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Peer Progress and Regulation 2.0

Nick Grossman
February 07, 2013

Peer Progress and Regulation 2.0

Presentation given at the Princeton Center for Information Technology Policy.

Nick Grossman

February 07, 2013
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  1. Peer Progress and Regulation 2.0
    Nick Grossman
    Princeton Center for Information Technology Policy | Feb 7, 2013

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  2. me, me, me
    Hi, I’m Nick. I am the “activist in residence” at Union Sq Ventures and a visiting scholarat the MIT Media Lab
    in the Center for Civic Media. I work with internet companies and public interest groups to explore public
    policy and regulatory approaches that support innovation. My background is in the “civic tech” space.

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  3. me, me, me
    Hi, I’m Nick. I am the “activist in residence” at Union Sq Ventures and a visiting scholarat the MIT Media Lab
    in the Center for Civic Media. I work with internet companies and public interest groups to explore public
    policy and regulatory approaches that support innovation. My background is in the “civic tech” space.

    View full-size slide

  4. me, me, me
    Hi, I’m Nick. I am the “activist in residence” at Union Sq Ventures and a visiting scholarat the MIT Media Lab
    in the Center for Civic Media. I work with internet companies and public interest groups to explore public
    policy and regulatory approaches that support innovation. My background is in the “civic tech” space.

    View full-size slide

  5. me, me, me
    Hi, I’m Nick. I am the “activist in residence” at Union Sq Ventures and a visiting scholarat the MIT Media Lab
    in the Center for Civic Media. I work with internet companies and public interest groups to explore public
    policy and regulatory approaches that support innovation. My background is in the “civic tech” space.

    View full-size slide

  6. me, me, me
    Hi, I’m Nick. I am the “activist in residence” at Union Sq Ventures and a visiting scholarat the MIT Media Lab
    in the Center for Civic Media. I work with internet companies and public interest groups to explore public
    policy and regulatory approaches that support innovation. My background is in the “civic tech” space.

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  7. I may also be a sign of the coming Apocalypse, or the anti-Christ himself. I prefer to think of myself as
    someone who studies infrastructure - both real-world and virtual - and its effects on creativity and vibrancy,
    and also looks for new ways for individuals to use tech & media to engage with civic issues.

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  8. photo: http://72ppi.us/archives/2010/mar/14/times-square/
    I describe myself as a “student of cities and the internet” -- today I’d like to talk about the increasing
    intersection of the two and what that means for public policy and regulation.

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  9. Together, connected,
    we can innovate,
    solve problems in new ways,
    and prosper.

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  10. Modern humans
    -2mm
    Looking back at the history of technological innovations, the the arrival of peer production through networks is
    more profound than we might think.

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  11. Agriculture
    -2mm -10,000
    Looking back at the history of technological innovations, the the arrival of peer production through networks is
    more profound than we might think.

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  12. Printing Press
    -2mm -10,000 1440
    Looking back at the history of technological innovations, the the arrival of peer production through networks is
    more profound than we might think.

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  13. Dutch East India Company
    -2mm -10,000 1440 1600
    Looking back at the history of technological innovations, the the arrival of peer production through networks is
    more profound than we might think.

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  14. Industrial Revolution
    -2mm -10,000 1440 1600 1750
    Looking back at the history of technological innovations, the the arrival of peer production through networks is
    more profound than we might think.

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  15. The Rise of the Corporate Form
    -2mm -10,000 1440 1600 1750 1855
    Looking back at the history of technological innovations, the the arrival of peer production through networks is
    more profound than we might think.

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  16. The Internet
    -2mm -10,000 1440 1600 1750 1855 1980
    Looking back at the history of technological innovations, the the arrival of peer production through networks is
    more profound than we might think.

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  17. The Rise of Networks
    -2mm -10,000 1440 1600 1750 1855 1980 2000
    Looking back at the history of technological innovations, the the arrival of peer production through networks is
    more profound than we might think.

