Human Document Project - introduction, goals & a small project

3014362bc816c0e34f9bb270d226e31c?s=47 andreas manz
September 13, 2012

Human Document Project - introduction, goals & a small project

... talk given at Stanford. Human Document Project workshop, September 13-14, 2012.

3014362bc816c0e34f9bb270d226e31c?s=128

andreas manz

September 13, 2012
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Transcript

  1. introduction goals & a small project introduction, goals & a

    small project Andreas Manz, Jukyun Park b k KIST Europe, Saarbrücken Germany
  2. „the human document project“ p j goal t d 1

    d t b t h •to produce 1 document about human culture, science, arts etc. culture, science, arts etc. •to preserve it for 1 million years
  3. assumption 1 ssu p o 1 million years ahead can

    be extrapolated can be extrapolated for geology for astronomy for astronomy
  4. a Million years? a Million years? 19/36

  5. a Million years? a Million years? 19/36

  6. a Million years? a Million years? 19/36

  7. a planetary clock ? a planetary clock ? 37 628

    AD occ ltation of Sat rn b J piter 37,628 AD occultation of Saturn by Jupiter 36,774 AD occultation of Saturn by Jupiter 30,121 AD occultation of Saturn by Jupiter 23 350 AD occultation of Saturn by Jupiter 23,350 AD occultation of Saturn by Jupiter 21,303 AD occultation of Saturn by Jupiter 13,738 AD occultation of Saturn by Jupiter 13 340 AD occultation of Saturn by Jupiter 13,340 AD occultation of Saturn by Jupiter 8,674 AD occultation of Saturn by Jupiter 7,541 AD occultation of Saturn by Jupiter (2x within a few months) 19/36
  8. a planetary clock ? a planetary clock ? 571,741 AD

    simultaneous transit Venus + Earth seen from Mars 224,508 AD near-simultaneous transit of Venus and Mercury 69,163 AD simultaneous Venus + Mercury transit 38,172 AD transit of Uranus seen from Neptune 15,790 AD simultaneous annular solar eclipse and transit of Mercury 15,232 AD simultaneous total solar eclipse and transit of Venus  13,425 AD near-simultaneous transit of Venus and Mercury 11 575 AD i lt l l li d t it f M 11,575 AD simultaneous annular solar eclipse and transit of Mercury 11,268 AD simultaneous total solar eclipse and transit of Mercury 10,663 AD simultaneous total solar eclipse and transit of Mercury 9 966 AD simultaneous total solar eclipse and transit of Mercury 9,966 AD simultaneous total solar eclipse and transit of Mercury 9,622 AD simultaneous annular solar eclipse and transit of Mercury 9,361 AD simultaneous annular solar eclipse and transit of Mercury 8 059 AD simultaneous annular solar eclipse and transit of Mercury 8,059 AD simultaneous annular solar eclipse and transit of Mercury 6,757 AD simultaneous solar eclipse and transit of Mercury -15,607 BC simultaneous total solar eclipse and transit of Venus  -90 109 BC near-simultaneous transit of Venus and Mercury 19/36 90,109 BC near simultaneous transit of Venus and Mercury -373,173 BC simultaneous Venus + Mercury transit
  9. assumption 2 ssu p o 1 million years back is

    similar to y 1 million years ahead for biology
  10. many Million years many Million years 19/36

  11. 1 million years back 1 million years back Homo neanderthalensis

    Homo sapiens Homo heidelbergensis Homo habilis Homo erectus Paranthropus Ardipithecus Australopithecus 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 million years
  12. in 1 million years o ye s a biological species

    may have evolved into another (similar) one evolved into another (similar) one likelihood nearly 100% Homo sapiens may no longer exist Homo sapiens may no longer exist
  13. assumption 3 ssu p o 3 the future could be

    much longer than the past the past for intelligent life for Hominid species for Hominid species
  14. 1 million years back 1 million years back 5 4

    3 2 1 0 venus statuettes, cave paintings pottery pottery stone axes pebble tools
  15. „the human document project“ p j Lespugue, upper paleolithic, 25,000

    B.C.
  16. „the human document project“ p j Lascaux cave, upper paleolithic,

    14,000 B.C.
  17. „the human document project“ p j Tartaria tablets, 5,500 B.C.

