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  23. http://www.wsi-ic.com/PConnolly/FileContent/improve_website.pdf
    Improvements in accessibility doubled Legal and
    General’s life insurance sales online

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  24. http://www.wsi-ic.com/PConnolly/FileContent/improve_website.pdf
    Improvements in accessibility increased Tesco’s
    grocery home delivery sales by £13M in 2005

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  25. http://www.wsi-ic.com/PConnolly/FileContent/improve_website.pdf
    Improvements in accessibility increased
    Virgin.net sales by 68%

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  26. €€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€
    €€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€
    €€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€

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  27. The four (main) types of disability that
    affect use of the web

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  28. None of these disabilities are completely
    black and white

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  29. mild
    moderate
    moderately severe
    severe
    profound
    hearing

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  30. astigmatism
    sensitivity
    colour blindness
    akinetopsia
    blindness
    eyesight

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  31. Visual make it easy to read

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  32. make it easy to hear
    Hearing

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  33. Motor make it easy to interact

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  34. Cognitive make it easy to
    understand and focus

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  35. Good accessibility is good usability

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  36. Squinting does not make an enjoyable reading
    experience

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  37. 1. Make text content easy to read.
    2. Ensure sensible font sizes.
    3. Don’t prevent the user from resizing
    the fonts themselves in the browser.

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  38. What’s that supposed to mean?

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  39. 1. Good copy is a part of good
    accessibility. Keep your text simple
    and your meaning clear.

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  40. Your screen isn’t the same as everybody else’s
    screens

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  41. 1. Use colour contrast tools to ensure
    your text is high-contrast enough.
    2. Beware of super-high contrast too.

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  42. Content hierarchy

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  43. This is a top-level heading
    This is a paragraph. It has some text in it. It’s a few
    sentences long. A lot of paragraphs look like this.
    This is a second level heading.
    This is a paragraph which has some links to other
    content and a button that allows you to take action.

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  44. This is a top-level heading
    This is a paragraph. It has some text in it. It’s a few sentences long.
    A lot of paragraphs look like this.
    This is a second level heading.
    This is a paragraph which has some links to other content and a
    button that allows you to take action

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  45. Randomly enlarging and colouring text does not
    make a hierarchy.

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  46. 1. Make the content structure clear
    and consistent.
    2. Use semantic headings, labels, lists
    and other relevant elements for
    your HTML or native controls.

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  47. Sometimes the links are the same
    colour and style as the rest of the text
    and you only find out it’s a link when
    you hover over it.

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  48. Sometimes the links are the same
    colour and style as the rest of the text
    and you only find out it’s a link when
    you hover over it.

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  49. Finding interactive elements should not be a
    game.

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  50. 1. Make buttons and interactive
    elements easyily distinguishable
    from non-interactive elements.
    2. Make links easy to recognise by
    using an underline.

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  51. Why should I click there?

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  52. 1. Use link text that makes sense out
    of context. Don’t use “click here”.
    2. Remember that not all your users
    are clicking.

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  53. alt=“funny auto-correct texts - Baby Crazy“

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  54. Unhelpful alt text has its place on XKCD

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  55. 1. Provide text alternatives for images
    that helps a user understand the
    context of the image.

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  56. No, I don’t want to listen to your podcast or
    watch your video tutorial. Give me text!

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  57. 1. Provide text transcripts for audio.
    2. Provide subtitles for video.

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  58. 1. Use JavaScript with care and load it
    in a sensible place.
    2. If your web site or app needs
    JavaScript, ensure you use WAI
    ARIA to guide assistive
    technologies.

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  59. Navigation and way-finding

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  60. The days of flash are over, stop punishing me
    with your artsy navigation.

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  61. 1. Provide consistent ways to help
    users navigate, find content, and
    determine where they are.

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  62. Laura
    Kalbag
    [email protected]
    First name
    Last name
    Email address

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  63. Don’t make me guess what and where the
    error is.

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  64. Wait for me!

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  65. 1. Give users enough time to read and
    use content
    2. Try not to distract users from their
    goals with unstoppable animations

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  66. I need proof that accessible sites aren’t
    just ugly

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  67. Consider accessibility at every point of planning. It is
    functionality, content hierarchy, copy, visual design and
    code.

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  68. Accessibility as default

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  69. Accessibility is easy to consider
    once you start caring about it.

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  70. Laura Kalbag
    @laurakalbag @indie https://ind.ie

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