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  18. -2mm -10,000 1440 1600 1750 1855 1980 2000
    It’s easy to think of this as simply a new mode of communication
    Looking back at the history of technological innovations, the the arrival of peer production through networks is
    more profound than we might think.

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  19. -2mm -10,000 1440 1600 1750 1855 1980 2000
    But it’s actually a profound way of organizing work
    Looking back at the history of technological innovations, the the arrival of peer production through networks is
    more profound than we might think.

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  20. in the age of oil,
    automobiles, and mass
    production,
    bureaucratic hierarchy
    became the dominant
    way to organize work.

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  21. in the age of oil,
    automobiles, and mass
    production,
    bureaucratic hierarchy
    became the dominant
    way to organize work.

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  22. in the age of oil,
    automobiles, and mass
    production,
    bureaucratic hierarchy
    became the dominant
    way to organize work.
    information

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  23. in the age of oil,
    automobiles, and mass
    production,
    bureaucratic hierarchy
    became the dominant
    way to organize work.
    information decisions

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  24. But now…
    seriously weird
    (and wonderful)
    things happen when
    people are connected

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  25. Source: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2010/social-networks-health-0903.html
    peerprogress.is/architected
    But “networked” is not a monolithic term -- every network has its own architecture, which affects its ability to
    accomplish work and its power dynamics. The above diagram shows that in an MIT health study, clustered,
    redundant networks were more effective at changing behavior than scattered networks.

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  26. peer networks are creating
    fundamentally new opportunities in every sector.
    health finance energy music publishing
    transportation education commerce
    workforce manufacturing food real estate government
    etc. etc. etc.
    peerprogress.is/everywhere

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  27. peerprogress.is/everywhere
    source: http://blog.unstash.com/todays-peer-to-peer-economy/
    This diagram illustrates the recent proliferation of network-oriented platforms, which span every sector.

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  28. peerprogress.is/health
    Asthmapolis takes a networked
    approach to a major health issue,
    empowering patients and
    informing the public health
    discussion

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  29. peerprogress.is/finance
    Kickstarter has unlocked new
    funding streams for creative
    endeavors, and has created
    the market for crowd-funding
    in other sectors

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  30. peerprogress.is/energy
    Opower has saved its users
    2 terawatt hours ($220M)
    through its behavior-based
    efficiency network

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  31. peerprogress.is/layered
    The traditional study of “internet policy” has focused on information issues -- the core infrastructure of the web.
    Increasingly, we’re seeing real-world policy areas being tested as web-powered networks engage in more and
    more real-world activities.

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  32. Intellectual Property
    Privacy & Surveillance
    Governance & Standards
    Network Policy
    Open Data
    Wireless Spectrum
    peerprogress.is/layered
    The traditional study of “internet policy” has focused on information issues -- the core infrastructure of the web.
    Increasingly, we’re seeing real-world policy areas being tested as web-powered networks engage in more and
    more real-world activities.

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  33. Housing
    Transportation
    Health
    Education
    Intellectual Property
    Privacy & Surveillance
    Governance & Standards
    Network Policy
    Open Data
    Wireless Spectrum
    Social Services
    Science
    Finance
    etc.
    peerprogress.is/layered
    The traditional study of “internet policy” has focused on information issues -- the core infrastructure of the web.
    Increasingly, we’re seeing real-world policy areas being tested as web-powered networks engage in more and
    more real-world activities.

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  34. peer progress and
    tech policy

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  35. photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/romtomtom/4141759954
    peerprogress.is/safe-harbors
    The notion of “safe harbors” has been critical to the success of peer networks on the internet. Section 230 of
    the Communications Decency Act provides safe harbor for sites that deal in user-generated digital content.

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  36. "We estimate that collectively we
    served and informed 10 times as
    many individuals by embracing an
    open strategy. That’s hundreds of
    thousands of people.”
    NYC Chief Digital Officer Rachel Haot,
    on opening up storm shelter data to the network
    peerprogress.is/open-data
    The recent movement towards more publicly accessible and machine-readable data -- often coming from
    government sources -- has laid a foundation for networked collaboration and innovation.

