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Intro to UX

Laura Kalbag
February 04, 2016

Intro to UX

From a panel at Learning Technologies in London, February 2016

Laura Kalbag

February 04, 2016
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  1. 1 We can get a better understanding of user experience by looking at lifts.
    2 Some of their interfaces just leave us confused. We need to go to a floor, but we
    have no idea where to start.
    3 Some interfaces present their buttons in a different order from what we expect.
    Are we descending underground?

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  2. Mike Licht CC BY-SA 2.0
    4 Some interfaces are designed in a way that misleads us, resulting in the need for
    “hacks” and re-labelling.
    5 Some interfaces make it unclear what is a label and what is a button.
    Clive Darra CC BY-SA 2.0
    6 For some reason, calculator interfaces are very popular in lifts. What happens if I
    try to go to floor 5-2? Or floor 6.8?

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  3. T P CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
    7 They can update the calculator interface, but it’s still a calculator interface. What
    does the star button do?
    8 Some interfaces give you the option to close the doors, and open the doors, and
    close the doors… harder? And open the doors… more?
    9 Some interfaces are beautifully laid out aesthetically but in a way that does not
    assist the person using them.

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  4. 10 Some interfaces result in us hitting the alarm button when we meant to go to the
    first floor.
    11 This interface is probably one of the better lift interfaces I’ve seen…
    12 1. The buttons are clearly laid out and labelled according to the corresponding
    floors, in sequential order.

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  5. 13 2. The two types of buttons are clearly separated by a reasonable amount of
    space, to avoid confusion.
    14 3. And there’s a subtle touch of detail in the colouring of the door buttons. Green
    means “go,” and yellow means “take care, you might shut someone in the door.”
    designing for purpose
    15 This interface is designing for purpose. It is understanding its context within the
    space, and the people who will be using it. It is designed accordingly.

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  6. UX = user eXperience design
    16 As the user eXperience title would suggest, experience design is focusing on the
    experience of the individual.
    user
    17 We may use the term “user“…
    user
    18 But the only other industry that predominantly uses the term “user” is the drug
    industry.

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  7. don’t create addictive design, create
    design that provides real value
    19 We don’t want to create addictive design, we want to create design that provides
    real value to people. Not a design that manipulates you into using it.
    experience design
    20 That is why we prefer to call it “experience design.”
    empower individuals
    21 This is design that empowers individuals, leaving them with more power than they
    had before they used it.

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  8. design for ourselves first
    22 An important part of experience design is designing for ourselves first. We best
    understand our own needs from a product. When we design for somebody else,
    we are usually making assumptions about what that person needs.
    diverse organisations create
    products for diverse audiences
    23 But what about designing for wider audiences that contain people not
    represented in our organisations? That is why we need diverse organisations.
    Diverse organisations designing for themselves create products for diverse
    audiences.
    existing business goals
    don’t matter
    24 When focusing on experience design, our existing business goals don’t matter. We
    don’t need old rules.

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  9. providing a great experience
    is a differentiating factor
    25 Providing a great experience is a differentiating factor in our products, and that is
    why people will want to use them, and that is how we make a business from them.
    Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
    26 You may be familiar with Maslow’s Hierarchy of human Needs…
    Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
    physiological
    27 It starts with a foundation of satisfying our physiological needs. Before we can do
    anything, we need to have food, and sleep…

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  10. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
    physiological
    safety
    28 Once we’ve satisfied those physiological needs, we can try to make ourselves safe.
    We need shelter, and not to be eaten by predators.
    Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
    physiological
    safety
    love/belonging
    29 Once we’re safe, we can form relationships, societies. We can achieve love and
    belonging.
    Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
    physiological
    safety
    love/belonging
    esteem
    30 After love and belonging comes esteem. A belief in ourselves.

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  11. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
    physiological
    safety
    love/belonging
    esteem
    self-
    actualisation
    31 And once all of those needs are satisfied, we can achieve self-actualisation. We can
    find our place in the world, and make plans.
    a great experience cannot
    stand alone
    32 Like each layer in the hierarchy of human needs, a great experience cannot stand
    alone.
    a great experience must be
    built on a foundation of
    respect for the individual
    33 A great experience must be built on a foundation of respect for the individual,
    otherwise it is hollow. It is fooling the individual to enjoy themselves without
    providing them with any true value.

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  12. 34 At Ind.ie, we’ve created our own version of the hierarchy for ethical design.
    decentralised, private, open,
    interoperable, accessible,
    secure & sustainable
    35 The foundation of a product must be decentralised, private, open, interoperable,
    accessible, secure, and sustainable…
    respects human rights
    decentralised, private, open,
    interoperable, accessible,
    secure & sustainable
    36 This is how we design products that respect human rights.
    It’s a strong foundation.

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  13. if a product is inaccessible
    to some, it cannot be a great
    experience for all
    37 If a product is inaccessible to some people, by its definition, it cannot be a great
    experience for all.
    if a product isn’t
    sustainable, it isn’t worth
    the individual’s effort
    38 If a product isn’t sustainable. If it isn’t backed by a business model that has
    longevity, it isn’t worth the individual’s effort. Why invest time in a product when it
    might not be around tomorrow?
    functional,
    convenient & reliable
    respects human rights
    decentralised, private, open,
    interoperable, accessible,
    secure & sustainable
    39 On top of that, the next layer, is that our product is functional, convenient and
    reliable…

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  14. functional,
    convenient & reliable
    respects human rights
    respects human effort
    decentralised, private, open,
    interoperable, accessible,
    secure & sustainable
    40 Because that respects human effort.
    functional,
    convenient & reliable
    delightful
    respects human rights
    respects human effort
    decentralised, private, open,
    interoperable, accessible,
    secure & sustainable
    41 And then we can layer the delight on top…
    functional,
    convenient & reliable
    delightful
    respects human rights
    respects human effort
    respects human experience
    decentralised, private, open,
    interoperable, accessible,
    secure & sustainable
    42 because that respects human experience.

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  15. functional,
    convenient & reliable
    decentralised, private, open,
    interoperable, accessible,
    secure & sustainable
    delightful
    respects human rights
    respects human effort
    respects human experience
    The 3 Rs of Ethical Design
    43 At Ind.ie, we call this the 3 Rs of Ethical Design. Find out more at https://ind.ie/
    ethical-design
    …that is how to make
    a great experience
    44 That is how to make a great experience.
    …that is how to make
    a great experience
    45 Thanks for reading :) — Laura Kalbag https://ind.ie @laurakalbag @indie

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