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From Delinquent to Star Student

From Delinquent to Star Student

https://aaron.kr/content/talks/from-delinquent-to-star-student/

Presented at: Jeonju North-Jeolla KOTESOL 2014 Regional Conference

How do you teach students English? What if you didn’t have to teach them? What if they were motivated to learn on their own? This presentation will consider the psychology of motivation as it relates to second language learning. There are many elements that combine to give us (or our students) success in second language learning. We will look at:

• The difference between Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation
• Breaking out of your Comfort Zone and finding your Passion
• Neurological Cravings, Habit Loops, and Behavior Reinforcing Rewards
• The difference between Progress and Perfection
• How to stick to your Schedule by reducing your Scope
• How to be a better Teacher by being Taught

I hope to be able to give much good food for thought as well as some practical tips and suggestions to put into practice TODAY. Some of these suggestions may appear to be quite radical, but other suggestions will give very actionable steps for creating Habits, increasing Passion, and sticking to a Schedule.

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Aaron Snowberger

April 12, 2014
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Transcript

  1. None
  2. From Delinquent to Star Student: My Personal Journey Toward Second-Language

    Learning Motivation Aaron Snowberger
  3. Helpful Teaching Professional Personal

  4. My Area(s) of Interest 1. Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic Motivation 2.

    Comfort Zone vs. Passion 3. Neurological Cravings & Habit Loops 4. Progress vs. Perfection 5. Schedule vs. Scope 6. Good Teachers are Taught 1. Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic Motivation 2. Comfort Zone vs. Passion 3. Neurological Cravings & Habit Loops 4. Progress vs. Perfection 5. Schedule vs. Scope 6. Good Teachers are Taught
  5. My Area(s) of Interest 1. Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic Motivation 2.

    Comfort Zone vs. Passion 3. Neurological Cravings & Habit Loops 4. Progress vs. Perfection 5. Schedule vs. Scope 6. Good Teachers are Taught 1. Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic Motivation 2. Comfort Zone vs. Passion 3. Neurological Cravings & Habit Loops 4. Progress vs. Perfection 5. Schedule vs. Scope 6. Good Teachers are Taught
  6. ME

  7. My Story How I Got Here What You Can Do

  8. My Story

  9. A Little Background

  10. A Little Background

  11. None
  12. www.keytokorean.com Language Learning Motivation + Korean Language Resources

  13. www.keytokorean.com Language Learning Motivation + Korean Language Resources

  14. A Different Picture

  15. A Different Picture

  16. A Different Picture From 4.0 => 3.186 3 Fs (retakes)

    + 1 D in a Major class
  17. A Different Picture From 4.0 => 3.186 3 Fs (retakes)

    + 1 D in a Major class
  18. None
  19. Change of Motivation = Change of Attitude = Change of

    Behavior
  20. How I Got Here

  21. Success = Motivation + Habits Motivation Habits

  22. Motivation

  23. Motivation 1.0 Motivation 2.0 Motivation 3.0 ~ Primal creatures ~

    Carrots & Sticks ~ Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic
  24. Intrinsic (Pure Enjoyment) Extrinsic (Carrot + Stick)

  25. Learning an Instrument Open Source Software Online Forums Entrepreneurship Learning

    a Language*
  26. A “Day job” Bonuses + Commissions MONEY Standardized Testing Learning

    a Language*
  27. Extrinsic Reward Punishment

  28. Intrinsic Autonomy Mastery Purpose

  29. Autonomy (ROWE) Task Time Team Technique

  30. Mastery

  31. Mastery It’s impossible to fully realize, which makes it simultaneously

    frustrating and alluring.
  32. Purpose “What brings meaning to a job is not the

    job itself, but what we bring to it.”
  33. None
  34. None
  35. Reference Levels (Our Comfort Zones) ~ “Acceptable Range” ~ Minimum

    Set Point ~ Maximum Set Point ~ Errors “Something has to change.”
  36. Habits

  37. None
  38. Trigger (Cue) Routine (Behavior) Reward (Satisfaction) Craving

  39. None
  40. None
  41. Remake a Habit 1. Determine your Craving 2. Identify your

    Trigger 3. Change the Routine 4. Maintain the Reward 1. Determine your Passion (WHY) 2. Create a Trigger 3. Decide upon a Routine 4. Reward yourself Form a New One
  42. Remake a Habit 1. Determine your Craving 2. Identify your

    Trigger 3. Change the Routine 4. Maintain the Reward 1. Determine your Passion (WHY) 2. Create a Trigger 3. Decide upon a Routine 4. Reward yourself Form a New One
  43. Reduce Scope in Favor of Schedule

  44. “The truth about success is as simple as this: 1.

    Not 5,000 things 2. A half-dozen things done 5,000 times.”
  45. What You Can Do

  46. Motivation in the Classroom: 9 Ideas from Dan Pink’s Drive

  47. #1: Apply the 3-Part Type-I Test 1. Am I offering

    students AUTONOMY over the when and how of this work? 2. Does this task promote MASTERY by offering something novel and engaging (as opposed to rote reformulation)? 3. Do my students understand the PURPOSE? The “Big Picture” of this assignment in the class?
  48. #2: Have a “FedEx Day” Overnight Delivery.

  49. #3: Try DIY Report Cards 1. Students write down learning

    goals at the beginning of the semester 2. Students write their own report cards and a 1-2 paragraph assessment of their progress at the end 3. Then, show the teacher’s report card and discuss how they are doing on their path toward MASTERY
  50. #4: Stop offering “If-Then” Rewards IF THEN NOW THAT

  51. #5: Offer Praise...The Right Way 1. Praise effort and strategy,

    not intelligence 2. Make praise specific (no generalities) 3. Praise in private (no award ceremonies) 4. Offer praise only when there’s good reason (be sincere)
  52. #6: Help the see the “Big Picture” Kids think: Why

    am I learning this? How is it relevant to my world? 1. Reading 2. Writing 3. Arithmetic 4. Relevance
  53. #7: Investigate Type-I Schools 1. Big Picture Learning 2. Sudbury

    Valley School 3. The Tinkering School 4. Puget Sound Community School 5. Montessori Schools (Children have natural curiosity & innate desire to learn)
  54. #8: Learn from the “Unschoolers” They promote autonomy by allowing

    youngsters to decide what they learn and how they learn it. They encourage mastery by allowing children to spend as long as they’d like and to go as deep as they desire on the topics that interest them.
  55. #9: Turn Students into Teachers

  56. #9: Turn Students into Teachers Want to learn something? Teach

    it.
  57. Habits in the Classroom

  58. Let students know that their Habits are a big determiner

    in their Final grades. “I never saw a student on a smartphone get an A in my class.” #1: The truth about Grading
  59. #2: Help Them Create Good Habits

  60. #3: Teach them the Power of: 1. Daily Habits 2.

    Consistency 3. Momentum 4. The Compound Effect
  61. Educate Yourself

  62. #1: Want to read more?

  63. #2: Learn some Korean 1. Empathize with your students 2.

    Understand WHY students continually make the same kinds of mistakes 3. Anticipate student mistakes before them make them (and address them) 4. Being a student makes you a better teacher 5. Check student understanding of vocab & grammar 6. It will increase their interest in YOUR language
  64. None
  65. Questions or Comments?

  66. Questions or Comments? www.keytokorean.com/kotesol