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  37. spectrum
    peerprogress.is/open-innovation
    This diagram shows frequency allocations of radio spectrum in the United States. The unlicensed segments of
    radio spectrum have born innovations such as Bluetooth and WiFi.

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  38. http://theglobalplaybook.com/formlabs-form-1-3d-printer/
    peerprogress.is/complicated
    Recently, Formlabs -- a 3D printing company that raised over $1M on Kickstarter, was sued for infringing
    patents held by 3D Systems. Kickstarter was also sued, for facilitating the infringement.

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  39. peer progress and
    real-world policy
    aka, the new intermediaries

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  40. peerprogress.is/education
    As web-powered networks extend into more real-world sectors, they are often met with resistance from
    incumbents - both in the public and private sectors. Both because they often present low-cost, disruptive
    alternatives, and because they often operate in legal gray areas or don’t fit within existing categories.

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  41. peerprogress.is/finance

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  42. peerprogress.is/travel
    Airbnb, the peer-to-peer apartment rental service, has confronted regulatory challenges in many cities. Cities
    are working to understand the service and its impacts on neighborhoods and the economy.

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  43. lyft/sidecar
    peerprogress.is/transportation
    There are many new innovations in network-driven transportation services, and nearly all of them have
    encountered difficulties in establishing their regulatory environment. Lyft & Sidecar (ride sharing) have faced a
    ban in California; Uber & Hailo (networked taxis) have had difficulty in many American cities.

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  44. regulation 2.0?
    So… given that we have many “web 2.0” companies operating in a “1.0” (pre-digital, pre-network, pre-big data)
    policy environment, what are some of the biggest issues we’re struggling with?

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  45. Service provider Information provider
    The new intermediaries
    As did user-generated digital content platforms in the 1990s and 2000s, todays real-world peer networks are
    not yet clearly defined as “direct service providers” or conversely as simply “information providers” (or
    messaging providers). Where this lands will have big impacts for liability, regulation, and information.

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  46. TRUST
    One way of looking at this is in terms of how we build trust. Peer networks (beginning with Ebay) have
    developed advanced internal trust systems to protect buyers and sellers. Could a similar approach, which
    makes use of the vast data produced by these networks, work for public sector regulation?

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  47. TRUST
    1.0
    BEFORE THE FACT
    One way of looking at this is in terms of how we build trust. Peer networks (beginning with Ebay) have
    developed advanced internal trust systems to protect buyers and sellers. Could a similar approach, which
    makes use of the vast data produced by these networks, work for public sector regulation?

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  48. TRUST
    Bureaucracy
    Friction
    Permission
    1.0
    BEFORE THE FACT
    One way of looking at this is in terms of how we build trust. Peer networks (beginning with Ebay) have
    developed advanced internal trust systems to protect buyers and sellers. Could a similar approach, which
    makes use of the vast data produced by these networks, work for public sector regulation?

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  49. TRUST
    Bureaucracy
    Friction
    Permission
    1.0
    BEFORE THE FACT
    2.0
    AFTER THE FACT
    One way of looking at this is in terms of how we build trust. Peer networks (beginning with Ebay) have
    developed advanced internal trust systems to protect buyers and sellers. Could a similar approach, which
    makes use of the vast data produced by these networks, work for public sector regulation?

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  50. TRUST
    Bureaucracy
    Friction
    Permission
    Transparency
    Accountability
    Innovation
    1.0
    BEFORE THE FACT
    2.0
    AFTER THE FACT
    One way of looking at this is in terms of how we build trust. Peer networks (beginning with Ebay) have
    developed advanced internal trust systems to protect buyers and sellers. Could a similar approach, which
    makes use of the vast data produced by these networks, work for public sector regulation?

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  51. Thanks!
    [email protected] | @nickgrossman | nickgrossman.is

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