    Jiahu symbols, 6,000 B.C.
  18. „the human document project“ p j Epic of Gilgamesh p

    g begins with instructions on how to find a box of copper ow to d a bo o coppe inside a foundation stone in the great walls of Uruk 3,000 B.C.
  19. the “culture record” of Hominids has some similarity to the

    fossil record governed by mechanisms of preservation and corrosion / destruction
  20. assumption 4 ssu p o we tend to underestimate Hominid

    intelligence past and future intelligence, past and future
  21. „the human document project“ p j Pioneer plaque 1972 Voyager

    CD 1977
  22. a small project s p ojec t i t d

    itt l t to introduce written language to a future reader to store it on solid material to store it on solid material to test processes of aging
  23. deep etching of monocrystalline silicon deep e c g o

    o oc ys e s co
  24. learning / definitions Lik R tt t Like Rosetta stone

  25. embedding it in amber e bedd g be resin source

    today Agathis australis (New Zealand) monomer: communic acid monomer: communic acid
  26. Language over the ages Question1: What does this say? Question1:

    What does this say? Answer: Human Document (Old English Runic alphabet, used until 10th century) How can we make our document ( g p , y) Answer: We have to teach our language understandable? Answer: We have to teach our language
  27. learning / definitions lik hild ’ l i like children’s

    learning
  28. Primary school textbooks Sound based English Sound-based Sino-graphs English Korean

    Korean 7/35
  29. Primary school textbooks Analyze • Children taught to read by

    using pictures B k f t hi h th h t d ( ith Analyze • Books focus on teaching how the characters sound (with teacher/parental assistance) Problems Children’s books do not teach the meaning of words Need external influences to assist learning Problems Need external influences to assist learning 8/35
  30. Dictionary Analyze • Collection of words W d d ib

    d b th d Analyze • Words are described by other words • Often used to help learn other languages Problems • First steps of learning very difficult Problems p g y (excellent as a 2nd step) 9/35
  31. Picture-based dictionary Example 호랑이털색은 녹슨 듯한 오렌지색 녹슨 호랑이 :

    털색은 녹슨 듯한 오렌지색, 녹슨 듯한 갈색, 몸 아래 쪽과 얼굴 일부분은 흰색 사자에 비해 일부분은 흰색 사자에 비해 얼굴이 작고 갈기가 없음. 온몸에 검은색 세로 줄무늬가 있음 One picture is worth a thousand words 10/35
  32. Picture-based dictionary Problems  U bl t l i ll

    d b i t l  Unable to explain all words by pictures alone  Inefficient, in terms of coverage Possible solution  Ontology: classification of words, and the relationships between h them 11/35
  33. Ontology Example 육식 동물: 동물을 먹이로 삼는 동물이다 동물 Enlarge

    the tree ith b i Animal with basic pictures 육식 동물 포유 동물 Mammal 어류 Fish 조류 Bird Predators Mammal Fish Bird 12/35
  34. Structure of the ontology earth Super class Super class Definition

    of a master class: 1. Objects that can be easily seen in nature without Master class (2) Master class (1) j y additional tools 2. Objects that might not change significantly even after 1 million years 1 million years 3. Contains threshold hierarchy, e.g. mammal class, bird class Slave class (1.1) Slave class (1.2) Slave class (2.1) Slave class (2.2) 13/35 Slave class (1 1 2)
  35. Structure of the ontology Example : Example : slave class

    (Human) ( ) live at create has believe know play create use Has Human 14/35
  36. Applying the ontology to a chip Super picture Master picture

    Slave picture  M t l picture which  Master classes  Unique objects (e.g Sun, Moon) picture which represents a current view of the Earth (e.g Sun, Moon)  Exceptions (e.g. cloud, are inside the master i t of the Earth humans, fire) 15/35 pictures
  37. Super picture design Super picture design Master i pictures Ontology

    t tree
  38. Contents of the l i slave pictures 1 Pi t

    d d t f "A i l” l 1. Pictures descendent from "Animal” super class 2 “Human” picture 2. Human picture 3. Master pictures with no slave classes p 17/36
  39. Contents of the l i slave pictures 1 Pi t

    d d t f "A i l” l 1. Pictures descendent from "Animal” super class 2 “Human” picture 2. Human picture 3. Master pictures with no slave classes p 18/36
  40. Contents of the l i slave pictures 1 Pi t

    d d t f "A i l” l 1. Pictures descendent from "Animal” super class 2 “Human” picture 2. Human picture 3. Master pictures with no slave classes p 19/36
  41. the mask layout the mask layout

  42. Chip fabrication: material Material : Silicon Reasons: Reasons:  Stable

    against temperature  Stable against chemicals g  Established micro fabrication methods  Youngs modulus & Knoop hardness is high 17/35
  43. Chip fabrication: photolithography Result Problem: Caused by the high density

    of th K h t the Korean characters 쀍 vs A Mask design Photo- XeF Etching Modification: 쀍 vs A (Cadence) lithography XeF2 Etching 18/35
  44. the wafer the wafer 19/36

