Creating Change without Authority

Creating Change without Authority

Often, we look at the world around us, and we find we wish it were better. But the parts that we most wish to change don't always have to do as we say. That does not, however, mean that we are powerless.

In this keynote, we explore how small actions, supporting ourselves, and broadening our perspectives, we can enable us to create change—even without the official authority to do so. By the end, you'll not only have tactics to try, but will feel it is possible to achieve what you imagine.

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Veronica Erb

March 05, 2018
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Transcript

  1. “The Making of the J. B. Grinnell Class” Daniel Kisslinger,

    Grace Gallagher, Kesho Scott Mathew Brady, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
  2. “The Making of the J. B. Grinnell Class” Daniel Kisslinger,

    Grace Gallagher, Kesho Scott Mathew Brady, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
  3. Mathew Brady, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons “The Making of

    the J. B. Grinnell Class” Daniel Kisslinger, Grace Gallagher, Kesho Scott
  4. Mathew Brady, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons “The Making of

    the J. B. Grinnell Class” Daniel Kisslinger, Grace Gallagher, Kesho Scott
  5. Mathew Brady, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons “The Making of

    the J. B. Grinnell Class” Daniel Kisslinger, Grace Gallagher, Kesho Scott
  6. * Mathew Brady, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons “The Making

    of the J. B. Grinnell Class” Daniel Kisslinger, Grace Gallagher, Kesho Scott
  7. What does it mean to be a change maker?

  8. Creating Change without Authority Veronica Erb | Designing for Digital

    2018 @verbistheword
  9. =

  10. None
  11. What does it mean to be a change maker?

  12. Inspire change Sustainably Together

  13. Take small actions Support myself Broaden my perspective

  14. Take small actions

  15. “The most common way people give up their power is

    by thinking they don’t have any.” — Alice Walker
  16. None
  17. None
  18. None
  19. Remote work culture

  20. None
  21. None
  22. I acted in a way that wasn’t normal to make

    it normal.
  23. Inclusive remote culture

  24. Inclusive remote culture

  25. Inclusive remote culture Address directly

  26. Inclusive remote culture Address directly Opt out

  27. Inclusive remote culture Address directly Divert attention Opt out

  28. Address directly Address indirectly Divert attention Opt out Inclusive remote

    culture
  29. Address directly Address indirectly Divert attention Opt out Work remotely

    myself Inclusive remote culture
  30. This. Is. Hard.

  31. Take small actions

  32. Support myself

  33. “It is untenable to go through life as an exposed

    wound.” — Roxane Gay “The Illusion of Safety/The Safety of Illusion” Bad Feminist
  34. Support myself ?

  35. Support thoughts, relationships, emotion

  36. Externalize my thoughts

  37. Habitual thought capture to understand and decide what to do

  38. None
  39. None
  40. None
  41. Address directly Address indirectly Divert attention Opt out Understand and

    decide what to do Externalize my thoughts
  42. We need to externalize our thoughts so we can decide

    what to change and how to make it happen.
  43. Externalize my thoughts

  44. Build my relationships

  45. Regular two-way human interaction to help make and evaluate change

  46. None
  47. None
  48. “In 2006, a survey in the American Sociological Review famously

    reported... that the number of Americans who felt they had no confidants at all had more than doubled, from 10 [percent in 1985] to 24.6 percent [in 2004].” — Jennifer Senior, All Joy and No Fun
  49. None
  50. Address directly Address indirectly Divert attention Opt out Make and

    evaluate change Build my relationships
  51. By building communities around ourselves, we can stay connected and

    motivated.
  52. Build my relationships

  53. Release my emotion

  54. Habitual emotional release to be able to take small actions

  55. None
  56. None
  57. spire.io

  58. spire.io

  59. Address directly Address indirectly Divert attention Opt out Be able

    to take small actions Release my emotion
  60. We need to release our stress so that we can

    live healthy lives and create change.
  61. Release my emotion

  62. Support thoughts, relationships, emotion

  63. Address directly Address indirectly Divert attention Opt out Take small

    actions Care for myself
  64. Address directly Address indirectly Divert attention Opt out Inclusive remote

    culture Care for myself
  65. Support thoughts, relationships, emotion

  66. Support myself

  67. Broaden my perspective

  68. “If you want to make the world a better place

    \ Take a look at yourself, and then make a change” —Glen Ballard & Siedah Garrett, for Michael Jackson, “Man in the Mirror”
  69. As we create change, we gain power.

  70. None
  71. As we create change, we gain power.

  72. Avoid assimilating the compromises that we have made.

  73. ` Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader

    Ginsburg Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik Lynn Gilbert CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
  74. Lynn Gilbert CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons Notorious RBG:

    The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik
  75. Lynn Gilbert CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons Notorious RBG:

    The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik
  76. Lynn Gilbert CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons Notorious RBG:

    The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik
  77. Avoid assimilating the compromises that we have made.

  78. Train ourselves to manage our biases.

  79. Maanvi Singh “So You Flunked A Racism Test. Now What?”

    npr.org
  80. “And, voila! When participants took the same implicit-bias tests after

    the nap, they were up to 50 percent less biased.” — Maanvi Singh, “So You Flunked A Racism Test. Now What?” npr.org
  81. None
  82. Address directly Address indirectly Divert attention Opt out Work together

    Expand my perspectives
  83. Train ourselves to manage our biases.

  84. By noticing my power, avoiding assimilation, and managing my bias,

    I support the change we each seek.
  85. Create change without authority

  86. What does it mean to be a change maker?

  87. Inspire change Sustainably Together

  88. Take small actions Support myself Broaden my perspective

  89. Take small actions Support thoughts, relationships, emotion Broaden my perspective

  90. Mathew Brady, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons * “The Making

    of the J. B. Grinnell Class” Daniel Kisslinger, Grace Gallagher, Kesho Scott
  91. Address directly Address indirectly Divert attention Opt out Inclusive remote

    culture Externalize my thoughts Build my relationships Release my emotion Expand my perspectives Be able to take small actions Understand and decide what to do Make and evaluate change
  92. Lynn Gilbert CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons Notorious RBG:

    The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik
  93. Even if when we don’t have a budget, a title,

    or a team, we can create change.
  94. With persistent small actions, self-care, and a broad mind, we

    can change the way things work.
  95. Together, we can even change the things that we may

    have thought “are just the way they are.”
  96. Veronica Erb @verbistheword Creating Change without Authority Designing for Digital

    2018
  97. Thank you to all the people who supported this presentation!

    Anthony Pitale, Dan Newman, Erica Liao, Esmé Middaugh, Ijeoma Ezeonyebuchi, Janeen Williamson, Julie Rogers, Justin Lucas, Kaytee Nesmith, Libby Bawcombe, Liz Danzico, Mary Glendinning, Megan Williams, Tommy O'Keefe, Wanyu Zhang, Erin Teare Martin, Lauren Bracey Shiedt, McCaul Baggett, Anne Leyh, Millie Erb, Ron Erb, Tony Pitale, Durrie Bouscaren, LA Johnson, Sarah Knight, Willy Tekeu, Jason Alderman, Elissa Frankle Olinsky, and many more
  98. Veronica Erb @verbistheword Creating Change without Authority Designing for Digital

    2018