  45. the wafer the wafer 19/36

  46. the wafer the wafer 19/36

  47. the wafer the wafer 19/36

  48. the wafer the wafer 19/36

  49. Causes of damage Type Possible occurrence Related parameter Er Friction

    Movement of chip or sand particles Speed & Force rosion Th Shock Occurence of fire Occurence of volcano Maximum temperature Fatigue Daily & annual Difference between maximum We Thermal Fatigue y temperature change and minimum temperature eathering Freezing Ice forming Minimum temperature Pressure Something can fall down over the wafer Applied pressure g Pressure Something can fall down over the wafer or an animal can walk over it Applied pressure Chemical Acid rain Concentration Temperature Chemical Acid rain Hydroxide round biochemical reaction etc Concentration Temperature
  50. Friction tests (1) • Sand blaster used for friction experiment

    (1) p ( ) nozzle chip Problem: Difficult to make a quantitative relation between sand particle Relationship between pressure and destruction velocity and the rate of destruction 21/35
  51. Friction tests (2) Friction tests (2) • Grinding machine used

    for friction experiment (2) • Two parameters investigated:  Effect of grinding speed with constant force (2 N) for 20s  Effect of force applied by grinding machine with constant speed (20,000 ) f 20 rpm) for 20 s 22/35
  52. Friction tests Friction tests (Constant force) (Constant force) Effect of

    grinding speed ( ) ( ) (constant force) Depth(µm) Depth = √(Ks × grinding speed) K 129 10-12 Applied speed (rpm) 23/35 Depth = √(Ks × grinding speed) Ks = 129 x 10-12 m/s
  53. Friction tests Friction tests (Constant speed) (Constant speed) Effect of

    applied force (constant ( p ) ( p ) grinding speed) Depth(µm) A particle moving 1 cm/year with 2 N force would remove 0 2 nm of chip material in 20 seconds 0.2 nm of chip material in 20 seconds Lifetime of a 500um chip would be Applied force (N) Lifetime of a 500um chip would be 1.5 years only !!! Depth = √(Kf × grinding speed) Kf = 590 µm2/N Applied force (N) 24/35 Kf = 590 µm /N
  54. Chemical tests • Silicon is etched by hydroxide (OH-) –

    e.g. etching rate of silicon <100> with 20 % KOH at 20 °C is 25.3 nm/min Etching rate of lower concentrations is linear – Etching rate of lower concentrations is linear etching rate = (1.25 X 10-3) Concentration It will take 14,000,000 years to etch a • Ground water is usually slightly alkaline (pH 8) – Natural sources of hydroxide: 500 µm chip Natural sources of hydroxide: 1) Erosion of carbonate-containing “limestone” 2) Leaching from hardwood ashes (e.g. after forest fires) Concentration of ground water =5.61 X 10 -8 26/35
  55. Chemical tests Put the chip in Experiment Put the chip

    in 20 % KOH at 20 °C Leave it for Repeat Leave it for 50 min Repeat Clean & observe 27/35
  56. Chemical test results After 150 min the information was unreadable

    Estimated time: ~100,000 years to erase the information under pH8 condition information under pH8 condition 29/35
  57. Pressure considerations • Soil stress Example: to break 1 cm2

    chip (500um thick) S ill d h hi d i h d Example: to break 1 cm chip (500um thick) 4.58 MN is needed 1m deep = 9.6 MN • Silicon hardness Stress will reduce when chips are deeper in the ground 2m deep = 38.3MN 3m deep = 43.1MN 30/35
  58. Summary of stability test Type Result Solution yp Erosi Friction

    Not stable enough  packaging, resin cover  put it underground no thermal problem ion g Th Shock Stable no thermal problem less pressure problem  ti l t / f i ti ? Weat hermal Fatigue Stable Freezing Stable particle movement / friction ?  put the chip on the moon thering Pressure Not stable enough Ch i l N t t bl h  put the chip on the moon thermal problem ? friction problem ? Chemical Not stable enough friction problem ? no pressure problem (nobody there) no chemical problem (no water) 31/35 no chemical problem (no water)
  59. conclusions combination of line drawings + ontology tree used for

    teaching ontology tree used for teaching silicon device needs better layout, splitting into chips, protective coating splitting into chips, protective coating bili i hi h stability tests give hints how to improve lifetime of devices 33/35 p